Innovation Report

 
report Production Technologies

Three entrepreneurs, three visions of Industry 4.0

05.11.2018

BaselArea.swiss invited startups and Industry 4.0 projects to participate in the first Industry 4.0 Challenge. A jury from the industry chose three finalists: Philippe Kapfer with NextDay.Vision, Roy Chikballapur with MachIQ and Dominik Trost with holo|one. Learn more about their contributions and visions in the interview. You can meet the entrepreneurs at the Salon Industries du Futur Mulhouse on 20 and 21 November 2018.

BaselArea.swiss: Which problem does your company aim to solve?

Dominik Trost, holo|one: In general, our solutions utilise Augmented Reality to quickly bring know-how to where it is needed. This translates to offering intuitive means of maintenance support, such as holographic checklists or reporting tools, as well as AR enhanced remote assistance for companies to provide electronic information to sites around the globe, alongside common audiovisual calls. We also use holograms and animations as storytelling tools, and are developing an app entirely dedicated to design and presentation purposes. Most of all, we believe in keeping things simple: Our apps concentrate on a core set of powerful features and can all be managed through our browser-based management portal. People should be able to use our apps with as little effort as possible.

Roy Chikballapur, MachIQ: We help machine builders and manufacturers to gain equipment and asset performance. To that end, MachIQ provides a software for machine builders to simplify customer support and to monitor their machines, hence reducing unplanned outages for their customers. For manufacturers, MachIQ created a software that helps with predictive support and that combines useful functions for plant managers, controllers and the maintenance team alike. In short: We bring machines to life.

Philippe Kapfer, NextDay.Vision: We simplify communication between machine manufacturers and their customers and makes them safer. Normally, connections between two contacts are insecure and vulnerable because one or even both sides have to open the connection. This makes them vulnerable. Also, you usually need to interrupt the workflow to validate a partner. Our API is designed to help companies create integrated software. For example, a company can update its machine remotely and integrate the validation workflow directly on the customer side. The customer just logs on to his smartphone. He does so by signing in by hand. Afterwards, the manufacturer can update the machine from a distance. This leads to a traceable and rule-compliant process.

When and why did you found your company?

Philippe Kapfer: NextDay.Vision has been around since mid-2017. Before that, I wrote a book on the security of computer systems as part of my master's thesis, showing how Windows can be hacked – corporate computer systems are easily attackable from the inside. For fear of such attacks, many companies do not use the cloud, for example, and try to keep their systems closed. In discussions with machine manufacturers and their customers, I realized that there is a lack of solutions for this. In the course of digitalization, the question naturally arises as to how we can make connections secure. My company provides answers to that question.

Roy Chikballapur: When I was with Schneider Electric in Paris, I helped to digitalize industrial offers for different companies. However, by talking to the machine builders and manufacturers I learned that they struggled with much more basic problems. One of these fundamental problems is customer support – it simply takes too much time to look up customer and serial numbers and to fix stuff. All the while, the machine is not producing anything and only generates losses for the respective company. I had the idea for my company in 2014, in 2016 I launched MachIQ.

Dominik Trost: It all began with the presentation of the Microsoft HoloLens: We saw the presentation live and knew that AR will be a big thing using head-mounted devices. Soon we got the first device and had lots of workshops with companies from different areas of business. We immediately realized the benefits of this technology and companies saw their AR use cases too. After assessing the market potential in Switzerland, we founded our company just at the end of that year, first concentrating on individual showcases. We soon realized that a standardized approach better satisfies corporate needs, but there was still a lot of work to do: This year, we almost exclusively worked on developing ‘sphere’, our new AR platform that will be released at the end of November.

How did you learn about the i4 Challenge and why did you apply?

Dominik Trost: Markus Ettin, industry 4.0 and automatization manager at Bell Food Group, suggested that we might be a good fit for the i4.0 Challenge and motivated us to look deeper into it. Though having an international outlook, we found it important to strengthen the regional awareness for our technology as well, so we took our chances…

Philippe Kapfer: For me, the Challenge was like another litmus test. I wanted to know how our solution was received. In the Industry 4.0 Challenge, I had the opportunity to have my project reconfirmed by industry experts. At the same time, the jury acknowledged that we were actually bringing something new to industry.

Roy Chikballapur: We were in touch with the BaselArea.swiss team thanks to their support in us relocating from the Canton of Vaud to Basel-Stadt. Sebastien Meunier, who was responsible for the initiative posted about the i4 Challenge on LinkedIn and this is how we found out about it. I believe that the discussions on BaselArea’s LinkedIn community are very relevant to what’s happening in the Industry 4.0 sector and this is what motivated us to apply.

What does the term “Industry 4.0” mean to you and why do you consider the topic significant?

Dominik Trost: To us, industry 4.0 is the logical evolution of industry with the tools and technologies that are available or being developed. Like the ‘4.0’ epithet already suggests, we think that it is the industrial revolution of our generation, adding immense amounts of productivity, safety, and interconnectivity. It is therefore obvious to us that industry 4.0 will remain the hot topic over the following decade, and now is the ideal time to get on board.

Philippe Kapfer: I believe that "Industry 4.0" is often used to sell a new product or service. Often the technology was there before and is merely used differently under the title Industry 4.0. For me, that label first and foremost means that the industry is evolving.

Roy Chikballapur: I think there is more to the phrase. I agree that a lot of focus today seems to be on the technologies that enable the digitalization of processes, the generation of useful data and the algorithms that many expect will replace human beings in several functions on the shop floor. At Machiq however, we focus on the business model transformations that these technologies will bring about when they are deployed at scale and we find few companies are preparing themselves for this.

Here is an example: Most machine builders consider the sale of spare parts and the delivery of maintenance and repair services as their “Services Business”. However, their customers are actually buying the experience of zero unplanned outages. With the improved ability to connect machines and to analyze performance data in real time, outages can now be prevented.
However, in doing so, machine builders will likely reduce their spare parts revenue. Are they ready for this? Not as long as they stick to current business models. But what if they offered a “Netflix of spare parts and services”-contract where the customer instead buys uptime.

What if a yoghurt producer could pay his equipment supplier based on the number of pots of yoghurt produced per month? This would force a shift from a capital expenditure-heavy model to an operational expenditure-based model, even in the machinery industry. The Industry 4.0 model will force suppliers to collaborate with customers and competitors to collaborate with peers. It is our task to accompany all parties to take this transformative journey in a step-by-step manner that does not disrupt the current business models unnecessarily.

Where do you see the development in the region?

Roy Chikballapur: We settled in Basel primarily because of its location at the heart of the machine building industry in Europe. In a 300 km radius we have the largest concentration of leading machine building companies in every important industry. What was also a key attraction was the Canton's focus on Industry 4.0. While there are many startup hubs across Europe, they tend to focus on more “sexy” topics like Fintech, Blockchain and AI. Personally, I hope that the region instead takes up something that is more concrete and “real” as its focus area, capitalizing on its strength as a life sciences hub but also as a center of industry and logistics. We would like to see more collaboration among Industry 4.0 startups to integrate each of our products to develop more comprehensive offers for our customer base. We would also like to increase our collaboration with larger industrial companies in the region. I am certain that such a focus on the i4 theme will accelerate innovation and position Basel as a hub for Industry 4.0.

Dominik Trost: As a software company with a standardized product, our outlook is not as much regional, but rather national or defined by language barriers. Looking at the state of AR in Switzerland and Germany, there are indeed more pockets of development here than in other places, mostly in the form of individual startups and university programs. However, AR is still generally viewed as an experimental technology, despite applications being proven viable and beneficial. There is nowhere near as much drive and competition as in the US or East Asia – both a chance and a ticking clock for us.

What are your plans for your company?

Philippe Kapfer: We currently have customers mainly in the Jura and in the French-speaking parts of Switzerland. In addition to our products, I also offer training and audits on information security systems. In the future, I want to put even more capacity into development. We are targeting both the national and international markets with our security software and API. The cybersecurity market is growing by ten percent annually, but not enough people can respond to this development. NextDay.Vision provides the software that satisfies a need and makes it easier for companies to meet high security standards. We want to anchor cybersecurity in the mindset of the industry. This includes enabling connections between customers and manufacturers without sacrificing data security. We are confident that we will continue to grow with our product and vision.

Dominik Trost: At this point, almost anything is possible. We are actively building up our network of distributors and are also looking across the borders, already promoting our solutions in Germany and exploring our options in other countries. It is very likely for foreign competition to enter the European market, which makes it important for us to act quickly and decisively. We have, however, built a competent team and are very confident in the quality our products, so we are looking forward to what the future holds.

Roy Chikballapur: MachIQ has positioned itself as a neutral, brand agnostic player offering software products that connect machine builders and their industrial end-user customers for asset performance management. Machiq’s software creates the dynamics of a “data cooperative” for Industry 4.0. Common data benefits everyone on the system, but is managed securely so that it does not compromise the relationships that companies have built with their suppliers and customers or the competitive dynamics between business peers. Our vision is to become the “Business Operating System” of the Industry 4.0-enabled world. While many companies aren’t thinking about it, the moment we present our vision to them, they immediately get us and they get what we are trying to do. We are experiencing strong growth in our customer base. Consequentially, we are focusing on hiring the right talent and growing the team fast enough right now.

Text: Annett Altvater

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In Basel an Innovation Hub for Precision Medicine is Born

24.01.2017

A stakeholder group of healthcare experts from the life sciences industry and research initiated by BaselArea.swiss launches DayOne in close collaboration with Canton Basel-Stadt.

On Monday, 16 January 2017, decision makers from industry, university and the healthcare sector gathered in the Volkshaus, Basel, at the invitation of Christoph Brutschin to attend the launch of DayOne - the Innovation Hub for Precision Medicine. The initiative was dreamed up by BaselArea.swiss, the promoters of innovation and inward investment in the region, together with a core team of industry experts, and in his opening speech the Director of Economic Affairs for Canton Basel-Stadt made it clear what the initiative is all about: namely, the next development stage in the life sciences, where the Basel region should remain a prominent player. That increasing digitalization in the healthcare industry will not only provide for disruption, but also offers huge potential, as long as the right course is set, was also the main theme of the evening.

An introduction to the topic was provided by Peter Grönen, who - together with other industry experts – is one of the initiators of DayOne. The Head of Translational Science at Actelion explained why the linear innovation paradigm - in which tests for clinical relevance are only conducted late on in the process - inevitably ends in the notorious Valley of Death when it comes to the issue of precision medicine. The patient, says Grönen, has to take centre stage in research and development today - and remain included in all interactions. Groenen concluded his presentation with the observation that all the components are actually present in the Basel region to build a novel innovation ecosystem in which the various skills and disciplines operate not downstream of one another but work in constant collaboration.

And it is precisely this that is also the main driver of the DayOne initiative. The projects were then presented that are currently being pursued in the Basel region and are likely to enjoy an added boost as a result of the Innovation Hub in Precision Medicine. Torsten Schwede from the University of Basel reported on the Data Coordination Centre of the Swiss Personalized Health Network (SPHN), which is aimed at making all patent data of Switzerland’s university hospitals interoperable and accessible for research purposes. Christof Kloepper, Managing Director of BaselArea.swiss, presented BaseLaunch, the accelerator for healthcare ventures that will be officially launched at the end of February. And Laurenz Baltzer from Karger presented an ambitious scientific publication project on the subject of digital biomarkers.

Following these presentations, it was left to Frank Kumli, a co-initiator of DayOne from Ernst & Young, to show what the hub involves and how it fits into the innovation landscape of the region and offers added support.

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“I find it motivating to succeed together with others”

02.11.2016

Patrick Vergult is managing director of Actemium Switzerland Ltd, a provider of networked industrial and building automation with headquarters in Basel and five other sites in Switzerland.

In our interview, the native of Belgium explains what brought him to Switzerland, what objectives Actemium is pursuing and why he believes that, while Industry 4.0 will result in a revolution, we will only see an evolution in terms of the technology.

Your story sounds fascinating: you are Belgian, came to Switzerland in 1991 to work for Cern and are now the CEO of Actemium Switzerland – how did that come about?
Patrick Vergult*: In 1991 I arrived at Cern in Geneva as a freelance software engineer commissioned by ABB. At Cern I programmed cryogenic systems that could be cooled to minus 269 degrees Celsius. These systems are used to cool the magnets in the long ring of the particle accelerator until they reach the superconducting state. These magnets, which are as big as 10-storey building, detect the particles that arise when accelerated positrons and electrons collide. Actually my plan was to return to Belgium after six months, but then I stayed in Switzerland and have steadily extended my network. At that time, I was also co-founder of a company in Belgium called Iproco. The business was going very well here in Switzerland and so in 1998 we decided to establish a branch of Iproco in Switzerland. In 2001 this gave rise to Else Automation. Actemium came into being in 2013 as a result of the merger of Etavis Engineering, Controlmatic and our company, Else Automation.

What exactly does Actemium Switzerland do?
Actemium is basically a product-neutral automation company. We do not develop any products of our own, but integrate various automation and IT systems for our customers. In short, with our six business units we offer electrical, automation and IT technology for networked industrial and building automation, as well as overarching production management. Our objective is to remain with the customer from consultation, planning and implementation of a project right through to maintenance of the systems. After all, we have a strong connection with the products that we use and are very familiar with our customers’ processes.

What excites you about working for Actemium?
I find it motivating to create something together with other people and to be successful together. Actemium enables people like me, who have a very entrepreneurial spirit, to remain entrepreneurs, even though we belong to the large VINCI Group. Actemium is a network with a decentralized management structure. That means that, in this large entity, there are various small organizations – so-called business units – that operate as autonomous and agile players on the market. All our BUs are highly segmented, so that there is no competition between them.

Why was it decided to opt for Basel as headquarters?
The companies from which Actemium Switzerland emerged in 2013 already had a presence in the region. So in 2013 everything ultimately came together in Basel-Stadt. Originally we were competitors, if anything, which meant that our business units had to be well segmented. For us the pharmaceutical and chemical industries were and are hugely important. The pharmaceutical industry in particular invests a lot, Switzerland is an attractive hub and, above all, the Basel region has a very stable market.

Is it not difficult to prevail against the competition in the pharma hub of Basel?
Our competitors of course have a similar strategy. We try to stand out through other factors: The Actemium University offers training for customers and staff, and we also cultivate an internal network of talents for staff under 30 years of age known as Young at Actemium. Our young employees give presentations on the company from their own perspective at graduate fairs or universities – without the presence of a member of management. Trust is very important to us. This year we also introduced a Talent Award, for which theses can be submitted once a year by technicians and engineers. This annual prize will be awarded by us and external jurors from our customer base – for example from Roche, Novartis or Endress+Hauser. The aim of this award is to foster greater contact with universities and develop our own talents more. As part of this effort, we also train 20 apprentices every year and offer dual education studies for five or six students.

Is the strength of the franc a problem for Actemium?
We are fortunately heavily engaged in the pharmaceutical sector, where the strong franc only plays a minor role. Many pharmaceutical companies also export in dollars, a currency that has appreciated in value – which has offset the weakness of the euro to some extent. In fact, despite everything, we have steadily grown more than 10 percent in the last few years.

Aside from Switzerland, Actemium also has sites in Alsace and in Southern Germany – does this lead a trinational exchange?
It’s very important to us that our regional network is cultivated. The advantages of this to our customers and employees, however, depends heavily on their own personality. Some make intensive use of the opportunities, while others are perhaps a little more introverted and do not set as much store by networking. Beyond the three-countries corner, Actemium has business units in a further 35 countries. We are thus ideally positioned to service our customers; there are international working groups that share ideas and information on various issues. Recently, for example, a meeting took place in Paris on the topic of Industry 4.0. In the Basel region, we have established a three-countries corner network that meets three times a year to pool their strengths. We have already seen the first successes: a project in French-speaking Switzerland, for example, could only be tackled in the first place thanks to the pooling of knowledge by mechatronic experts from France and automation experts from Switzerland. This offers our customers huge added value of course, because they get everything from a single source. Actemium in Switzerland goes a step further: we have developed our own CV database, in which each of our 215 employees has posted his or her CV and expertise. The information is updated once a year at the performance appraisal interview with employees. In this way we can easily search for experts internally – regardless of whether we are looking for language skills or other expertise. And in fact we usually also find the skills we are looking for. Not the global Actemium network is expressing a strong interest in this solution. Digitalization continues its advance, and everyone is talking Industry 4.0.

How will this impact the work of Actemium?
We notice how the subject of Industry 4.0 tends to confuse our customers, because most of them don’t know exactly what it means. Industry 4.0 is not a ready-made solution that you can take out of a drawer – it differs from one customer to another. For this reason we will usually first get customers to explain what Industry 4.0 means for them – and then explain what we understand by it. In this way, we arrive at a shared understanding and a good starting point for successful projects. It’s not only about networking objects and gathering data in the Cloud – that’s just the beginning! When the data is in the Cloud, it requires smart conversion for the customer in order, for example, to improve the value chain. Industry 4.0 per se is not a revolution: technologies are used that have already been around for years. But it will lead to a revolution.

So it will take some time yet?
I believe so, because a lot of customers don’t yet seem ready to completely embrace the subject. Take a meat producer that organized a workshop on Industry 4.0, for example. The talk there was almost exclusively about SAP. The fact that the weather, for example, can influence people’s meat consumption and the production of meat could be rescheduled early on as a result did not register. In the future, visionaries who can show customers business opportunities in the area of Industry 4.0 will be in demand – I see great potential here. The strengths of the systems and technologies used have also not yet been exploited to the full by any means. There is still a lot of upward scope in the next 20 years.

What other trends do you see besides Industry 4.0?
We set great store by robotics, manufacturing execution systems and energy efficiency. As regards the latter in particular it is still early days. Our customers have so far had little incentive to invest in energy efficiency – this will probably not come about until there are legal requirements in place. I firmly believe that you always have to step outside your comfort zone, reinvent yourself and adapt in order to survive in the future. And I try to apply this philosophy at Actemium – so that the staff and thus also the company do not remain seated in their comfort zone for too long.

What do you expect from BaselArea.swiss and what would you like to see from the promotion of a region and innovation?
I think it’s great that there are neutral platforms like BaselArea.swiss. For when companies organize such events themselves, then it always happens for reasons of a concrete benefit that the company expects to derive from it. So neutral platforms are an advantage because they can also link up different networks.

What does Actemium want to achieve?
The basic values of the Actemium network place the focus on people. We invest an annual three to five percent of the payroll sum in further training for our employees. We cultivate the network and generate our own talent through the training of apprentices and the dual education system. But of course we also want to grow further – in order to establish a nationwide presence in the longer term. To make sure we remain sustainable, each business unit should occupy an innovative and future-oriented business area aside from its core expertise. But regardless of whether we are talking about employees, customers or shareholders, everyone should be happy. And we try to achieve this through healthy, stable and profitable growth.

And if you could wish for something for your company?
Then I would wish that we become the best automation company and the best employer in the field of automation nationwide. And we are well on track. If we achieve that, we can achieve anything – and we enjoy working hard on this every day.

Interview: Sébastien Meunier and Nadine Nikulski, BaselArea.swiss

*Patrick Vergult is the CEO of Actemium Switzerland Ltd., a company that offers solutions and engineering services in the field of industrial and building automation. Actemium sees its mission as helping its industrial customers to modernize their factories and buildings and increase their profitability.

In 2001, Patrick Vergult was co-founder and major shareholder of ELSE Automation Ltd. The company joined the VINCI Group in May 2011 and became part of the Actemium network of VINCI in 2013. In addition, he founded curaVer Business Support, a company that provides consulting and support services mainly to foreign companies settling up business in Switzerland. He was also successfully involved in the restructuring of travel company Venture Europe, where he underwrote the financial risk.

Discover Actemium Switzerland

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Production Technologies – der neue Bereich von BaselArea.swiss

02.11.2016

Derzeit reicht es nicht aus, einfach zu produzieren. Unternehmen müssen zu geringeren Kosten produzieren, sparsam mit Ressourcen umgehen, die Wünsche der Kunden berücksichtigen – alles in kürzester Zeit und möglichst ohne Lagerbestand. Neue Produktionstechnologien versprechen Lösungen. Additive Fertigung, Robotik oder Internet of Things: Die Produktion von Gütern wird sich in den nächsten Jahren stark verändern.

Neu bearbeitet BaselArea.swiss den Fachbereich „Production Technologies“. Die Region Basel ist gekennzeichnet durch die Präsenz von High-Tech-Unternehmen, die komplexe, qualitativ hochwertige Produkte zu hohen Lohnkosten herstellen. Die Lage Basels an der Grenze zum Elsass und zu Baden bietet ihnen eine echte Chance für den Austausch und die Zusammenarbeit zur Verbesserung der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit sowie zur Entwicklung neuer Geschäftsmodelle.

Im Zentrum des Technologiefelds Production Technologies steht der sorgfältige Umgang mit Ressourcen und der Einsatz von sauberen Technologien. Der Fokus liegt dabei auf den folgenden 6 Bereichen:

  • 3D-Druck, additive Fertigung: BaselArea.swiss organisiert Informations- und Networking-Veranstaltungen sowie Workshops zu diesem Thema und den neuen Geschäftsmodellen. Darüber hinaus existiert eine LinkedIn-Gruppe mit rund 100 Forschern und Themenbegeisterten. 
     
  • Industrie 4.0: In Zusammenarbeit mit Schulen und Forschungszentren bietet BaselArea.swiss Informationsveranstaltungen und technologieorientierte Networking-Veranstaltungen auf regionaler und internationaler Ebene. Darüber hinaus bringt der Technology Circle „Industrie 4.0“ Unternehmen zusammen, um sich zu informieren und das Know-how in der Region weiter zu entwickeln.
     
  • Organische und gedruckte Elektronik: Die druckfähige Elektronik hat das Auftauchen neuer Produkte ermöglicht, beispielsweise OPV, OLED oder Anwendungen in den Bereichen Gesundheit oder Sensoren. BaselArea.swiss initiiert die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Unternehmen und Forschungszentren bei technischen Projekten sowie im Vertrieb und entwickelt zusammen mit der Industrie ein Netzwerk von Kompetenzen im Rahmen des Technology Circles „Printed Electronics“.
     
  • Effizienz bei der Nutzung von Ressourcen und Energie in der Produktion: Im Rahmen eines Technolgy Circles hat BaselArea.swiss ein Netzwerk von Unternehmern aufgebaut, das diesen regelmässigen Austausch pflegt.
     
  • Wassertechnologien: Die effiziente Nutzung von Ressourcen steht im Mittelpunkt. Die Forschung konzentriert sich auf Problemstellungen wie Mikroverunreinigungen, die Rückgewinnung von Phosphor oder auch die im Wasser vorhandenen antibiotikaresistenten Gene. Einmal pro Jahr veranstaltet BaselArea.swiss eine Veranstaltung in Zusammenarbeit mit der Hochschule für Life Sciences der Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (FHNW).
     
  • Biotechnologien für die Umwelt: Die Nutzung von lebenden Organismen in industriellen Prozessen ist nicht neu, gewinnt aber an Bedeutung, zum Beispiel bei der Behandlung von Ölunfällen. Dank Biokunststoffen aus erneuerbaren Rohstoffen (wie Lignin) bieten ökologischere Lösungen echte Alternativen zu den herkömmlichen chemischen Prozessen. BaselArea.swiss organisiert regelmässig Veranstaltungen zu diesem Thema und schafft Verbindungen zwischen Forschern, Industrie und Verwaltung.

Die gemeinsame LinkedIn-Gruppe „Production Technologies by BaselArea.swiss“ zählt heute bereits 46 Mitglieder, die sich gegenseitig über die neuesten Entwicklungen in den oben genannten Gebieten austauschen. Die Gruppe ist offen für neue Teilnehmer – melden Sie sich an!

Wenn Sie Interesse am Austausch mit Unternehmern und Forschern zum Thema „Production Technologies“ haben oder weitere Informationen über unsere Services wünschen, dann kontaktieren Sie einfach Sébastien Meunier (siehe Kontaktdaten links).

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“This is the century of biology and biology for medicine”

05.10.2016

Andreas Manz is considered one of the pioneers in the field of microfluidics and at present is a researcher at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology in Saarbrücken (KIST Europe) and professor at Saarland University.

In our interview, the successful scientist explains the motivation that drives him to research and what it means to receive a lifetime achievement award from the European Patent Office.

You are known as a pioneer of microfluidics. How did you come to start researching in a completely new field?
Andreas Manz*:
Even as a child I was really fascinated by small things. They were mostly stones, insects or bugs that I took home with me. This interest in small things stayed with me, and eventually I went on to study chemistry at the ETH Zurich. In my PhD thesis I examined the natural law of molecular diffusion. If you entrap two molecules in a very small volume – rather like two birds in a cage – they cannot get away and become faster. I was instantly fascinated by this acceleration. My professor Willy Simon, an expert in chemical sensors and chromatography, talked in his lectures about processes can also get very fast when they are reduced in size. And that instantly fascinated me.

But so far you have been talking about pure chemistry – when did you get the idea of using chips?
I started working for a company in Japan in 1987. That’s where I first came into contact with chip technology. I was part of the research department myself, but I kept seeing colleagues disappearing into cleanrooms and coming back with tiny chips. That inspired me and got me wondering whether you could not also pack chemistry onto these chips instead of electronics. After all, even the inner workings of the tiniest insect involves the transportation of fluid, so it should also work on a small chip. At Hitachi I was eventually able to get my first microfluidic chip produced for test purposes.

From Japan your journey then took you to Ciba-Geigy in Basel. What prompted that move?
Michael Widmer was then Head of Analytical Chemistry Research at Ciba-Geigy in Basel. This brilliant fascinated me from the word go: he had the vision that you should also integrate crazy things in research and not only look for short-term financial success. Industry should allow itself to invest in quality and also develop or promote new methods in the research activities of a company if it could be of benefit to the company. So Professor Widmer brought me to Basel, where it was my mission to pack “the whole of chemistry”, as he put it, on a single chip. While Michael Widmer did not yet know what to expect, he had a feeling that it could be worthwhile.

How did you go about it?
At that time, chips were very new and not entirely appropriate for the world of pharmaceuticals. Ciba-Geigy, too, was not enthusiastic about the new application initially. There was no great interest in making changes to existing technologies and processes that worked. But in my research I was able to try out what might be possible. I found, for example, that electrophoresis – a method for separating molecules – could work. It would be relatively easy to miniaturize this method and test it to see whether it also speeds up the process. And the results were very good: We were able to show that a tenfold miniaturization of electrophoresis makes the process 100 times faster without compromising the quality of the information. This realization was really useful for clinical diagnosis and the search for effective molecules in drug discovery. At the same time, we were also testing different types of chips that we sourced from a wide variety of producers.

When did the time come to go public with the new technology?
At the ILMAC in Basel in 1996, Michael Widmer organized a conference in the field of microfluidics – which proved to be a bombshell. We had planned for this effect to a large extent, because in the run-up to the meeting we had already invited selective researchers and shown them our work. This hyped things up a little, and at the conference we were eventually able to mobilize researchers from Canada, the USA, the Netherlands, Japan and other countries to present the new technology of microfluidics.

Although the attention was there, Ciba-Geigy nevertheless later brought research in this field to an end. Why was that?
Basically we lacked lobby groups within the company and a concrete link to a product. Our research was somewhat too technical and far ahead of its time, and within Ciba-Geigy they were simply not yet able to assess the potential of the technology. Added to which, we had not given any concrete consideration to applications; we were more interested in the technology and experiments than in its commercial use. When a large picture of me then appeared in a magazine with a report on microfluidics, and the journal pointed out on its own initiative that Ciba-Geigy was not adequately implementing the technology, the research was stopped. I was quite fortunate under the circumstances: Since the company had terminated the project, I found that – despite a non-compete clause – I was able to follow the call to Imperial College in London within a short time, where I could continue research in microfluidics with students. In addition, I joined a company in Silicon Valley as consultant.

Is it not typical that a large company fails to transform a pearl in its portfolio into a new era?
You should not see it so negatively, because microfluidics was a pearl not for the pharmaceutical industry, but rather for environmental analysis, research or clinical diagnosis. The pharmaceutical industry dances to a different tune. It prefers to buy in the finished microscope at a higher price than get it constructed itself for relatively little money. Michael Widmer and his team in research and analytical chemistry at Ciba-Geigy developed many things in a wide variety of fields – with which were far ahead of their time.

Microfluidics is an established field today. What are the driving forces now?
To my mind there are two driving forces: firstly the application and the users and secondly academic curiosity as regards the technology and also training. The first of these is the stronger driving force: there are cases in which the application of a microfluidic solution is not absolutely necessary to do justice to the application. Take “point of care”, for example. The objective is to analyse a patient directly at the place where he or she is treated – for example, in intensive care. The patient is evaluated, blood and respiratory values are analysed, and it is possible to assess immediately whether the measures taken are having an effect in the patient. Another possibility is to integrate the widest variety of analytical options in smartphones – similar to the Tricoder in Star Trek. I’m pretty sure that something like that is feasible. But at the moment the hottest topic in the commercial sector is clinical diagnostics. This came as a surprise to me, because you cannot reuse a chip that has come into contact with a patient’s blood. You need a lot of consumable material, which is also reflected in the price. But perhaps new funding models can be found in which, for example, the device is provided, but the consumable material – i.e. the chips – are paid for separately, rather like a razor and razor blades.

Where do you see opportunities for Switzerland in this field?
The education of qualified people is important. Here the ETH and EPFL play a particularly important role for Switzerland, because they attract students from all over the world. They hopefully leave Switzerland with good memories and could possibly campaign later for the commercialization of technologies. That could be a huge opportunity. Of course there are also generous people within Switzerland, but there is a tendency here to economize and think twice before deciding whether and, if so, where to invest one’s money. It’s a question of mentality and not necessarily typically Swiss. It’s also not a bad thing, because in precision mechanics, for example, reliability and precision are essential – and this technology fits with our mentality. “Quick and dirty” works better in Silicon Valley and Korea – but the products then often fail to ensure up to the quality standards here. As a high-price island, Switzerland offers little, opportunity for cheap production, which is why the focus is on education and existing technologies. This too is very important and has a good future.

Will microfluidics one day become as big as microelectronics is today?
I don’t think so, because it is limited to chemical and cytobiological applications and is also not as flexible as microelectronics. At most, I see the new technology being used on existing equipment or processes.

But most of the systems on the market today are very much closed, so it is difficult to integrate new technologies here.
Yes, but that’s only partly true, because existing devices also have to be upgraded. Take a mass spectrometer, for example. You can buy one of these, and there are certainly many companies that sell this equipment. But if ten companies offer something equivalent, you have to stand out from the mass. So if a “Lab on a Chip” is added on, then this mass spectrometer enjoys a clear advantage. While the company makes money from the sale of the equipment, it is the microfluidic chip that gives the incentive to buy – and there is certainly a lot of money to be made from this. You see, we are living in the century of biology and medicine and are only just beginning to takes cells from the body to regenerate them and then perhaps re-implanting them as a complete organ. When you see what has been achieved in physics and electrical engineering in the last century, and translate that into biology and medicine, then we have an awful lot ahead of us. Technology is needed to underpin these radical changes. SMEs in particular are very good at selling their products to research; that’s a niche. In most cases, small companies use old technology and modify it – such as a chip in a syringe that then analyses directly what the constituents of a fluid are when it is drawn up into the syringe. This opens up many opportunities.

You have also co-founded companies, but describe yourself mainly as a researcher. How do the two go together?
Actually I was never an entrepreneur, but always just a scientific advisor. I preferred to experience the academic world instead of becoming fully engaged in a company. Deep down, I’m an adventurer who comes to a company with wild ideas. Money is also never a priority for me; I always wanted to improve the quality of life or give something to humanity. It is curiosity that drives me. When I see a bug that flies, that drives me to find out how it works. There are ingenious sensors in the tiniest of creatures, and as long as we cannot replicate these as engineers, we still have work to do. This inspires me much more than quarterly sales revenue and profits.

But money is also an important driver for research.
Yes, it’s all about money, right down to university research. Research groups are commissioned by companies because of the profit they hope to gain. Even publicly funded research always has to show evidence of a commercial application. Curiosity or the goal of achieving something of ethical value is hardly a topic in the engineering sciences. Of course it’s important that our students can also enter industry; after all, most of the tax revenue comes from industry. But if I personally had the freedom to choose, then I would prefer to pursue work as a form of play – which can by all means result in something to be taken seriously. Take electrophoresis on a chip: That was also quite an absurd idea to begin with, and it led to something really exciting! A lot of my work therefore has a playful, non-serious aspect to it – for me that is exactly right. You see, I can produce a chip which deep inside it is as hot as the surface of the sun, but which you can nevertheless hold in your hand. It’s crazy, but it works, because only the electrons have a temperature of 20,000 Kelvin. The glass outside does not heat up very much as a result, and the chip does not melt. And suddenly you have plasma emission spectroscopy on a chip as the result of a crazy idea. I feel research calls for a certain sense of wit, and I often like to say that, with microfluidics research, we take big problems and make them so small that you can “no longer see them”.

You have covered so many areas of microfluidics yourself – are other researchers still able to surprise you with their work?
Admittedly, I am rather spoiled today by all the microfluidic examples that I have already seen. Sometimes I feel bored when I go to a microfluidics conference and see what “new” things have emerged – I somehow get the feeling I’ve seen it all before. The pioneering days, when there was also a degree of uncertainty at play, are probably definitely over. Today you can liken microfluidics to a workshop where you get the tools you need at any given time. This means of course that the know-how has also become more widespread: Initially I possessed perhaps a third of all knowledge about microfluidics worldwide; today it is much less. So I now enjoy casting my research net further afield.

You received a lifetime achievement award from the European Patent Office last year. What does this award mean to you?
You cannot plan for an award – at most you can perhaps hope for one. When you then get it, it brings a great sense of joy. The award process itself was also exciting: as with the Oscars, there were three nominees: a Dutchman who developed the coding standard for CD, DVD and Blu-ray discs, which is still used to this day, and a researcher from Latvia who is one of the most successful scientists and inventors in medical biochemistry with more than 900 patents and patent applications. Faced with this competition, I reckoned I did not have much chance of the award and was absolutely astonished when I was chosen. The jury explained that its decision was down to the snowball effect: citations almost always refer to my patents at the time with Ciba-Geigy.

Interview: Fabian Käser and Nadine Nikulski, BaselArea.swiss

*Andreas Manz is a researcher at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology in Saarbrücken (KIST Europe) and professor at the Saarland University. He is regarded today as one of the pioneers in microchip technology for chemical applications.

After positions in the research labs of Hitachi in Japan and at Ciba-Geigy in Basel, he took up a professorship at Imperial College in London, where he headed the Zeneca-SmithKline Beecham Centre for Analytical Chemistry. In the meantime he was also a scientific advisor for three companies in the field of chip laboratory technology, one of which he founded himself. In 2003, Manz moved to Germany and headed the Leibniz Institute of Analytical Sciences (ISAS) in Dortmund until 2008.

Around 40 patents can essentially be attributed to him, and he has published more than 250 scientific publications, which have been cited more than 20,000 times to date.

report Production Technologies

Le Salon Be 4.0 à Mulhouse réunit les industriels européens

03.07.2018

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JELLIX IIoT Plateform, un pas de plus dans l’industrie connectée

03.07.2018

report Production Technologies

Keime und Antibiotikaresistenzen – ein Eventthema, das uns alle betrifft

05.10.2016

Bereits zum siebten Mal findet am 25. Oktober 2016 der eintägige Event aus der Reihe der Wassertechnologie statt, den BaselArea.swiss gemeinsam mit der Hochschule für Life Sciences der Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (HLS FHNW) organisiert. Am diesjährigen Event dreht sich im „Gare du Nord“ in Basel alles um „Keime, Antibiotikaresistenz und Desinfektion in Wassersystemen“.

Die Teilnehmer erleben Vorträge und Diskussionen, Institutionen können sich in der Fachausstellung mit Postern zeigen und so zu vertieften Diskussionen anregen. Ein Schlüssel für den langjährigen Erfolg der Veranstaltungsreihe ist die Kooperation der beiden Partner. Thomas Wintgens vom Institut für Ecopreneurship der HLS FHNW betont: „Uns ist die Zusammenarbeit mit BaselArea.swiss sehr wichtig, weil die Organisation ein regional stark vernetzter Akteur im Bereich von Innovationsthemen ist.“

Man habe eine gute Symbiose zwischen spezifischen, fachlichen Kompetenzen und dem Wissen über Themen und Akteure gefunden. „Auch in diesem Jahr ist es uns wieder gelungen, ein komplett neues Thema aufzunehmen“, sagt er. Die Forschungsaktivitäten der Gruppe um Philippe Corvini von der Hochschule für Life Sciences FHNW gaben den ersten Impuls zur diesjährigen Themenwahl.

Philippe Corvini, warum ist das Thema „Keime, Antibiotikaresistenz und Desinfektion in Wassersystemen“ spannend für eine grosse Veranstaltung?
Philippe Corvini: Das Thema ist in den letzten Jahren stärker in den Bereich der Umweltforschung vorgedrungen, immer mehr Arbeitsgruppen beschäftigen sich mit dem Verhalten und Vorkommen von Antibiotikaresistenzen in der Umwelt. Zudem haben auch auf nationaler Ebene die Aktivitäten zugenommen, es gibt ein nationales Forschungsprogramm und eine nationale Strategie zum Umgang mit Antibiotikaresistenzen. In den nächsten Jahren wollen wir intensiver untersuchen, wie sich diese Resistenzen zum Beispiel in biologischen Kläranlagen verhalten und welche Faktoren die Weitergabe von genetischen Informationen, die zu Antibiotikaresistenzen führen, beeinflussen.

Welche neuen Erkenntnisse erwarten die Besucher?
Philippe Corvini:
Wir werden am Event die neuesten Ergebnisse unserer Forschung vorstellen. Bisher wurde eine Resistenz relativ simpel erklärt: In der Umwelt existiert ein Antibiotikum, wodurch sich Resistenz-Gene bilden. Diese werden übertragen, die Resistenz verbreitet sich. Wir haben nun entdeckt, dass resistente Bakterien ein Genom besitzen, das sich weiterentwickelt, so dass sie sich am Ende sogar von Antibiotika ernähren können. Diese resistenten Bakterien bauen also die Antibiotika-Konzentration ab, so dass Bakterien, die sonst empfindlich auf den Wirkstoff reagiert haben, nun im Medium überleben und sogar ihrerseits eine Resistenz entwickeln können. Wir hoffen, künftig die Ausbreitung der Resistenzen bremsen zu können.

Wie könnte man dies schaffen?
Thomas Wintgens:
Wir werden demnächst im Pilotmasstab verschiedene Betriebsweisen von biologischen Kläranlagen untersuchen, um herauszufinden, wie diese Verbreitungswege durch Betriebseinstellungen in den Anlagen beeinflusst werden können. Ausserdem forschen wir an Filtern, welche die antibiotikaresistenten Keime zurückhalten und so die Keimzahl stark reduzieren können.

Warum ist die diesjährige Veranstaltung auch für Laien interessant?
Philippe Corvini:
Ich glaube, fast jeder hat eine Meinung zum Thema Antibiotikaresistenz und viele Leute haben eine Ahnung, wie dringend das Thema ist. Schliesslich betrifft das Thema Gesundheit uns alle.

Ein Fachevent – auch für Laien
Laut Thomas Wintgens dürfen die Teilnehmer viele kompetente Redner erwarten: „Wir freuen uns zudem sehr, dass Helmut Brügmann von der Eawag die nationale Strategie und deren Bedeutung für den Umweltbereich vorstellen wird.“

Generell berührt das Thema Wasser uns alle, weil es unser wichtigstes Lebensmittel ist. Wir konsumieren es als Trinkwasser, über Nahrungsmittel oder nutzen es für unsere persönliche Pflege. Gerade deswegen die Wassertechnologie laut Wintgens ein spannendes Thema für eine öffentliche Veranstaltung: „Wasserqualität ist jedem von uns wichtig und es besteht in der Öffentlichkeit ein grosses Interesse an diesem Thema.“ Gleichzeitig würden die Wassertechnologien aber auch Firmen die Möglichkeit bieten, innovative Produkte zu entwickeln und Stellen zu schaffen.

Seit 2009 Plattform für das regionale Netzwerk
Die HLS FHNW veranstaltet seit 2009 gemeinsam mit i-net/BaselArea.swiss die Veranstaltungsreihe im Bereich Wassertechnologie, welche jährlich rund 120 Teilnehmer anzieht. Die Idee, eine Eventreihe zu starten, entstand aus der Überzeugung heraus, dass Wasser in der Region ein wichtiges Thema ist und hier die Wertschöpfungskette vorhanden ist», so Thomas Wintgens. Jedes Jahr setzten die Verantwortlichen neue Themenschwerpunkte, zum Beispiel Mikroverunreinigungen im Wasserkreislauf, Membranverfahren oder Phosphor-Rückgewinnung. Wintgens erklärt: „Jedes Jahr machen Akteure aus der Forschung, der Technologie oder dem Bereich der Anwendungen mit und präsentieren sich vor Ort“.

Der Plattform-Gedanke war den Initianten von Anfang an wichtig, der Event sollte das regionale Netzwerk stärken und Innovationsvorhaben ermöglichen. Diese Strategie hat sich laut Thomas Wintgens bewährt: „Der Anlass ist ein wichtiger Baustein in unserer Öffentlichkeitsarbeit und wurde zu einem festen Treffpunkt der Interessenten und Kooperationspartnern aus der Region“. Viele Teilnehmer würden den Event schon seit Jahren verfolgen und seien jeweils neugierig auf das Thema im nächsten Jahr.

BaselArea.swiss und die Hochschule für Life Sciences FHNW  (HLS) führen am 25. Oktober im „Gare du Nord“ in Basel ein Symposium unter dem Titel „Keime, Antibiotikaresistenz und Desinfektion in Wassersystemen“ mit Referenten aus den Bereichen Forschung, Verwaltung, Wasserversorgung und Technologieanbieter durch. Eine Anmeldung bis 19.10.2016 ist erforderlich.

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Willemin-Macodel porte l’innovation dans son ADN

07.05.2018

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Biotech industry continues to grow

07.05.2018

report Micro, Nano & Materials

The Chemical Industry is ALIVE in the Basel region!

07.09.2016

“The chemical industry is dead…” this was the provoking first sentence of the invitation to the Business Event «Chemical Industry: Opportunities in the Basel area», Sept. 1st 2016, at Infrapark Baselland (Link). And it really provoked the speakers to demonstrate the opposite! Over 90 people gathered at the Infrapark Baselland to listen to the stories of change and new successes.

Thomas Weber, cantonal counciler of Baselland, welcomed the audience. “The benefits of Chemical Parks” were quite obvious after the talk of Dr. Ulrich Ott, Head of Clariant Europe – make your own core process, but buy everything else, from analytics to logistics and technical services. Currently, the third wave in park development just happens: the business incubation of new companies.

Distribution of chemicals and prototype testing
Three speakers from three different companies at the Infrapark illustrated very nicely the different benefits for different needs. Dr. Albrecht Metzger of Bayer Crop Science Schweiz AG illustrated the very successful expansion of the production facilities of Bayer Crop Science. Within 8 years, the number of employees triplet and more than 100m CHF investments were taken to expand and improve the production. The engineering and services of the Infrapark were essential for this success.

Smart distribution of chemicals and conditioning is the core business of Brenntag, as Dr. Thomas Heinrich, of the Brenntag Schweizerhall AG explained. With a global turnover of over a billion Swiss Francs, there is no question that a company can make money by just distribution! Their service adds real value to the supply chain. At the Infrapark, there are not only many users of chemicals, there is also a very smart distribution system established by the right mix of tanks and piping. This saves the chemical companies a lot of own handling, decreases truck movements and increases safety. Really a smart business – right at the Infrapark.

The facilities provide also the ideal location for young companies. AVA Biochem has patented processes to turn sugars into valuable chemicals which might make plastic bottles 100% renewable. Already 20 tons per year of 5-HydroxyMethylFurfural (5-HMF) can be produced in Muttenz, as Dr. Thomas M. Kläusli of AVA Biochem BSL AG explained. This test production is the prototype for much larger capacities – and it is ideally suited at the Infrapark with all the infrastructure and the fast responses of the different service units.

Chemical industry economically important for the region
The chemical industry is very well alive! Renaud Spitz, Head of Infrapark Baselland AG and Country Head Clariant Switzerland, explained how Clariant developed the vision of an Infrapark in 2011 at what benefits it already has today for 15 different companies. Vaguely, he outlined an even larger vision of a great common Infrapark in this area with benefits for many stakeholders, even though the realization might take many years. Finally, Thomas Kübler of Economic Promotion Baselland, illustrated how important the chemical industry is economically for this area. He reminded us also that many products for the pharma industry are being produced chemically, even though pharma and chemistry are often taken as two very different industries.

In conclusion, a very impressive demonstration of the strength of the chemical industries here. Definitely, the chemical industry is very much alive in this region!

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Endress+Hauser wins Red Dot Award

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Industrie 4.0 am südlichen Oberrhein

03.04.2018

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BaselArea.swiss welcomes Biopharmaceutical Company Ultragenyx

06.07.2016

BaselArea.swiss Economic Promotion is pleased to announce that Ultragenyx, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of novel products for rare and ultra-rare diseases based in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, is opening their European headquarters in the city of Basel, Switzerland. Stefano Portolano, M.D., has been appointed Senior Vice President and head of Ultragenyx Europe. In this role, Dr. Portolano will be responsible for building and leading the Ultragenyx commercialization efforts across Europe and developing the company's European organization.

«Ultragenyx selected Basel as our European headquarters because of the area’s thriving life sciences community, accessibility to the rest of Europe, business-friendly environment and strong international talent pool,» said Dr. Portolano. «On behalf of Ultragenyx, I would like to thank the team at BaselArea.swiss for their partnership throughout this process, as they have been invaluable as we look to establish our European presence and help bring promising therapies to patients throughout the region. We are focusing on key hires to establish necessary capabilities so that we are ready to launch if we receive approval, and we are confident we will be able to find and attract key talents in Basel».

Dr. Portolano brings over 20 years of experience in the biopharmaceutical industry, in medical, commercial and general management roles in both Europe and the United States. He has worked both on pre-launch and launches of products for rare diseases, both at Genzyme and Celgene. Before joining Ultragenyx, he spent ten years at Celgene Corporation in increasing leadership roles, most recently as Vice President of Strategy & Commercial Operations, EMEA. Prior to Celgene, he worked at Genzyme for eight years. Dr. Portolano received his M.D. degree from Federico II University in Napoli, Italy. He completed his postdoctoral fellowship and served as Adjunct Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco.

About Ultragenyx
Ultragenyx is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company committed to bringing to market novel products for the treatment of rare and ultra-rare diseases, with a focus on serious, debilitating genetic diseases. Founded in 2010, the company has rapidly built a diverse portfolio of product candidates with the potential to address diseases for which the unmet medical need is high, the biology for treatment is clear, and for which there are no approved therapies.

The company is led by a management team experienced in the development and commercialization of rare disease therapeutics. Ultragenyx’s strategy is predicated upon time and cost-efficient drug development, with the goal of delivering safe and effective therapies to patients with the utmost urgency.

The company's website for more information on Ultragenyx

About BaselArea.swiss
BaselArea.swiss is responsible for the international promotion of the economic region of Basel, Switzerland. In a joint effort, the economic promotion agencies of the Swiss cantons of Basel-Stadt, Basel-Landschaft, and the Jura support expansion and relocation projects of foreign companies, and offer consulting services to entrepreneurs and startups. The identification and procurement of suitable real estate and properties for international and national companies is an important service of BaselArea. BaselArea’s consulting services for interested parties are provided free of charge.

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The new FHNW Institute for Digital Construction is present at Swissbau

09.01.2018

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VR, AR, mixed – three words for reality

14.12.2017

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«As an entrepreneur you have to be a little paranoid»

07.10.2015

Adrian Bult, the Basel private investor and member of various boards of directors, is an acknowledged expert with an in-depth knowledge of Switzerland’s ICT sector. Since March 2013, he has been engaged on a voluntary basis as head of the i-net Technology Field ICT. In this interview he explains that makes entrepreneur types and why he is convinced that Switzerland could quite easily produce the next Google.

What’s it like being a Business Angel in Switzerland?
Adrian Bult*: Basically I have an exciting life. I am constantly confronted with new ideas and incentives. I have to do with young entrepreneurs, and that is very enriching for me.

Do you also mean that in a literal sense?
Certainly, because I am primarily interested in the content and people. So I also don’t see myself as an investor but as an interested developer of companies.

You invest above all in ICT – are there enough interesting cases?
Yes, in my view there are an awful lot of good ideas in Switzerland and a distinct sense of enterprise. But most is privately funded. In this respect Switzerland is unique. There is probably no other country anywhere in the world where so much in the way of financial resources flows into innovation from private investors or companies. This is also different from Silicon Valley, where enterprise is driven by a highly professional venture capital industry.

So you also have to lower your sights accordingly in Switzerland?
Yes, and Switzerland also has a small domestic market. This therefore begs the question of ambition right at the outset of any start-up. In the B-to-C segment, if you don’t step up to the plate with a global vision, then you usually have little chance from the start. Switzerland is therefore above all a country with lots of interesting niche providers – especially in the B-to-B segment.

What is lacking in most of the cases you encounter?
Switzerland has a distinct pharmaceutical, engineering and chemical culture. But a good sales and marketing culture is also important for the success of a start-up. In this respect, other countries - especially the USA, for example - have a head start. They give much more emphasis to marketing. Young technology-driven entrepreneurs in particular believe the best product will succeed. But that is often just not the case. In most cases it is the product that is marketed best that comes out on top.

But in Silicon Valley aren’t companies still being founded by techies and nerds, not by marketing people?
That’s true, but marketing has the same importance as engineering operations. If you tell someone at a party that you’re a salesman, then the reaction is usually very muted. This has to do with the fact that, in Switzerland, understatement is seen as a great virtue. Self-marketing is nothing like as important as it is in other cultures. That’s something we Swiss have to learn.

Does a start-up founder without salesman qualities have no chance?
Absolutely. How else does he want to attract investors for his project? This is where it starts. And then you also need a certain ambition. There are founders who focus on the global market from the outset. In Switzerland, this is immediately greeted with smiles. But basically this is the right attitude in order to reel in the first customer. This is also a typical approach of many technology-driven start-up founders in Switzerland: pick up the phone and work through a list of leads. Most people feel this is beneath them.

Are there other patterns you often come across in young Swiss entrepreneurs?
Something I always see especially in start-ups is an underestimation of the time that is needed to achieve the desired results. If you underestimate the time and the funding is linked to this time axis, then you have to react in good time when you see that you are going to need longer. Otherwise you run out of steam.

So you should always plan for twice as much time and money as you think?
No, that would be wrong. I’m in favour of setting a tight deadline and keeping funds short. But you have to react in good time if you see that things are getting tight. You need the pressure – otherwise you don’t move.

Can Switzerland and Europe ever produce an ICT giant?
Why not? You always only hear of Google, Airbnb or Uber. But there are also companies that are working very successfully one or two steps below this radar. There are some areas where technologically very advanced solutions are being developed in Switzerland. Such as “Over the Top” internet TV.

Does Switzerland not simply make too little of its opportunities? It is not Zurich but London that is the FinTech centre of the world today.
In Switzerland there have certainly been developments in this direction; for example, companies invested early on in e-private banking, and apps from big Swiss banks lead the field today. But a cluster has not formed around this as it has in London. Why is that? To succeed in the FinTech sector, banks have to cannibalize their own business. Under these conditions it is simply difficult to drive innovation forward within your own organization. This is why I argue in favour of cooperative ventures. Twint from Postfinance is a good example of how this can succeed.

With the coalescence of ICT and Life Sciences, the next opportunity presents itself for Switzerland and the Northwest region in particular. What needs to be done to make sure this opportunity is not missed?
Innovation arises through collaboration. Small companies often lack the know-how and the resources for major roll-outs. Established companies on the other hand lack the agility to achieve the best-possible result with few resources. I would therefore suggest approaching such issues more in project networks. It is typically just a few people in the management of large companies who decide whether an idea is good or bad. A completely different approach is taken in Silicon Valley, where there is a sponsor for any given idea. This sponsor gets together with financial investors and technical experts and interacts with them. If the idea goes down well and there is potential for improvement, then it is on the right track. If the comments are constantly negative, then it is probably the wrong way. The upshot is that, in Silicon Valley, it is the competent people with a competent opinion who are the decisive actors, not an individual in management. It is noticeable that this model is slowly coming to be accepted in Switzerland as well.

And yet Switzerland is world champion in innovation?
I would take the assertion that “Switzerland is world champion in innovation” with a very large dose of salt. Such statements just make you feel comfortable. If an innovation is in the process of redefining a market, then it can never be too soon to notice it. As an entrepreneur you have to be positively paranoid in this respect and should be constantly considering whether you are good enough and what could be improved.

It is often said that enterprise is not highly regarded in Switzerland and the willingness to take risks is given too little regard.
I feel this has changed a lot. In fact I see a lot of young people who set about projects with a very strong appetite for risk. Failure today is also no longer so serious. It is also very valuable for personal development if you have established your own company. I see young entrepreneurs today who are much further on than I was at the same age because they have established their own company.

You said at the start that in Switzerland it is mainly private individuals who invest. What could be done to ensure that even more is invested?
It could be encouraged by giving people the possibility to experience this themselves. For example, instead of investing heavily in training and continuing education, large companies could give management staff the opportunity to invest training money also in a start-up. If an MBA costs 20,000 francs, for example, the company could get the manager to pay up 20,000 francs themselves on top in order to support a small company with this capital. I’m convinced the learning effect in terms of reading balance sheets and profit-and-loss accounts or driving projects is at least as great as it is when compiling a case study at a prestigious university. If you can convey this credibly in a job interview, then this experience is just as valuable as a title.

What do you think of tax incentives for companies that create added value?
Basically I always find it positive when incentives are created for people who are prepared to take a risk. If someone takes a big risk, he should also be rewarded for this. Tax incentives are one possible way of doing this.

Interview: Thomas Brenzikofer and Nadine Nikulski, i-net

*Adrian Bult has worked on an honorary basis for i-net as Head of ICT since March 2013. Bult is an acknowledged expert with an in-depth knowledge of Switzerland’s ICT sector. From 1998 to 2007 he was a member of the group management of Swisscom and from 2007 to April 2012 he was COO of Swiss-based bank software vendor Avaloq. Today Adrian Bult is a consultant and investor. He is Chairman of the Board of Directors at Swissgrid and Enkom Group and a member of the Board of Directors at Adnovum, Swissquote, Regent Beleuchtungskörper and Alfred Müller AG.

Adrian Bult (born in 1959) studied business administration and marketing at the University of St. Gallen.

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«My experience with nanomaterials is welcomed in Bern»

10.09.2015

The company Polycompound from Sissach specializes in the incorporation of nanoparticles in plastics. Each year it processes amongst other things more than 1000 kilograms of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are long cylindrical structures with a diameter of less than 10 nanometers. Safety in the processing of these tiny particles is extremely important, especially since the effects of CNTs in the human body have not yet been conclusively studied.

Peter Imhof, Sales Manager at Polycompound, has been working with nanomaterials himself for around 10 years. He is not only a regular guest in the i-net Technology Circle NanoSafety, but also serves as adviser to the Federal Offices for the Environment (FOEN) and Public Health (FOPH). In this interview, he explains what measures are needed when working with nanoparticles and what regulations still need to be defined more precisely.

How did Polycompound come to work with nanomaterials?
Peter Imhof: To some extent that has something to do with me. In 2004 I was working as Product-Manager with a well-known company trading in polymers, raw materials and fine chemicals in Basel, where I came into contact with nano products for the first time in the field of phyllosilicates. In 2008 I had the privilege of presenting the first version of the safety matrix for nanomaterials in Bern, where I was one of the first people from industry to offer practical experience. In 2009 I moved to Polycompound and remained true to nanotechnology. Besides phyllosilicates and CNTs, nanosilver was also a topic of interest. Other additives in the nano field, such as flame retardants, came along later.

What are carbon nanotubes actually used for?
CNTs can reinforce a material or increase its electrical conductivity. Soot is usually added to cables to make then conductive. But the soot also reduces their flexibility and makes the cables more brittle. When CNTs are added, the same conductivity can be achieved with a much lower concentration and without essentially altering the mechanical properties, making the cables more durable. CNTs are used in a variety of applications, especially when the product has to meet more stringent requirements without the positive properties of the basic material being lost. The problem is that additives with nanotubes are still very expensive. This is a psychological barrier – as are the safety issues that remain to be clarified and the uncertainty surrounding nanomaterials.

report Production Technologies

Austausch unlimited: Grenzüberschreitende Industrie 4.0

07.11.2017

report Micro, Nano & Materials

L’apport des matériaux hautes performances dans le développement de composants et d’outils...

06.11.2017

report ICT

«Open Data ist auch ein Innovationsimpuls»

05.03.2015

Mit der «Open Government Data Strategie Schweiz» ist der erste Schritt getan. Mehr Offenheit vom Staat wünscht sich Opendata.ch-Mitgründer Hannes Gassert nun auch bei der Beschaffung und findet: «Die grössten Cracks sollten an den grössten Herausforderungen arbeiten – und solche hat der Staat.»

Inwiefern hat das öffentlich zugänglich machen von Daten wirklich etwas mit Innovation zu tun? Geht es nicht primär um Transparenz?
Hannes Gassert: Daten sind der Treibstoff der Wissensgesellschaft. Und die öffentliche Hand hat viele wertvolle, aber nicht personenbezogene Daten. Es ist wichtig, dass diese für alle zugänglich gemacht werden. Doch nicht nur «draussen» bei den Start-ups, KMU und NGO kann dies innovative neue Ansätze möglich machen. Auch verwaltungsintern wirkt Open Data. Wir stellen immer wieder fest, dass Open-Data-Projekte zum Nachdenken zwingen: Welche Daten haben wir überhaupt, woher kommen sie und warum sind sie wertvoll?

Besteht für die öffentliche Hand bezüglich Offenheit der Daten eine Verpflichtung?
Nein. Wichtig ist zuerst einmal, staatlichen Stellen überhaupt die Möglichkeit zu geben, mit der Open Data Community zusammenzuarbeiten, bevor es um Zwänge oder Verpflichtungen geht. Aber natürlich: Die Daten der öffentlichen Hand sollen offene Daten sein und der Öffentlichkeit in geeigneter Form auch zugänglich gemacht werden. Es sei denn, übergeordnete Interessen wie etwa der Persönlichkeitsschutz haben Vorrang. Wohlgemerkt, wir sprechen hier immer von Daten im engeren Sinn, von maschinenlesbaren, nicht personenbezogenen Sammlungen – dazu gehören Karten, Fahrpläne oder Wetterdaten, nicht aber Bundesratsprotokolle und andere Dokumente aus dem Entscheidungsprozess. Die Transparenzfrage stellt sich dort ganz anders. Das Anliegen von Opendata.ch ist es, auf Basis der Daten von Bund, Kantonen und Gemeinden ein faires Innovationsökosystem zu schaffen, indem alle gleich lange Spiesse haben.
Jüngst hat beispielsweise Google bei der SBB nach den Plänen der Bahnhöfe nachgefragt. Damit will Google die Indoor-Navigation ausbauen. Die SBB hat die Daten nicht herausgerückt. Für ein Start-up wäre dies dann auch schon das Ende der Fahnenstange. Google dagegen kann die Bahnhöfe auch selbst erfassen.

Wie macht sich die Schweiz im internationalen Vergleich bezüglich Open Data?
Die Schweiz befindet sich in Europa im hinteren Mittelfeld. Das hat auch mit unserer föderalen Struktur zu tun. Wenn in den USA oder in Grossbritannien ein neuer Präsident oder Premierminister an die Macht kommt, kann er einfach mal proklamieren: «Wir machen jetzt Open Data!» In der Schweiz geht vieles langsamer, dafür sind die Errungenschaften umso stabiler. Derzeit werden gerade eine Reihe von Gesetzgebungen in Bezug auf die Open-Data-Möglichkeiten unter die Lupe genommen. Grundsätzlich geht es aber nicht nur um Gesetze – wichtiger ist der Kulturwandel.

Und der findet allmählich statt?
Ein Anfang ist gemacht. Es gibt nun die «Open Government Data Strategie Schweiz» und ein zuständiges Team innerhalb der Bundesverwaltung. Die Rede ist hier notabene nicht von «Open Data Bund», sondern von «Open Data Schweiz». Will heissen, dass der Bund die Datenplattform betreibt, die dann auch von den Kantonen und Gemeinden für die Offenlegung von Daten genutzt werden kann.

Und warum sollten die Behörden dies tun?
Transparenz schafft Vertrauen. Wer so gut, so genau und korrekt arbeitet wie die Schweizer Behörden, hat viel mehr Chancen als Risiken. Oft wird aber leider davon ausgegangen, dass mehr Transparenz bloss zu mehr Behörden-Bashing führt.

Rankings zu Ärzten oder Spitalleistungen sind aber schon auch problematisch?
Nein, das ist durchaus im Sinne des Bürgers. In Grossbritannien haben solche Rankings zu einer drastischen Reduktion von Spitalinfektionen geführt. Auch für die Schweiz sind entsprechende offene Daten kein Ding der Unmöglichkeit. Wichtig ist, dass wir immer anonymisierte Daten meinen, wenn wir von Open Data sprechen. Von daher sind Ärzteratings oder Lehrerranglisten nicht das Ziel.

Open Data ist ja stark gekoppelt an Open Innovation. Wäre der Staat nicht dafür prädestiniert, über neue Formen der Zusammenarbeit auch neue Ideen zu kreieren?
Sicher, Partizipation und Innovation gehen Hand in Hand. Hackdays, wie wir sie von Opendata.ch organisieren, sind ein Paradebeispiel für Open Innovation und sehr erfolgreich. Indem verschiedene Leute aus allen möglichen Disziplinen zusammenkommen – darunter Designer, Programmierer, Berater, Journalisten oder hoch spezialisierte Fachleute und Forscher –, um während einer kurzen Zeit intensiv an einer Idee zu arbeiten, entstehen viele neue Einsichten, Ideen, Projekte und manchmal gar Produkte. Das ist für alle Beteiligten sehr produktiv.

Dafür braucht es die Offenheit der Behörden, und zwar über das Datenformat hinaus. Wird das auch als Risiko empfunden?
Nun, die IT-Beschaffung des Bundes ist nach diversen Fehlschlägen ja in aller Munde: Das Risiko aber lag dort kaum je in zu viel Innovation oder zu viel Offenheit. Im Gegenteil. Es geht darum, die besten Ideen und die besten Köpfe ins Boot zu holen. Ein gutes Beispiel ist «Obamacare». So hat man die zentrale Plattform, healthcare.gov, zunächst genau so umgesetzt, wie man dies auch hierzulande machen würde. Grosse Spezifikation, viele Berater, klassische IT-Grossdienstleister. Dies führte – wie so oft – zu einem Debakel. Doch jetzt läuft die Sache. Und warum? Weil Obama seine Hacker mit den Kapuzenpullis, die ihn schon im Wahlkampf unterstützt haben, ins Weisse Haus geholt und ihnen volle Unterstützung gegeben hat.

Hat der Staat Angst vor den Geeks?
Aber ja, und nicht nur der Staat. Geeks, wie Sie sie nennen, haben nun mal spezielle Fähigkeiten, und diese wollen sie nicht nur für die Entwicklung von trivialen Games und noch mehr Social-Media-Plattformen einsetzen, sondern auch im Dienste des Gemeinwesens. Der Begriff der Community ist ja nicht umsonst sehr wichtig in diesen Szenen. Bei der öffentlichen Hand gibt es grosse Herausforderungen zu lösen, und dazu sind die Fähigkeiten von Geeks gefragt. In den USA jedenfalls ist zu beobachten, dass die Start-up-Szene sich immer mehr in sogenannte Govware-Projekte involviert. Die Verwaltungs-EDV gilt bei jungen Talenten ja sonst eher als langweilig. Viele halten sich an das durch Leute wie Steve Jobs oder Tim O’Reilly genährte Mantra: Arbeitet an Dingen, die wirklich wichtig sind – «work on stuff that matters!» Und da muss unser Gemeinwesen natürlich weit oben auf der Liste stehen. Wir sollten es hinkriegen, dass die grössten Cracks auch an den grössten Herausforderungen arbeiten.

Sind der öffentlichen Hand nicht die Hände gebunden? So muss man sich ja an die WTO halten.
Um etwas mehr Innovation hineinzubringen, müssen wir nicht die Regeln des Welthandels umkrempeln. Vorschläge dafür gibt es bereits zur Genüge. Ein wichtiger Punkt ist auch hier Transparenz. Dank offengelegten Beschaffungsdaten können disfunktionale Muster erkannt und durchbrochen werden.

Hannes Gassert ist Unternehmer sowie Aktivist und Kurator an der Schnittstelle von Technologie, Medien und Kultur. Er ist im Editorial Board der Lift Conference, Vorstandsmitglied von Opendata.ch und /ch/open, im Verwaltungsrat von Liip sowie Partner bei der Crowdfunding-Plattform wemakeit.com und Mitgründer von skim.com.
Hannes Gassert studierte Informatik und Medienwissenschaften an der Universität Fribourg. Noch während des Studiums gründete er 2003 den Webdienstleister Liip mit, dessen Wachstum er als Geschäftsleitungsmitglied bis 2010 mitprägte.

Interview: swiss made software, geführt von Thomas Brenzikofer
Erschienen in der Publikation «swiss made software – Public Innovation»

report Micro, Nano & Materials

Solvatec installs prize-winning solar energy system

31.10.2017

report Life Sciences

The European Antibody Congress opens its doors

17.10.2017

report BaselArea.swiss

Domenico Scala: «The Basel region is clearly undersold»

28.01.2015

In Domenico Scala, former CEO of Nobel Biocare, CFO at Syngenta and Group Treasurer of Roche, i-net appointed an experienced top manager from the life sciences industry as its president at the beginning of 2015. In an interview with «i-net Innovation report» Scala explains why Northwest Switzerland as an innovation hub for the life sciences should do more on its own account – and not only in terms of communication.

When it comes to innovation, US companies and startups leave the rest of the world standing. Why is this?
Domenico Scala: Is that really true? I’m not a fan of sweeping statements. I also don’t believe that we in Switzerland or in Europe are less innovative than the USA. But the fact is that the USA is very much more successful in the commercialization of innovation and, above all, also in self-presentation. The list of technical achievements developed in Europe but successfully launched on the market in the USA is long. Just think of the World Wide Web. And in medical technology it is largely American companies that are dominant today. This looked completely different ten years ago. Plant gene technology is also no longer a topic in Europe today, although we once led the world here.

The last example you mention has to do mainly with stricter regulations. An innovation killer?
Regulatory factors of course play a role. Plant gene technology was rejected in Europe. Today more than 80 percent of global soya and maize production is genetically modified. These products are also consumed by Europeans. When you look at it like this, people have quite clearly been cutting off their nose to spite their face. But the main difference between the USA and Europe is to be found elsewhere: historically, Europe’s economy has been built on debt ever since the Second World War. On the other hand, the USA has always set great store by entrepreneurship and venture capital.

Can you be more explicit?
The cantonal banks in Switzerland were founded in the 19th century to finance the development of infrastructure. What do the cantonal banks do today? They provide mortgages and that’s it. The venture capital function virtually no longer exists. In the pension funds, 60 percent of the money is invested in bonds and 40 percent in the stocks of listed companies. But in the USA, a much higher proportion of assets is invested in the establishment of new companies through venture funds.

The consequence of this system is that it supports the structure-preserving forces in Europe, from which mainly established companies benefit. And these companies less innovative. Is that also how you see it?
I’m constantly hearing that big companies are not innovative. But is that true? The perception in Basel should actually be quite different. We still have two mega-companies here today that have been among the most successful pharmaceutical companies in the world for decades thanks to their innovativeness. Most innovations in chemistry were driven by European companies, including also major companies from Northwest Switzerland. I don’t believe the size of a company alone is decisive – Apple and Google are also big companies. It is rather a question of mentality. Large companies are also more likely to take risks.

Does this mean we’ve lost our culture of innovation in Europe?
Yes, and this is drummed in at an early age. In the USA, it already begins with education: Americans largely have to pay for their education themselves. So for them even the university degree represents an investment that they somehow have to finance and that should eventually also pay off. And it does not stop there. The universities, too, are constantly seeking funds to finance their projects. Every president of a private US university gets up in the morning and tells himself: «Today I have to find ten million dollars.» There are no blank checks. This creates pressure, of course, and ultimately leads to innovators having to be very much more consistent in the commercial focus of their projects. This is lacking here. The Federal Institute of Technology and the Biozentrum of Basel University can match up to the best in the world academically. But when it comes to the number of spin-offs, then they are mediocre at most. Both systems have their pros and cons. The fact is simply that, in this way, more startups emerge from universities in the USA than here with us.

Universities are not the only resource of new companies. Basilea and Actelion are examples of very successful spin-offs of large companies. Should we not focus there instead?
That’s certainly an interesting idea. Innovations in established structures do indeed have a difficult time of it. There’s a lot of truth in the view that if you have a really innovative idea in a big corporation, you should push ahead with it unnoticed for as long as possible. In many large companies, more innovations are shot down than are driven forwards. For me, Kodak is the most striking example: They had all the patents for digital photography and still they let themselves get wrong-footed.

How can this be prevented? What can state-run innovation promotion organization like i-net do?
The question is whether a big corporation even allows the spin-off of an idea that it does not want to pursue further or not. Ultimately they never know whether the project might not perhaps be of benefit and at the same time they don’t want to create a potential competitor. So there are far fewer spin-offs from big companies than you might actually expect and would probably also be possible. When it comes down to it, such spin-offs also have to be decided and implemented top down. This is exactly how it happened with Actelion and Basilea. Bottom-up is much less feasible.

Unless there is sufficient venture capital and a suitable infrastructure, as well as other support services for entrepreneurs, such as coaching. This is precisely one of the objectives behind promoting start-ups. Do you see a conflict of interests with big industry?
An economist would say the state should keep its nose out of it and leave such developments to the market. But there is also a reservation: The market is focused on the short term; innovations on the other hand need the long-term view. New things don’t emerge from one day to the next. From the idea through proof of concept and funding to market launch quite often takes more than a decade. To this extent it is certainly not wrong if state institutions get involved here with the injection of appropriate resources in the right place.

And where will you apply the levers in future as president of i-net?
Basically, i-net is well positioned. I find it right, for example, that the emphasis is on the thematic promotion of innovation. And the choice of technology fields is right as well. The focus of i-net is on the networking of people and topics; this is an important service that cannot be provided in this form by the private sector. Many innovations today occur at the interface between the various technology fields. By offering a neutral platform here for the exchange of ideas and stimulating cooperation, i-net can make an important contribution to the future development of our economic region.
To some extent, Basel is something of a «one-trick Pony» and largely dependent on the life sciences.

How important do you think it is for a business center to strive for a certain diversification in this respect?
You can see the focus as a course or as a blessing. On the one hand the two big corporations absorb a lot of resources and talents. On the other they also create a lot of value and prestige from which our economic region can profit. I think we should look to this strength and use it as a springboard to new fields. For example, Roche employs more than a thousand ICT specialists in this region alone. That is already an outstanding basis for further development at the interface between life sciences and ICT. I believe there are dozens of such interesting fields that it would be worth advancing.

And how do you see Northwest Switzerland positioned in the global competition for inward investment?
The region is clearly undersold. Basel is not widely perceived as an innovation hotspot for the life sciences. The fact that we are should be much better communicated. In this, too, the Americans are unfortunately a step ahead. But it doesn’t have to stay that way.

Interview: Thomas Brenzikofer and Nadine Nikulski, i-net

report Production Technologies

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report Life Sciences

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report Medtech

Industry 4.0 – what’s the impact on other sectors?

28.01.2015

On January 22, 2015, NZZ published a very interesting set of articles about the silent revolution in industry and production: industry 4.0 is the digital interlinking of production and value chains (see links below).

The revolutionary phases in industrial production were the introduction of the steam engine and water power, which allowed mechanized fabrication (industry 1.0), the invention of the conveyor-belt, which allowed mass production (industry 2.0), and computers and robots, which enabled automated production (industry 3.0). And today, the next industrial revolution is enabling the physical and virtual systems to be merged through the internet of everything (industry 4.0). The results of digital production are the vertical interlinking of intelligent production systems (smart factories) and the horizontal integration of global value chains, including suppliers and customers.

The sensing of everything becomes reality – not only in production, but also in mobility (self-driving car), in health (quantified self), in logistics (real-time tracking) or in finance (high-frequency trading). But this is only the tip of the iceberg. Sensing and listening (in terms of data exchange) will inform every aspect of what we do. But how do we get the essentials from the vast, unstructured data and how can we benefit from this becoming more effective, more sustainable, more innovative, improving safety, reducing risks and finally improving our habits?

Apart of sensors and data storage, we also require smart brains and emulation power, such as lateral thinking, lean management (bad processes remain bad, even if they become smart through the latest technology) and expert systems (smart and self-learning algorithms based on large data sets, which make decisions without human interaction). The future is bright; some potential advantages include the prediction of failure and conflicts (and thus hopefully their prevention), the personalization of products, services and therapies, automatic maintenance, self-organized logistics, the share economy, energy efficiency in all aspects of our life and so on.

The threats and challenges are also enormous: Data privacy, protection against industrial espionage, data security measures, data banking and so on. Sound solutions are required. We have a lot of opportunities in Switzerland from the internet of everything and expert systems, not only in industry, but in all manner of applications for our daily life. Swiss data banking and Swiss secure cloud are two such potential opportunities. Learn about more the opportunities from the i-net Technology Trend Forum and the i-net technology and business related events.

Related NZZ articles:
«Das Internet kommt in die Fabrik»
«Evolution statt Revolution»
«Auf dem Weg in die Arbeitswelt 2.0»

i-net related information:
Article about the i-net Tech Trend Forum
List of i-net Events

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07.08.2017

report BaselArea.swiss

Michael Bornhäusser: «Schweizer Start-ups werkeln zu lange in der Comfort-Zone vor sich he...

03.04.2014

Als Gründungspräsident war Michael Bornhäusser der Spiritus Rector von i-net. Nach seinem Rücktritt im Februar 2014 wird sich der Serial Entrepreneur als ehrenamtliche Leiter auf den i-net Bereich Finance & Partner Netzwerk konzentrieren.

Im Interview erklärt Michael Bornhäusser, warum die Schweiz in vielen Bereichen vom internationalen Venture Capital gemieden wird und was in der Startup-Förderung zu tun ist, damit sich dies ändert. Michael Bornhäusser ist Mitinhaber der Basler Sallfort Privatbank und leitet dort den Bereich Private Equity, Products & Service.

Herr Bornhäusser, als zurücktretender Gründungs-Präsident von i-net überlassen Sie ihr Kind nun seinem Lauf. Wie sind Sie mit der Entwicklung zufrieden?
Michael Bornhäusser: Im grossen und ganzen können wir sehr zufrieden sein mit dem erreichten. Operativ sind wir gut aufgestellt, das Team funktioniert. Wir haben innerhalb von knapp zwei Jahren unser Netzwerk auf über 5500 Personen verdoppelt und mit rund 50 Veranstaltungen im vergangen Jahr 2500 Teilnehmende erreicht. i-net wird heute in der gesamten Region Nordwestschweiz wahrgenommen. Wo wir uns sicher noch verstärken müssen, ist in der Startup-und Investorenszene.

Wo sehen sie künftig die Schwerpunkte von i-net?
Es muss uns nun gelingen, noch mehr Multiplikatoren an Board zu holen, indem wir den Kreis von Ehrenamtlichen, die in unserem Netzwerk tatkräftig mitwirken wollen, vergrössern. Auch bei der Gründung neuer Unternehmen muss i-net eine noch wichtigere Rolle spielen als bislang.

Als Vielreisender haben Sie den Vergleich: Wo sehen Sie die Stärken in der Region Nordwestschweiz?
Biotech und Life Sciences sind ganz klar unser USP. Allerdings gewinnt die Interdisziplinarität zu unseren anderen Technologiefeldern, ICT, Cleantech, Medtech oder Nanotechnologien an Bedeutung.

Und wo sehen Sie die Schwächen der Region?
Die grosse Schwäche in der Nordwestschweiz sind die Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen. Es werden einfach zu wenige Spin-offs generiert, weil man im Bereich Company Building kaum Kompetenzen hat. i-net müsste hier unbedingt in die Bresche springen und aktiver auf diese Institutionen zugehen. Umgekehrt müssen sich die Universitäten und Fachhochschulen gegenüber diesem Thema öffnen. Im Zweifelsfall geht dies halt nicht ohne politischen Druck.

Was meinen Sie damit genau?
In Extremis müsste man halt den Geldhahn abstellen. Neben der Bildung und Forschung gehört es doch ganz klar mit zum Leistungsauftrag einer Universität, im Innovationsbereich Wertschöpfung zu schaffen. Nun sind Universitätsprofessoren in der Regel keine Unternehmer und das ist bis zu einem bestimmten Grad ja auch richtig so. Aber es braucht eben auch die Einsicht seitens dieser Institutionen, dass dem so ist, und dass es Partnerorganisationen braucht, die diesen Teil ihres Leistungsauftrages - nämlich das Unternehmertum zu fördern - besser machen.

An den Universitäten in den USA ist das aber anders, dort spielt Entrepreneurship eine gewichtige Rolle und man ist auch erfolgreich darin?
Das liegt daran, dass diese Universitäten sehr stark auf Fremdfinanzierung und damit von Spenden ehemaliger Studenten angewiesen sind. Deshalb hat eine amerikanische Hochschule auch ein grosses Selbstinteresse daran, dass aus Absolventen erfolgreiche Unternehmer werden. Denn diese werden später aus Dankbarkeit für die Ausbildung und aus gesellschaftlicher Verpflichtung, einen Teil ihres Erfolges an die Uni zurückgeben. Bei uns hingegen bekommt es schnell einmal ein «Geschmäckle», wenn etwa eine Bank einer Hochschule Geld zur Verfügung stellen.

Sie finden also das US-Modell besser. Immerhin gilt die Schweiz in allen Rankings punkto Ausbildungsstand ihrer Arbeitskräfte als Spitzenreiter?
Schon, aber laut diversester Ranking befinden sich die besten Universitäten der Welt in den USA sowie in England. Das angelsächsische Prinzip funktioniert also. Und es ist auch so, dass die angelsächsischen Länder die erfolgreichsten Neugründungen hervorbringen. Es ist schwierig hierzulande einen qualitativ hochwertigen Deal Flow für Investoren aufzubauen. Ganz anderes in den USA und England. Dort gibt es professionelle Setups, vielversprechende Cases mit grossem Gewinnpotenzial.

Aber Start-ups werden doch nicht ausschliesslich an Universitäten generiert?
Deshalb ist es in meinen Augen auch ein grosser Fehler, dass man hierzulande in der Startup-Förderung so eindeutig auf Universitäten fokussiert. Wir haben bereits festgestellt, dass - den Biotech-Bereich mal ausgenommen - die Erfolgsaussichten von Schweizer Start-ups, die direkt an Universitäten inkubiert wurden, relativ gering sind. Die Universitäten spielen in Relation zu dem, was sie an Förderungsmitteln von der Regierung bekommen, nur eine ganz kleine Rolle. Die erfolgreichsten Startups gemessen am Unternehmenswert beim Exit sind universitätsunabhängig als Spin-offs von Grossunternehmen entstehen. Typische Beispiel aus der Region Basel sind etwa Actelion oder Polyphor.

Fehlt es nicht einfach an Entrepreneurial Spirit?
Eindeutig. Die Ambitionen sind meist zu tief und die Unternehmen werden zu früh verkauft. Man gibt sich zufrieden, wenn man mit einem Startup ein paar Millionen Franken Umsatz erzielt und beim Verkauf einen tiefen zweistelligen Millionenbetrag löst. Deshalb ist die Schweizer Startup-Szene für global agierende Venture Capitalists nicht interessant. Diese steigen erst ein, wenn ein Exil dreistelliger Millionenhöhe in Aussicht steht. Schweizer Startups sollten ihre Ziele höher stecken. Doch dazu braucht es die entsprechenden Vorgaben der Investoren. Leider muss ich immer wieder beobachten, dass viele Startups hierzulande zu lange in der Comfort-Zone vor sich her werkeln können, weil die Business Angels zu viel Geld geben und zu wenig Druck machen.

Ist es nicht gar kontraproduktiv, wenn in der Schweiz einfach nur Unternehmen produziert werden, um sie später ins Ausland zu verkaufen. Dadurch wird doch keine nachhaltige Wertschöpfung generiert?
Das kann man auch anders sehen. Wenn wir in der Schweiz 10 Exits für 100 Millionen schaffen, dann sind das 1 Milliarde Wertschöpfung, die generiert werden und von dem ein grosser Teil in unserem Land bleibt. Als CH-Hightech KMU muss man sich sowie so von Anfang an global aufstellen. Hier hat die Schweiz aufgrund der existierenden Strukturen einen riesigen Vorteil.

Es gibt aber viele Unternehmer, die gar nicht mit VC-Geld aufgepumpt werden wollen um dann verkauft zu werden, sondern auf organisches Wachstum setzen. Ist das nicht auch legitim?
Natürlich. Als Gründer muss man sich einfach überlegen, was man will. i-net versteht sich ja keineswegs nur als Start-up-Plattform, wir bieten unsere Services ja auch dem klassischen KMU. Hierbei gilt es, Unternehmern ihre Wachstums- und Innovationspotentiale aufzuzeigen und sie mit unserem Netzwerk darin zu unterstützen, diese zu realisieren.

Dennoch, braucht es auch da Fremdfinanzierung. Gibt es denn keine Alternative zu Private Equity?
Die aktuelle Regulierungsvorgabe, Basel III, macht es tatsächlich sehr schwierig für eine Bank, Wachstumsvorhaben zu finanzieren, da sie in der Pflicht stehen, sehr viel mehr Eigenkapital hinterlegen zu müssen. Im Prinzip erhält ein Unternehmen nur noch dann Kredit, wenn es das Geld sowieso schon hat. Die Politik hat da im Prinzip einen Investitionsstopp veranlasst, mit dem Effekt, dass Expansionsvorhaben nur noch über Private Equity finanziert werden können. Gerade dies stellt die Schweiz vor grosse Herausforderungen. Deshalb müssen wir auch dringend attraktiver werden für das global agierenden Venture Capital. Und nochmals: dies gelingt nur, wenn unsere Unternehmen und ihre Business Angels aggressiver werden.
Ich habe kürzlich gelesen, dass 80 bis 90 Prozent aller Angel Investments hierzulande verloren gehen. Bei professionellen Investoren ist es gerade umgekehrt.

Hat das nicht auch damit zu tun, dass VCs später einsteigen, wenn das Risiko geringer ist?
Das sehe ich anders. Es wird meist falsch investiert und die Unternehmer werden nicht richtig unterstützt. Wir müssen dringen professionelle Strukturen schaffen, wie Accelerators und Innovationsparks. Besonders in den Life Sciences könnte man sehr viel mehr tun. In deinem Bereich gibt es zwei Städte die einem einfallen: Boston und Basel. Und ich bin sicher, dass Novartis, Roche oder Actelion sich beteiligen würden an einem entsprechenden Programm. Denn ein solches bringt auch für sie noch mehr Know-How in die Region, von dem sie wiederum profitieren können.

Und die anderen Technologiefelder?
Auch in den Nanotechnologien sehe grosses unmittelbares Potenzial. Bei den anderen Bereichen wird der Aufbau sehr viel länger dauern. Aber nichtsdestotrotz sollte man das machen. Zudem gibt es zwischen den Bereichen interessante Berührungspunkte, die man ausschöpfen sollte. Und hierzu können wir mit i-net die ideale Plattform bieten.

Interview: Thomas Brenzikofer

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