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Sébastien Meunier

Sébastien Meunier

Director Industrial Transformation and Entrepreneurship


Tel. +41 61 295 50 15

sebastien.notexisting@nodomain.commeunier@baselarea.notexisting@nodomain.comswiss
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Concept of hydrogen fuel cell battery (Img: petrmalinak/shutterstock)

Concept of hydrogen fuel cell battery (Img: petrmalinak/shutterstock)

09.02.2016

University Basel with study on clean energy from fuel cells

Fuel cells generate electrical energy through a chemical reaction of hydrogen and oxygen. To obtain clean energy, the splitting of water into its components of hydrogen and oxygen is critical. Researchers at the University of Basel study how sunlight can be used for this purpose, a press release states. The scientific journal Chemical Communications published their latest results.

Artificial photosynthesis is one of the most promising approaches. This is when water is photo-electrochemically with the aid of sunlight separated into its components H2 and O2 and stored. A team of researchers led by the University of Basel chemists Catherine Housecroft and Edwin Constable are working together with the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) to implement this method.

Simulated fuel cells powered by light radiation
The process of splitting water (H2O) consists of two partial reactions, which are implemented with the help of different catalysts: water oxidation (which produces O2) and water reduction (which produces H2). The first is the more challenging of the two reactions, which is why research puts so much effort into the development of efficient and sustainable water oxidation catalysts.

The Basel-based chemists developed a water oxidation model in their current study which, although powered by electricity, generates the same chemical intermediate states as light. They used compounds of the chemical element ruthenium as a catalyst. The critical feature is the self-assembly of the individual components in a hierarchical structure. The researchers thus succeeded in simulating fuel cells powered by light radiation. This model allowed them to test the position and efficiency of the individual components.

Complete release of University Basel

Link to the study

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