Innovation Report

 
report Life Sciences

“The Basel region should not simply be part of the transformation, but should be helping t...

07.12.2016

Dr Falko Schlottig is Director of the School of Life Sciences at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Northwest Switzerland (FHNW), in Muttenz. He advises start-up companies in the life sciences and has founded start-ups himself.

In our interview, he explains how the School of Life Sciences would like to develop, why close interdisciplinary collaboration is so important and what future he foresees for the health system.

You come from industry and have also been engaged in start-ups yourself. Is it not atypical now to work in the academic field?
Falko Schlottig*:
If it were atypical, we would be doing something wrong as a university of applied sciences. Many of the staff at the FHNW come from industry. That’s important, because otherwise we could not provide an education that qualifies students for their profession and because through this network we can drive applied research and development forwards. With our knowledge and know-how we can make a significant contribution to product developments and innovation processes.

Is this how the FHNW differs from the basic research done at universities?
It’s not about making political distinctions, but about a technical differentiation. As a university of applied sciences, we are focused on technology, development and products. The focus of universities and the ETH lies in the field of basic research. Together this results in a unique value chain that goes beyond the life sciences cluster of Northwest Switzerland. This requires good collaboration. At the level of our lecturers and researchers, this collaboration works outstandingly well, for example through the sharing of lectures and numerous joint projects. On the other hand, there is still a lot of potential in the collaboration to strengthen the life sciences cluster further, for instance in technology-oriented education or in the field of personalized health.

Does “potential” mean recognition? Or is it a question of funding?
Neither nor! The distinction between applied research and basic research must not become blurred – also from the students’ perspective. A human resources manager has to know whether the applicant has had a practice-oriented education or first has to go through a trainee programme. It’s a question of working purposefully together in technology-driven fields even better than we do today in the interest of our region.

Are there enough students? It’s often said there are too few scientists?
Our student numbers are slightly increasing at the moment, but we would like to see some more growth. But the primary focus is on the quality of education and not on the quantity. What is important for our students is that they continue to have excellent chances on the jobs market. Like all institutions, however, we are feeling the current lack of interest in the natural sciences. For this reason, we at the FHNW are committed in all areas of education to subjects in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics - or STEM subjects.

You have now been head of the School of Life Sciences at the FHNW for just over a year. What plans do you have?
We want to remain an indispensable part of the life sciences cluster of Northwest Switzerland. We also want to continue providing a quality of education which ensures that 98 percent of our students can find a job after graduation. In concrete terms, this means that we keep developing our teaching in terms of content, didactics and structure and follow the developments of the industrial environment and of individualization with due sense of proportion. In this respect, we’ve managed to attract people with experience in the strategic management of companies in the industrial field and people from institutions in the healthcare and environment sectors to assist us on our advisory board.
In research, we will organize ourselves around technologies based on our disciplinary strengths and expertise in the future and will be even more interdisciplinary in our work. We will be helped by the fact that we are moving to a new building in the autumn of 2018 and will have one location instead of two. In terms of content, we will establish the subject of “digital transformation” as an interdisciplinary field in teaching and research with much greater emphasis than is the case today. Finally, we should not simply be part of this transformation, but should be helping to shape it.

Apropos “digital transformation”, IT will also become increasingly important for natural sciences. Will the FHNW train more computer scientists?
Here at the School of Life Sciences we are successfully focused on medical informatics; the FHNW is training computer scientists in Brugg and business IT specialists in Basel. But we also have to ask ourselves what a chemist who has attended the School of Life Sciences at the FHNW should also offer in the way of advanced IT know-how in future – for example in data sciences. The same applies to our bioanalytics specialists, pharmaceutical technology specialists and process and environmental engineers. Nevertheless, natural science must remain the basis, enriched with a clear understanding of data and related processes. Conversely, an IT specialist who studies with us at the School of Life Sciences also has to come to grips with natural science issues. This knowledge is essential if you want to find a life sciences job in the region.

Throughout Switzerland – but also especially in the Basel region – there is a lot of know-how in bioinformatics. But from the outside, the region is not perceived as an IT centre. Should something not be done to counteract this perception?
We do indeed have some catching up to do in the life sciences cluster of Northwest Switzerland. The important questions are what priorities to focus on and how to link them up. Is it data mining – which is important for the University of Basel and the University Hospital? Or is it the linking of patient data with the widest variety of databases in order to raise cost-effectiveness in hospitals, for example? Or does the future lie in data sciences and data visualization to simplify and support planning and decision-making, which is one of the things we are already doing at the School of Life Sciences? The key issue is to know what data will serve as the basis of future decision-making in healthcare. Here it is also a question of who the data belongs to and both how and by whom the data may be used. This is one of the prerequisites for new business models. Since we are engaged in applied research, these issues are just as important for us as they are for industry. This hugely exciting discussion will remain with us for some years to come.

The School of Life Sciences at the FHNW covers widely differing areas such as chemistry, environmental technology, nanoscience and data visualization – how does it all fit together?
It is only at first glance that these areas seem so different – their basis is always natural science, often in conjunction with engineering science. The combining of our disciplines will be even better when they are all brought together in 2018, at the very latest. You can see it already, for example, in environmental technology: at first glance, you wonder what it has to do with bioanalytics, nanoscience or computer science. But the School of Life Sciences is strong in the field of water analysis and bioanalytics, and one of the biggest problems at the moment is antibiotic resistance. To find solutions here, you need a knowledge of chemistry, biology, analytics, computer science and also process engineering know-how. As from 2018/19 we will have a unique process and technology centre in the new building, where we will be able to visualize all the process chains driving the life sciences industry today and in the future – from chemistry, through pharmaceutical technology and environmental technology to biotechnology, including analytics and automation.

You’ve been - and still are - involved in start-ups. Will spin-offs from the School of Life sciences be encouraged in future?
We are basically not doing badly today when you compare the number of students and staff with the number of start-ups. But we do like to encourage young spin-off companies; at our school, start-ups tend to spring from the ideas of our teaching staff. Our Bachelor students have hardly any time to devote themselves to starting up a company. On the other hand, entrepreneurial thinking and engagement form part of the education provided at the School of Life Sciences. After all, our students should also develop an understanding of the way a company works. A second aspect is entrepreneurial thinking in relation to founding a company. The founding of a start-up calls for flexibility and openness on our part: How do we deal with a patent application? Who does it belong to? How are royalties arranged? Our staff have the freedom to develop their own projects. Our task is to define the necessary framework conditions. We already offer the possibility today of a start-up remaining on our premises and continuing to use these facilities. We have reserved extra space for this in the new building. We also make use of all the opportunities that the life sciences cluster of Northwest Switzerland offers today. This includes, for example, the life sciences start-up agency EVA, the incubator, Swiss Biotech, Swissbiolabs, the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area, BaselArea.swiss and also venture capitalists, to name just a few. We are well-networked, and here too we are doing what we can to help foster the development of our region

Why do you think it is apparently so difficult in Switzerland to establish a successful start-up?
There are two factors in Northwest Switzerland that play a part: a very successful medium-sized and large life sciences industry means the hurdles to becoming independent are much higher. When you found a start-up, you give up a secure, well-paid job and expose yourself to the possible financial risks associated with the start-up. The second big hurdle is funding, especially overcoming the so-called Valley of Death. Compared with the second step, it is easy to obtain seed capital. Persevering all the way to market with a capital requirement of between one and five million francs is very difficult.

That should change with the future fund.
It would of course be fantastic if there were a future fund of this kind to provide finance of between one and two million francs. This would finance start-up projects for two or three years. In this respect, it is incredibly exciting, challenging and moving to see the whole value chain from research to product in use, to be familiar with networks and to be involved. Today this is almost only possible with a start-up or a small company. But in the end, every potential founder has to decide whether he or she would prefer to be a wheel or a cog in a wheel.

Will the healthcare sector look dramatically different in five or ten years?
Forecasts are always difficult and often wrong. The big players will probably wait and see how the market develops. The healthcare sector may well look different in five to ten years, but not disruptively different. We will see new business models, and insurers will try exploring new avenues. This may lead to shifts. At the moment we are experiencing the shift from patient to consumer. On the product side, the sector is extremely regulated, so it is not easy to launch a new and innovative product onto the market. In my view, many regulations inhibit innovation and do not always lead to greater safety for the patients, which is actually what they should do.

How could this transformation be kick-started?
I believe that we at the University of Applied Sciences in Northwest Switzerland have a major contribution to make here. For example, we take an interdisciplinary and inter-university approach collaborating on socio-economic issues based on our disciplinary expertise within strategic initiatives. In this way we are trying to our part to help find solutions or answers. Switzerland and our region in particular have huge potential in this pool of collaboration. This now needs to be exploited.

Interview: Thomas Brenzikofer and Nadine Nikulski, BaselArea.swiss

*Prof. Dr. Falko Schlottig is Director of the School of Life Sciences at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW) in Muttenz. He has many years of experience in research and product development and has held a variety of management positions in leading international medical device companies. Falko Schlottig has also co-founded a start-up company in the biotechnology and medical devices sector.

He studied Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry. He holds an Executive MBA from the University of St Gallen.

 

report Innovation

So navigieren Unternehmen die Digitale Transformation

03.12.2018

report Invest in Basel region

New campus strengthens bi-cantonal partnership

18.10.2018

report Production Technologies

Keime und Antibiotikaresistenzen – ein Eventthema, das uns alle betrifft

05.10.2016

Bereits zum siebten Mal findet am 25. Oktober 2016 der eintägige Event aus der Reihe der Wassertechnologie statt, den BaselArea.swiss gemeinsam mit der Hochschule für Life Sciences der Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (HLS FHNW) organisiert. Am diesjährigen Event dreht sich im „Gare du Nord“ in Basel alles um „Keime, Antibiotikaresistenz und Desinfektion in Wassersystemen“.

Die Teilnehmer erleben Vorträge und Diskussionen, Institutionen können sich in der Fachausstellung mit Postern zeigen und so zu vertieften Diskussionen anregen. Ein Schlüssel für den langjährigen Erfolg der Veranstaltungsreihe ist die Kooperation der beiden Partner. Thomas Wintgens vom Institut für Ecopreneurship der HLS FHNW betont: „Uns ist die Zusammenarbeit mit BaselArea.swiss sehr wichtig, weil die Organisation ein regional stark vernetzter Akteur im Bereich von Innovationsthemen ist.“

Man habe eine gute Symbiose zwischen spezifischen, fachlichen Kompetenzen und dem Wissen über Themen und Akteure gefunden. „Auch in diesem Jahr ist es uns wieder gelungen, ein komplett neues Thema aufzunehmen“, sagt er. Die Forschungsaktivitäten der Gruppe um Philippe Corvini von der Hochschule für Life Sciences FHNW gaben den ersten Impuls zur diesjährigen Themenwahl.

Philippe Corvini, warum ist das Thema „Keime, Antibiotikaresistenz und Desinfektion in Wassersystemen“ spannend für eine grosse Veranstaltung?
Philippe Corvini: Das Thema ist in den letzten Jahren stärker in den Bereich der Umweltforschung vorgedrungen, immer mehr Arbeitsgruppen beschäftigen sich mit dem Verhalten und Vorkommen von Antibiotikaresistenzen in der Umwelt. Zudem haben auch auf nationaler Ebene die Aktivitäten zugenommen, es gibt ein nationales Forschungsprogramm und eine nationale Strategie zum Umgang mit Antibiotikaresistenzen. In den nächsten Jahren wollen wir intensiver untersuchen, wie sich diese Resistenzen zum Beispiel in biologischen Kläranlagen verhalten und welche Faktoren die Weitergabe von genetischen Informationen, die zu Antibiotikaresistenzen führen, beeinflussen.

Welche neuen Erkenntnisse erwarten die Besucher?
Philippe Corvini:
Wir werden am Event die neuesten Ergebnisse unserer Forschung vorstellen. Bisher wurde eine Resistenz relativ simpel erklärt: In der Umwelt existiert ein Antibiotikum, wodurch sich Resistenz-Gene bilden. Diese werden übertragen, die Resistenz verbreitet sich. Wir haben nun entdeckt, dass resistente Bakterien ein Genom besitzen, das sich weiterentwickelt, so dass sie sich am Ende sogar von Antibiotika ernähren können. Diese resistenten Bakterien bauen also die Antibiotika-Konzentration ab, so dass Bakterien, die sonst empfindlich auf den Wirkstoff reagiert haben, nun im Medium überleben und sogar ihrerseits eine Resistenz entwickeln können. Wir hoffen, künftig die Ausbreitung der Resistenzen bremsen zu können.

Wie könnte man dies schaffen?
Thomas Wintgens:
Wir werden demnächst im Pilotmasstab verschiedene Betriebsweisen von biologischen Kläranlagen untersuchen, um herauszufinden, wie diese Verbreitungswege durch Betriebseinstellungen in den Anlagen beeinflusst werden können. Ausserdem forschen wir an Filtern, welche die antibiotikaresistenten Keime zurückhalten und so die Keimzahl stark reduzieren können.

Warum ist die diesjährige Veranstaltung auch für Laien interessant?
Philippe Corvini:
Ich glaube, fast jeder hat eine Meinung zum Thema Antibiotikaresistenz und viele Leute haben eine Ahnung, wie dringend das Thema ist. Schliesslich betrifft das Thema Gesundheit uns alle.

Ein Fachevent – auch für Laien
Laut Thomas Wintgens dürfen die Teilnehmer viele kompetente Redner erwarten: „Wir freuen uns zudem sehr, dass Helmut Brügmann von der Eawag die nationale Strategie und deren Bedeutung für den Umweltbereich vorstellen wird.“

Generell berührt das Thema Wasser uns alle, weil es unser wichtigstes Lebensmittel ist. Wir konsumieren es als Trinkwasser, über Nahrungsmittel oder nutzen es für unsere persönliche Pflege. Gerade deswegen die Wassertechnologie laut Wintgens ein spannendes Thema für eine öffentliche Veranstaltung: „Wasserqualität ist jedem von uns wichtig und es besteht in der Öffentlichkeit ein grosses Interesse an diesem Thema.“ Gleichzeitig würden die Wassertechnologien aber auch Firmen die Möglichkeit bieten, innovative Produkte zu entwickeln und Stellen zu schaffen.

Seit 2009 Plattform für das regionale Netzwerk
Die HLS FHNW veranstaltet seit 2009 gemeinsam mit i-net/BaselArea.swiss die Veranstaltungsreihe im Bereich Wassertechnologie, welche jährlich rund 120 Teilnehmer anzieht. Die Idee, eine Eventreihe zu starten, entstand aus der Überzeugung heraus, dass Wasser in der Region ein wichtiges Thema ist und hier die Wertschöpfungskette vorhanden ist», so Thomas Wintgens. Jedes Jahr setzten die Verantwortlichen neue Themenschwerpunkte, zum Beispiel Mikroverunreinigungen im Wasserkreislauf, Membranverfahren oder Phosphor-Rückgewinnung. Wintgens erklärt: „Jedes Jahr machen Akteure aus der Forschung, der Technologie oder dem Bereich der Anwendungen mit und präsentieren sich vor Ort“.

Der Plattform-Gedanke war den Initianten von Anfang an wichtig, der Event sollte das regionale Netzwerk stärken und Innovationsvorhaben ermöglichen. Diese Strategie hat sich laut Thomas Wintgens bewährt: „Der Anlass ist ein wichtiger Baustein in unserer Öffentlichkeitsarbeit und wurde zu einem festen Treffpunkt der Interessenten und Kooperationspartnern aus der Region“. Viele Teilnehmer würden den Event schon seit Jahren verfolgen und seien jeweils neugierig auf das Thema im nächsten Jahr.

BaselArea.swiss und die Hochschule für Life Sciences FHNW  (HLS) führen am 25. Oktober im „Gare du Nord“ in Basel ein Symposium unter dem Titel „Keime, Antibiotikaresistenz und Desinfektion in Wassersystemen“ mit Referenten aus den Bereichen Forschung, Verwaltung, Wasserversorgung und Technologieanbieter durch. Eine Anmeldung bis 19.10.2016 ist erforderlich.

report BaselArea.swiss

First semester starts well for FHNW Campus Muttenz

20.09.2018

report Production Technologies

3D printing: rapidly developing technology in life sciences

14.08.2018

report Production Technologies

«Ungenutzte Biomasse hat ökonomisches Potenzial - dieses Bewusstsein ist enorm gewachsen»

09.04.2015

«Biotechnological use of untapped biomass for the future bioeconomy of Switzerland» heisst der i-net Cleantech Technology Event, der am 21. April 2015 an der Hochschule für Life Sciences FHNW (HLS) in Muttenz stattfindet. Philippe Corvini, Professor für «Environmental Biotechnology» und Leiter des Institutes für Ecopreneurship an der HLS, erklärt im i-net-Interview, warum der Anlass einen Besuch wert ist und welche Chancen die Biotechnologie für die Nordwestschweiz birgt.

Sie leiten das Institut für Ecopreneurship an der Hochschule für Life Sciences an der Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz. Was heisst Ecopreneurship genau?
Philippe Corvini: Der Begriff «Ecopreneurship» verweist auf die Tatsache, dass Umwelttechnologie auch zur effizienteren Ressourcennutzung sowie zu weniger Energieverbrauch beitragen kann und damit auch ökonomisch sinnvoll ist. Das heisst, neben Forschung zu betreiben möchten wir auch zum unternehmerischen Handeln beim Einsatz von Umwelttechnologien anregen. Wir tun dies in drei Bereichen: Bei der Umweltbiotechnologie und Umwelttechnik geht es um den biologischen Abbau und den physikalisch-chemischen Rückhalt von Schadstoffen wie auch um die Rückgewinnung von wertvollen Stoffen. In der Ökotoxikologie untersuchen wir die Effekte von Chemikalien oder neuen Materialien auf Organismen und in der Gruppe für nachhaltiges Ressourcenmanagement geht es um Gesamtbetrachtungen die zu ressourceneffizienter und umweltfreundlicher Produktion führen.

Wie kann Biotechnologie unsere Umweltprobleme lösen?
In der Umweltbiotechnologie macht man sich lebendige Organismen zunutze, die Schadstoffe entweder zurückhalten beziehungsweise akkumulieren oder aber als Nahrung aufnehmen und in weniger toxische Stoffe umwandeln können. Dabei kommen nicht nur Bakterien zum Einsatz, sondern auch Pilze, Algen und andere Pflanzen. Ein gutes Beispiel ist die Abwasserreinigung: Bakterien werden dem Abwasser zugesetzt und ernähren sich, indem sie gewisse Stoffe aus dem Abwasser abbauen. An einem bestimmten Punkt gibt es dann zu viele Bakterien und es entsteht überschüssiger Schlamm. In einem Faulturm wird dieser Schlamm dann von anderen Mikroorganismen verdaut und dabei entsteht Biogas. Ein weiteres Beispiel dafür, wie Biotechnologie Umweltprobleme lösen kann, sind Biofilter: In diesen wirken Bakterien, die sich von Lösungsmitteln aus der Abluft ernähren und so Schadstoffe abbauen.

Durch Biotechnologie versucht man also biochemische Prozesse so zu steuern, dass sie für die Umwelt keine ungünstigen Auswirkungen mehr haben?
Tatsächlich dominieren die Themen «Minimierung der Auswirkungen» und «Sanierung» im Umwelttechnologie-Bereich. Es geht darum, den Schaden, der durch menschliche Aktivitäten entstanden ist, zu minimieren oder rückgängig zu machen. Die Forschung an der Hochschule für Life Sciences FHNW geht aber darüber hinaus. So untersuchen wir auch, wie neue Substanzen, die etwa über Medikamente in die Umwelt gelangen, abgebaut werden können. Von daher haben wir viele Schnittstellen zur pharmazeutischen Biotechnologie. Denn wenn man weiss, wie Bakterien einen Stoff abbauen können, ist das auch für die pharmazeutische Industrie interessant. Ein Beispiel ist das Antibiotikum Sulfamethoxazol. Wir haben ein neues Bakterium gefunden, das infolge einer Genmutation gegenüber Sulfamethoxazol resistent ist und sich sogar von diesem ernähren kann.

Wo sehen Sie derzeit das grösste Potenzial für Umweltbiotechnologie?
Neben den oben erwähnten Einsatzmöglichkeiten bietet die Nutzung von lebenden Mikroorganismen aber noch viel mehr. Sie sind auch wichtige Hilfsmittel, um ungenutzte Ressourcen weiter zu verwerten. Abwasser und Bioabfälle aus agro-industriellen und kommunalen Quellen werden gereinigt, beziehungsweise «hygienisiert», verbrannt oder noch in Biogas umgewandelt. Für die Schweiz am Relevantesten ist sicherlich Holz. Diese Biomassequelle sollte noch besser verwertet werden. Altholz oder Holzabfälle zu verbrennen bedeutet, die stofflichen Verwertungsmöglichkeiten nicht zu nutzen. Im Holz stecken wertvolle Moleküle und chemische Verbindungen, die man extrahieren kann. Neben Zellulose für die Produktion von Bioethanol ist besonders Lignin von grossem Interesse. Dabei handelt es sich um ringförmige Strukturen, die zur Herstellung von Chemikalien für die Industrie sehr wichtig sind. Bis heute werden diese ringförmigen Verbindungen ausschliesslich aus fossilen Quellen gewonnen. Holz wäre hierfür die sehr viel nachhaltigere Ressource.
Vielversprechend ist auch die Konvergenz von Umweltbiotechnologie und neuen Technologien wie die Nanotechnologie. Zum Beispiel kann der Einsatz von Nanomaterialien die biologische Sanierung von ausgelaufenem Öl effizienter machen. Zwar existieren im Meer natürlicherweise Mikroorganismen, die Öl abbauen können. Doch dafür brauchen sie viel Zeit, weil ihr Wachstum durch die Verfügbarkeit von Nährstoffen wie Stickstoff und Phosphor limitiert ist. Durch gezielte Zufuhr der limitierenden Nährstoffe kann die Abbaurate beschleunigen werden. Dies geschieht in der Regel durch Beigabe von herkömmlichem Dünger. Allerdings verdünnt sich dieser im Meer ziemlich schnell. Mit dem HLS-Kollegen Dr. Patrick Shahgaldian haben wir sehr poröse Silica-Partikel, deren Oberfläche wasserabweisend ist, mit Stickstoff und Phosphor gefüllt. Wegen der Eigenschaften dieser Partikel kleben diese dann förmlich am Öl und stellen dort gezielt Stickstoff und Phosphor für das bakterielle Wachstum bereit, was die Abbaurate des Rohöls signifikant erhöht.

Sind solche Anwendungen schon marktreif?
Einige Technologien werden bereits zur Dekontamination von Abwässern im Bergbaubereich, zur Rückgewinnung von Metallen oder für die Fermentierung von Bioabfällen eingesetzt. Zudem springen traditionelle Chemiefirmen hinsichtlich Bioabfallverwertungen auf den Zug auf, und es gibt auch interessante Chancen für Startup-Unternehmen. Generell ist festzustellen, dass derzeit unter dem Begriff Bioökonomie eine sehr diversifizierte Szene mit viel Wachstumspotenzial am Entstehen ist.

Und welche Rolle spielt dabei die Nordwestschweiz?
Es gibt schweizweit, aber auch global gesehen, noch kein etabliertes Bioökonomie-Zentrum. Europa scheint aktuell eine führende Rolle einzunehmen, wobei Asien stark aufholt. Für mich und mein Institut ist die Region Nordwestschweiz sehr interessant, weil wir hier neue Begeisterung für diesen Bereich entfachen können. Das Bewusstsein darüber, dass ungenutzte Biomasse ein ökonomisches Potenzial darstellt, ist in den vergangenen Jahren enorm gewachsen.

Am 21. April 2015 findet an der Hochschule für Life Sciences in Muttenz der i-net Cleantech Technology Event «Biotechnological use of untapped biomass for the future bioeconomy of Switzerland» statt. Was erwartet die Teilnehmer?
Die Veranstaltung, welche die HLS und i-net in Zusammenarbeit mit Swiss Biotech gemeinsam in unserem Haus durchführen, bietet eine tolle Übersicht über die Themen Biotechnologie und Bioökonomie. In den Englischen und Deutschen Referaten geht es um das Potential von Bioökonomie in Europa. Man erfährt von konkreten Beispielen und lernt Zulieferer, Anwendungen oder Forschungsprojekte kennen. Wir hoffen, dass wir interessierte und neugierige Teilnehmer mobilisieren können. Immerhin ist es der erste Anlass in der Region, der sich spezifisch diesem Thema widmet.

Interview: Sébastien Meunier und Nadine Nikulski, i-net

Philippe Corvini ist Professor für «Environmental Biotechnology» und Leiter des Institutes für Ecopreneurship an der Hochschule für Life Sciences FHNW. Er arbeitet an verschiedenen wissenschaftlichen internationalen und nationalen Projekten. Er ist Vize-Präsident der European Federation of Biotechnology und repräsentiert und leitet die Sektion «Environmental Biotechnology». Daneben ist er Scientific Advisor und Mitbegründer der Inofea AG und gehört einem Beratungsgremium des Bundesamtes für Umwelt an. Weiter ist er Co-Leiter der Plattform «Bioresource Technology» des KTI F&E Konsortiums Swiss Biotech und hält zwei Professuren am Yancheng Institute of Environmental Technology and Engineering der Nanjing University.

Philippe Corvini hat in Nancy Biotechnologie studiert und erforschte nach seinem PhD in einem interdisziplinären Projekt in Deutschland, wie Bakterien Schadstoffe abbauen. Er hat die Habilitation an der RWTH Aachen bekommen und hat sich nun an die Universität Basel umhabilitiert.

report Production Technologies

L’impression 3D, des technologies en plein développement dans les sciences de la vie

18.07.2018

report Production Technologies

Industrie 4.0 am südlichen Oberrhein

03.04.2018

Cookies

BaselArea.swiss uses cookies to ensure you get the best service on our website.
By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to the use of cookies.

Ok