Innovation Report

 
report ICT

“A good network is power”

03.04.2018

Melanie Kovacs was frustrated by the IT teaching she got, and developed her own product – Master21. She attributes her success with this not least to her carefully maintained network, which has continued to grow in Basel. Melanie Kovacs and her fellow campaigners use the technology and innovation network “We Shape Tech” to promote diversity by making women working in the technology and innovation field more visible.

Ms Kovacs, you founded Master21 when you were 28. How did that come about?

As a co-initiator of the Aspire network for women startup owners, I’d met a lot of very interesting women. One of them was Valérie Vuillerat, the managing director of Ginetta. She offered me a job, and I took it. At the agency I was the link between clients and developers. I worked closely with the people from the technical area, but I didn’t speak their language. Then I went back to taking courses at the university. But this was dreadfully theoretical, boring front of class teaching, and I didn’t enjoy it at all. I was sure that anybody can learn programming, but I felt it had to be done differently.

So what is your company doing better?

We do exactly what I was missing at the time. We put people without a technical background in a pleasant atmosphere and use lots of practical exercises to give them sufficient competences and self-confidence in programming. Most of them are like me – they don’t necessarily want to embark on a new career, they want to work with developers on a solid basis. That’s why at Master21 you learn the fundamental terms and concepts and understand how design, front end, back end and databases fit together. Participants learn HTML, CSS, Javascript and Ruby and try out for themselves how object-oriented programming works.

How did the start-up process work out?

I started a pilot project for Master21 while I was still working at Ginetta. The fluid transition was ideal for me. My co-founder is responsible for the technical side and content, I’m responsible the business aspect. I’m very happy that he gave me the push I needed to start. I’m not sure I would have dared to found a company on my own. A few months ago, we hired a new employee. I find it very motivating if every initiative doesn’t depend on me and I can work with a team.

What do you most appreciate about being an entrepreneur?

I can set my own schedule for the day, I’m learning a lot and I work every day with bright, exciting people. I’m also seeing that my services are directly influencing the students. There have already been two cases where people met on the course and subsequently started a project together. It’s more difficult to find developers who like teaching and are good at it.

What happens next with Master21?

I’m currently participating in the Entrepreneurs’ Organisation’s Accelerator Programme, and I’m also working with a coach. Currently I’m not at all interested in a financing round, because I’d like to continue to grow independently of investors. I want the firm to develop, but at my own pace and with long-term prospects.

The company’s headquarters are in Zurich, you live in Basel. What happens where?

I’m in Zurich when I’m working at the Impact Hub and want to meet people. The courses have also been held there so far. In Basel I work on corporate strategy in my home office and write texts. If things get too quiet for me, I go to the “Unternehmen Mitte” establishment and work there, or I meet someone for lunch at the Markthalle. I think it's because there are so many expats in Basel that there’s a great sense of openness there.

How important is your personal network for the success of Master21?

My network is absolutely central. At the start, I emailed every single one of my contacts, told them about my new project and asked for feedback. I maintain my network by LinkedIn and email, and I go and have coffee with people regularly. I also go to events like TEDxZurich, and I’m active in We Shape Tech.

You’re an enthusiastic networker.

Yes, it’s easy for me. For many people networking has such a negative image. I’m not interested in collecting business cards; I want to get to know people. And I’d much rather talk to one person than quickly give my card to a whole lot of people. I really enjoy networking, because I can learn something from everybody. A couple of years ago I was just everywhere, including to promote my business. Now I find it boring if someone’s just presenting their pitch, and I’m better at choosing where I participate. I find networking particularly valuable if you can share your ideas on a joint topic with others in small groups.

You brought the initiative for diversity, the We Shape Tech network, which was previously already active in Zurich and Bern, to Basel. Why does Basel need this network?

Basel still has a lot of potential in the technology and innovation area. One indication of that for us was the way that we were welcomed with open arms. Our board member Elaine Skapetis is a developer at Adobe. The company supported us generously without hesitation with our first two Basel events. The hall at the launch event was filled to bursting, the response was just unbelievable. We offer people working or interested in the technology and innovation field the opportunity to share ideas and views and learn from each other. We follow a specific format here, where one person tells their story, a discussion is initiated, and there’s time for networking. Our goal is to connect people, communicate knowledge and ensure access to other organisations and partners. Knowledge and a good network are power.

What are the advantages of networks primarily aimed at women?

In Basel men are welcome at We Shape Tech as well. To promote diversity, you need both men and women. However, sadly, only a few men have taken advantage of the opportunity to date. The few men at the meeting have an experience which women often have, namely being part of a minority. If you have a group of just women, the atmosphere is more relaxed. I also see this in courses specifically for women at Master21. If women are just with other women, they trust themselves to do more. They ask questions which they wouldn’t if men were present, say more and are more confident than if there were men there.

About Melanie Kovacs
Melanie Kovacs founded Master21, where people interested in courses with practical relevance are introduced to the fundamentals of programming. Previously, she has founded the women’s network Aspire, and organised start-up weekends. She studied business administration at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Business Administration and the University of Madrid and completed a CAS in requirements engineering at the University of Applied Sciences, Rappers. Together with Aileen Zumstein and Elaine Skapetis, Melanie Kovacs brought the network We Shape Tech to Basel. The Movement in Diversity initiative offers a platform and community for people who want to make a difference in the hi-tech and innovation area. The organisation focuses simultaneously on communicating knowledge and promoting the exchange of ideas.

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

Impact Hub Basel has successfully launched

13.08.2018

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

Nouveau au Jura: La fintech jurassienne eHyve

02.07.2018

report Life Sciences

“I enjoy thinking about seemingly unsolvable problems”

13.03.2018

Andreas Plückthun continues his research where others stop: 40 employees work in his laboratory on protein engineering. Their results form the basis for three biotech companies: Morphosys in Munich, as well as Molecular Partners and G7 Therapeutics (today Heptares Zurich) in Schlieren. At the Antibody Congress 2017 in Basel, Andreas Plückthun told us why he remains true to his research.

Mr. Plückthun, you co-founded three biotech companies in three decades. How did this come about?

There was always this curiosity in the beginning to discover something – but never the wish to found a company. After we produced artificial antibodies and learned how to mimic the immune system, we established the company Morphosys. Then the next question arose: can we do this with other protein molecules and solve new problems? Out of this emerged Designed Ankyrin Repeated Proteins (DARPins) and a second company, Molecular Partners in Schlieren. The next challenge was then to stabilize receptors by means of protein engineering in order to develop better drugs for these points of attack. Based on this research, we founded the third company, G7 Therapeutics.

Who pushed ahead with the spin-offs each time?

For the first company, it was my research colleagues. I was the more sceptical of us three at the time. The other two companies were traditional spin-offs of my doctoral and postdoctoral students.

How are the companies doing today?

Morphosys now has 430 employees and recently celebrated its 25th anniversary. We also received the first FDA approval for an antibody that is now available on the market. This is one of the few companies that is still doing exactly what we once wrote in the business plan, and successfully too. Molecular Partners has 130 employees, several Phase 2 and 3 studies, and, like Morphosys, is listed on the stock exchange. G7 Therapeutics was sold to the British company Heptares, which in turn belongs to the Japanese company Sosei. In short: all companies are doing well. I don’t consider founding a company to be a particular achievement. The achievement is more that the companies are flourishing and bringing drugs to the market.

What changes have you noticed over the decades when it comes to founding a company?

The climate has changed completely. It was totally against the grain in Europe 25 years ago to found a biotech company. That’s why people went to California. At a symposium in America, I was once introduced as a researcher and a founder with the words; “He’s like us.” It was very common there for a long time to be both a researcher and an entrepreneur. That scepticism has since disappeared here, and founding a company is now judged positively. A venture capital scene has also developed since then. To be fair, I have to say that it helps investors if you’ve already successfully founded a company. The first deal is always the hardest.

You seem to be quite successful when it comes to founding companies. Did it ever tempt you to move to one of your companies?

It was never a question for me to leave the university. It’s an incredible privilege to be paid by the state to do crazy things. I always wanted to think about the next challenge at the university. Not having to account for quarterly profits is the only way forward in this context. In a company that conducts research with money from investors, you simply cannot undertake the type of risky and long-term projects that interest me. But I can say that thanks to the companies that are based on my research, I have repaid my dividends and created many jobs.

So you’ll continue to devote yourself to basic research. Can this be steered towards commercialization at all?

We’ve always wanted to solve a problem that seemed important enough to us. At some point in the research the question arises of how to use the results, what you can make of them. If we hadn’t commercialized the results, the problems would have simply stopped at an interesting point. We would have stopped halfway along. This is comparable to a coming up with blueprint for a computer and then not building it. By founding the companies, we could ensure that the projects would continue.

Is there any collaboration with industry within the scope of your research?

Direct collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and our laboratory has never worked properly. Expectations and time horizons are very different. We develop new ideas and concepts that are often not exactly in keeping with large-scale pharmaceutical research. I don’t think anyone will feel offended when I say that the pharmaceutical industry is very conservative. We do have many contacts but hardly any collaboration. That being said, our spin-offs work very well with the pharmaceutical industry.

Which topics would you like to focus on next?

We are researching artificial viruses that cannot reproduce. The viruses should produce proteins directly in the body that are needed as therapeutic agents. This is so far away from practical implementation that such a project is only possible at a university. But I am absolutely convinced that it would have enormous significance if it worked. I couldn’t sit still if we didn’t at least try. We are once again trying to solve a problem in my laboratory that most people in the field would consider impossible to solve. That’s what makes me get up in the morning. I want to show how it works.

Learn more about Andreas Plückthun between basic research and biotech entrepreneurship at our event on 24 April 2018.

About
Andreas Plückthun (*1956) is a scientist whose research is focused on the field of protein engineering. He is the director of the department of biochemistry at the University of Zurich. Andreas Plückthun was appointed to the faculty of the University of Zurich as a Full Professor of biochemistry in 1993. Plückthun was group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry , Germany (1985-1993). He was elected to the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) in 1992, and named a member of the German National Academy of Science (Leopoldina) in 2003. He is cofounder of the biotechnology companies Morphosys (Martinsried, Germany), Molecular Partners AG (Zürich-Schlieren, Switzerland) and G7 Therapeutics (Zürich-Schlieren, Switzerland).

Interview: Annett Altvater and Stephan Emmerth, BaselArea.swiss

report Micro, Nano & Materials

Basel startup QNAMI wins seed capital

14.06.2018

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

MIT Challenge Europe

26.04.2018

report

Meet the BaseLaunch Startups

11.03.2018

Six of the BaseLaunch startups recently started Phase II. They received either grants up to 250,000 Swiss francs or gained free of charge access to BaseLaunch laboratory and office space at the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area. Hear what the startups, the BaseLaunch team and selection committee members experienced in the first year. Find out more about what makes BaseLaunch unique.

The BaseLaunch accelerator is now open for applications for the second cycle. Entrepreneurs with a healthcare based project or a game-changing innovation in diagnostics, medtech or related field at the pre-seed or seed funding stage are invited to submit their applications to the program.

Following the application deadline on 14 May, promising projects will be admitted to the accelerator program for a period of 15 months. In phase I, the startups will benefit from the support of industry experts, office- and laboratory space free of charge and access to healthcare partners. After three months, they will be invited to present their idea to the selection committee. They will determine which promising startups will proceed to Phase II that runs for one year.

BaseLaunch is backed by five industry leaders — Johnson & Johnson Innovation, Novartis Venture Fund, Pfizer, Roche and Roivant Sciences. Other public and private partners such as KPMG and Vossius & Partner also support the initiative.

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

Innosuisse Roadshow in Basel – new team, fundings and open questions

29.03.2018

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

Non-dilutive fundings – great offers of Innosuisse and European Programs

29.03.2018

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

“As an entrepreneur, you have to own up to your decisions”

06.02.2018

Five years ago, Alisée de Tonnac quit her job at L’Oréal and travelled the world to set up the first edition of the startup competition Seedstars World. Five years later, Seedstars is present in more than 85 cities worldwide, runs its own co-working and educational centers and plans to have 15 Seedspaces for co-working and co-living by the end of 2018. BaselArea.swiss sat down with Alisée de Tonnac after her keynote at the Swiss Innovation Forum that took place in Basel last November.

BaselArea.swiss: What was the most compelling argument for you to leave your career at an international corporation and become an entrepreneur?

Alisée de Tonnac: I remember coming across this quote from Eleanor Roosevelt: “Do one thing every day that scares you.” I thought: Gosh, I do the opposite. I was complacent (I wonder if that is not the definition of unhappy), my corporate and personal life at that time was not engaging me in the right fashion, or at least I did not know how to engage with it in the right fashion. I did not foresee that entrepreneurship and building something of my own was the necessary change, but it definitely became part of who I am today.

What does entrepreneurship mean to you?

First of all, I think there are different types of entrepreneurs. One builds everything from scratch and does not sleep until his idea transforms into reality. Others, like myself, follow; they support and scale the idea. So, potentially, entrepreneurship is for everyone, depending on your personality traits and of course you would need to be comfortable with uncertainty, taking risks, and self-management. I love about my lifestyle that I decide how my day roles out. It is spectacular. To be honest, one of the main ingredients to my professional and personal success is that I work with an unbelievable team. My co-founders make the difference. I do not know if I would have been able to launch a company on my own. The team is crucial – keep in mind that you spend every day with them.

What do you think is important in a team of co-founders?

My co-founders and I are very complementary. I am an operational person, definitely not a strategist. A strategist looks five years ahead, sees all the obstacles and still heads forward. More importantly though, we made sure that our values are aligned. We asked ourselves whether we would stick together during the highs and lows. Shared values have proven to be our biggest strength and one of the reasons why we are still sustaining, five years later. We want to build good things with good people. We believe that we can build a profitable business and be good, but more importantly we have an underlying foundation of values that keeps us together no matter what – at least until now...

Before you co-founded Seedstars, you worked with L’Oreal. How do you benefit from your corporate experience?

I learned so much in terms of business, culture, teamwork and social pressure. I also know what I do not want to do, which is just as important. It also taught me a lot on how I would want to build the culture within our new structure. The culture is so fundamental in managing and scaling the business. I think you learn while working at corporations what differentiates them and how a uniquely defined and communicated culture makes the difference.

What was the biggest surprise for you when becoming an entrepreneur?

The ownership of your day and actions. Because you really have to own up to your decisions. You cannot bullshit and you cannot hide behind the brand or the cc- emails. It was a bit terrifying initially to be the only person that can start the whole machine – and very gratifying at the same time.

You work with entrepreneurs in more than 60 countries. Which challenges are these entrepreneurs tackling?

In healthcare, we see many digital platforms, like one that allows you to recognize if a medicine is fake or not – which is an issue in Nigeria and other emerging markets. There are telemedicine platforms to connect rural areas with specialists and educational apps for pregnant women, as childbirth is still a huge cause of death in those regions.

Seedstars launched its own trainings. Why was that necessary?

There is talent everywhere, but not every talented person gets the same access to education, network opportunities and infrastructure. With our training, we tap talent that is not yet exposed to such opportunities.

What did you learn from your experience in Lagos?

We are in markets that represent a big part of the world. Exposing yourself to different consumer habits, radical transformations and growing cities helps to understand the world of tomorrow. We are living in a global economy today, the world does not end at the borders of a nation. People who ignore that fact are limiting themselves professionally and personally. Take Lagos, for example: there are 20 million people, the streets are buzzing, everyone is young and you witness a dynamic “everything is possible”- spirit. It is so contrary to coming back to Geneva where we have meters of space between one person and the next. After two weeks, I am complaining when the bus is five minutes late. We are very comfortable and very fortunate – which can also be seen as a problem for innovation. Being comfortable can be a goal, but it is in many ways the opposite of being innovative.

Your company is registered in Geneva. How important is the Swiss headquarters?

First of all, we are very proud of the “Swiss made” brand, which has supported us in successfully scaling the business around the world. The values that the flag carries – like quality, professionalism and neutrality – we aim to represent on the ground. As all partners grew up in Switzerland, we also keep close ties with our private and public network. Switzerland is an amazing hub with strong public institutions like the UN in Geneva or the WEF in Davos that play an important role in the markets where we are present with Seedstars. Many multinational companies residing here are also very interested in these emerging markets, not least in terms of talent acquisition. Moreover, they provide potential solutions. It is crucial to be present in Switzerland as well as in the countries where we have our competitions. Interestingly, we slowly start to see reverse innovation: Safaricom, the biggest mobile service provider in Kenya launched the payment solution M-Pesa. They are now testing their solution in Romania and Albania. I am certain that the usual way of doing business by conducting a product in the north and selling it in the south will blur out eventually.


About Alisée de Tonnac
Alisée graduated from HEC Lausanne and obtained her Masters in International Management at Bocconi University. The French citizen lived in Singapore, Silicon Valley, Switzerland, Italy and in Lagos, Nigeria. She was a product manager for luxury brands at L’Oreal Group and worked at Voyage Privé, a leading European startup. After traveling around the world for a year to set up the first edition of the Seedstars World startup competition back in 2013, Alisée is now managing the company. She has accumulated deep knowledge of trends in technology, social media & consumer behavior in emerging markets. Alisée is a board member of the School of Management of Fribourg and a member of the Swiss National Innovation Council. She was nominated Social Entrepreneur Forbes 30 under 30 in 2017 and was Innovation Fellow of Wired UK in 2015.

About Seedstars
Seedstars is a Switzerland based group with the mission to impact people’s lives in emerging markets through technology and entrepreneurship. Seedstars connects stakeholders, builds companies from scratch with public and private partners, and invests in high growth startups within these ecosystems. Through different activities that range from startup scouting to company building and acceleration programs, the team has built the most powerful network of entrepreneurs, investors, incubators, corporations and government officials from more than 65 fast growing economies around the globe. Seedstars started running its operations in 2013, launching its startup competition model on 20 emerging markets. By 2018, the competition is present in more than 85 cities, and the Seedstars Group will be launching 15 strategic hubs (Seedspaces, co-working activities, acceleration programs and academy centres) around the world. The business model relies on recurring partnership deals with both local and international players seeking to be involved in impact investment in the fields of technology and innovation. Part of the revenue channels also includes a hybrid company building model through which Seedstars launches new companies in new markets, with tested business models adapted to the local environment. So far, Seedstars has invested in 15 startups. Another 10 to 15 investments are foreseen for the first semester of 2018.

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

New Venture Assessment turns young entrepreneurs into experts

13.03.2018

report Innovation

La deuxième édition de l’Innovation Lounge s’est penché sur l’industrie 4.0

12.03.2018

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

"We're giving Basel Impact Hub fever"

09.01.2018

Impact Hubs are a real success story. Founded in 2005 in London, there are now over 100 Impact Hubs around the world with more than 15,000 members. Following the lead from Bern, Zurich, Geneva and Lausanne, Basel will be the next Impact Hub in Switzerland. The force behind the movement is Hubbasel, an association founded by entrepreneur André Moeri, sustainability expert Connie Low and lawyer Hanna Byland. We wanted to know why an Impact Hub is more than just a coworking space and how entrepreneurs as well as investors and companies benefit from them, so we talked with Hanna Byland to shed some light for us.

Ms Byland, you have been volunteering at Hubbasel since early 2017. How did that come about?

Hanna Byland: I was invited to the opening of the Impact Hub in Bern and was excited by the concept. So I asked around a bit about whether efforts were being made in Basel to create one and that is how I came into contact with Connie Low and André Moeri. We share the same values, from respectful collaboration and a positive vision of the future to a readiness to get actively involved in the cause. At the same time, each of us brings a different skill set to the table. Connie is well established in the sustainability arena and is a constantly positive driving force. André looks after the company components and has a knack for seeing the potential in people and ideas. I'm the more practical one, keeping an eye on all of the legal and feasibility aspects – it's an ideal combination. We founded Hubbasel at the start of 2017 and at this point there are eight of us in total. All of us have worked tirelessly on making the plans a reality and already everyone's contributions have gotten us a nomination in the global network for the status of "Impact Hub Candidate".

When will the Basel Impact Hub open?

We would like to open in the second half of 2018. At the moment we are set up at Andreas Erbe's Launchlab. It's an ideal location. Really inspiring. But we're still looking for our own space with 1,000 to 2,000 square metres. The space should be laid out so that companies can flexibly grow or shrink depending on the circumstances.

How is an Impact Hub different from a coworking space?

An Impact Hub always consists of three components: Inspire - Connect - Enable. Companies, investors and creative people come together in an Impact Hub to find inspiration and support for their plans. We don't just want to create a workspace, but a networking space. Every Impact Hub is connected to a location, but it also offers the opportunity to access other Impact Hubs all over the world to find like-minded people and in that way generate local ideas with global impact. The people who find each other here want to make the world just that little bit better through their work, their company or their innovations. They are lofty goals, but we have to start somewhere, right?

There are already Impact Hubs in Zurich, Bern, Geneva and Lausanne. Why does Basel need another one?

Geneva is focused on exchange with international organisations. Bern is government-oriented. Zurich is closer to the business world. I'm of the opinion that Basel is a perfect breeding ground for an Impact Hub. We've got a good number of multinational corporations and at the same time the population here has a heightened sense of responsibility. That combination is unique.

How does this sense of responsibility manifest itself in Basel?

In loads of smaller initiatives and in the activities of its many foundations, but also in locations like the Markthalle or the Gundeldingerfeld area. Basel places a lot of value on the sustainable development of the city and its spaces. Food production, nutrition and food waste as well as social justice in terms of equality of opportunity in education and treatment are all important topics for the Basel community. There are a lot of players and projects that are pushing in the same direction. Still, many of these initiatives are single projects. We believe that we can bundle these forces more effectively, even on a global level, through the Impact Hub network.

Who is the Basel Impact Hub for?

We want to get companies in here that are interested in sustainability, give them a place they can call home, and show them that they aren't alone. For companies, the Impact Hub is also a source of new talent. And for investors there is no comparable platform. You have to figure that for investors it's hard work to find good companies in which they want to invest. We can help them with that. Universities are also interested in a place of collaboration. They have the knowledge and the educated people, and then through us they can access real-life applications.

What has the feedback been so far?

It has been very positive. Our communications channels including newsletters, meet-ups and Facebook are all very actively used. Once a month we organise events to find out how our community is developing. There are typically between 40 and 60 people at the events. The exchange is lively and the feedback is really inspiring. In future we would like to offer even more, from workshops, event series and hack-a-thons to accelerators, incubators and fellowships. With the last three ideas, it is really important to us to work with local players. We were able to get the Christoph Merian Foundation, the Gebert Rüf Foundation and the Fondation Botnar to provide us with some initial support. We were incredibly excited about that, of course.

So what is the focus of your events?

We always have entrepreneurs as guests who we then put together with investors and coaches. Typically, we select a certain topic or area that is particularly difficult and focus on that. We find that many of them enjoy offering and applying their skills and support. At this point, we just need a place where we can host those kinds of exchanges and where these ideas can become projects and business ideas. The next public event where we will be working with students from the University of Applied Sciences of North West Switzerland (FHNW) will take place on 13 February 2017.

About Hanna Byland
Hanna Byland is a legal assistant at the law and notary offices of Neidhardt/Vollenweider/Jost/Stoll/Gysin/Tschopp in Basel. She studied law at the Universities of Lucerne and Neuchâtel. Hanna Byland was a member of the Young Liberals in Aargau and has been a volunteer at Hubbasel since the start of 2017.

Interview: Annett Altvater

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

Call for the Swissbiolabs Challenge at the 2nd Swiss Diagnostics Start-Up Day in Olten

01.03.2018

report Supporting Entrepreneurs

Hacks for a healthy diet and against food waste

26.02.2018

report Innovation

“We want to improve the visibility of startups at the University of Basel”

06.11.2017

Christian Elias Schneider has been Head of Innovation at the University of Basel for eight months now. His job is to promote entrepreneurship and projects in collaboration with industry.

Mr. Schneider, you took on a newly created post at the University of Basel. The idea is to give innovation a face at the university. What specifically does that mean in terms of your work?

We picked two focal areas: first, attention should be drawn to the topic of entrepreneurship at the university. Researchers with good ideas should have incentives to monetize these ideas. And those who are already working towards this goal should receive more support. The second focal area is on collaboration with the business world. The objective here is to realize more projects together with industry partners.

How do you go about this task?

In the many conversations I’ve had with startups at the university in recent months, it has become clear that there are hardly any connections within this scene; many of the entrepreneurs have never met each other. Of course, many young entrepreneurs struggle with the same problems, so we brought them together and founded the Entrepreneurs Club to give them a platform for sharing and discussion. We want the entrepreneurs to see themselves as a team – a group that is recognized and valued by the university and by society. We can offer them access to people who would be difficult to approach individually.

What can you offer the entrepreneurs? What have they been waiting for, and what have they been lacking?

First, the startups at the university were lacking visibility. People didn’t know who they were, and they were often completely on their own. We believe our role is to offer them visibility – both within the university and externally – and help them build relationships with industry partners, the financial sector and other service providers. There are also plans to offer startups expert coaching and mentoring at an early stage.

For a few months you have been offering courses that teach University of Basel students and staff important startup skills, such as preparing business plans, handling IP rights and much more. How have these new resources been received?

Demand is huge. We have been practically overrun and overwhelmed by the success. As a result, we are considering to expand the service, with the goal of talking to students about these important issues at an early stage. The earlier that entrepreneurs deal with these issues, the fewer mistakes they will make later. For example, it’s important that we make researchers aware of IP issues very early in the game. Otherwise, they run the risk of revealing important knowledge too soon and then being unable to protect it. These courses offer help at an early stage, and this support can then be smoothly incorporated into coaching.

For the last eight months, you have been Head of Innovation at the University of Basel. What responses have you seen so far?

Everyone I’ve talked to in recent months has given very positive – in fact, enthusiastic – feedback about our innovation initiative and other resources. Clearly, it was time that the University of Basel actively tackled this issue and filled a gap.

On November 10, the University of Basel will be holding its first Innovation Day in Allschwil. What can we expect?

At the Innovation Day, we will demonstrate what is important to us: bringing people together, debating innovation, developing new ideas – and doing this in a stimulating and open atmosphere. More than 200 people have signed up, the waiting list is long and we’re happy that this new event has been so well received right from the start.

What would you like to achieve over the next two years?

Startups should feel at home at the University of Basel. The individuals should connect with each other, and an active, dynamic scene should emerge that will also interest startups in the region as a whole. In the long term, we may certainly evolve into a hub with an international appeal that will attract founders and young entrepreneurs. We want to help Basel become a preferred place for many startups to realize their visionary ideas. We will be able to do this only if we work closely with all partners: with the local universities, with institutions such as BaselArea.swiss – and, most importantly, with industry partners. In discussion with business, it is clear that the doors are open.

Interview: Matthias Geering, Head of Communications & Marketing at University of Basel

report Innovation

Innovation Lounge, un événement unique au Jura

05.02.2018

report ICT

Unsere Menüempfehlung: Die Food Hackdays

05.02.2018

report BaselArea.swiss

"I want to turn innovative research into new drugs"

04.07.2017

Each year some 250,000 patients develop a type of cancer because of faulty communication between cells. This malfunction occurs in what is known as the NOTCH signal path. There are currently no effective treatments – but this is set to change. Cellestia Biotech AG is developing an innovative drug against this type of cancer by using a novel active ingredient that selectively attacks the malfunctioning cell communication. The drug could be used to treat leukaemia, lymphomas and solid tumours such as breast cancer.

In 2014 Professor Freddy Radtke and Dr Rajwinder Lehal, who had dealt with this subject in his dissertation, founded the company Cellestia Biotech AG. In 2015, an experienced team of pharmacology and oncology development specialists led by Michael Bauer came on board, investing in Cellestia as co-founders. Bauer and his team had previously spent several years examining various projects in an effort to help shape the development of such a start-up company. We spoke with him about the risks and implications of founding a company.

Interview: Stephan Emmerth

Mr Bauer, how long did you have to look before you found a project you wanted to invest?

Michael Bauer: Over the course of many years and alongside my regular jobs, I and my colleagues examined, evaluated and rejected a number of projects – sometimes more intensively, sometimes less. Some of the projects were great, some being unbelievably innovative. However, something always led us not to pursue a project in the end.

The search did not just cost you a lot of time, but also a lot of money as you have to conduct due diligence every time.

We of course had to put effort into the search. You could say that we identified, examined and evaluated projects acting similar to a small venture fund. Thanks to the make-up of our team, we were able to undertake many of the tasks ourselves, at times bringing in experts. There were many instances when specialists from our network assisted us. There was a considerable amount of good will. To some extent we footed the bill ourselves.

Why did this not work out before Cellestia?

A number of conditions have to be met. The basis is of course excellent, innovative research results protected by patents. Also important are ownership rights to the inventions and reasonable licencing terms. Finally, there has to be agreement on the expectations of the people involved in the project. We have experienced pretty much everything. Many times it emerged over the course of the investigation that, for example, the research data was not quite so convincing as had initially been presented. Or the expectations with respect to the licencing conditions were too far apart. In one project, they wanted to sell us patents that had expired. It often happens that the scientists have unrealistic ideas about the value of their project. One retired professor who had tried in vain for many years to finance his company expected us to try for five per cent of the shares. This is of course not the basis for a partnership.

Juggling research and entrepreneurship is a big challenge, isn’t it?

It is necessary to develop an understanding of the relations and contributions of the various partners involved in such a project, each of who have very different personal risks. On the one hand, there is some 20 years of basic research behind Cellestia, 11 of which were at the EPFL. Rajwinder Lehal has been working concretely on this project for the past nine years, initially as part of his dissertation, then as a post-doc and since 2014 as Chief Scientific Officer. We respect this history from the management team and are happy to have access to the resulting knowledge. At the same time, the inventor’s side has to have regard for the entire expenditure: some five million of public funds were invested over the years at the EPFL. However, it could take hundreds of millions until a product comes onto the market. Moreover, the path from the first successful experiment in lab animals until a drug is approved for human use is long. Altogether, the cost of research could be marginal in comparison to the development and marketing, amounting to only a few per cent. And the development costs are paid for by the investors, who need the investment to pay off. All of these factors have to be considered and respected in a partnership. This worked with our team.

You have many years of industrial experience. What attracted you to the entrepreneurship?

The challenge of turning ground breaking inventions into products attracted me. I consider myself a product developer and had wanted to start a company even as a student. Looking back, I have to say that I am lucky to have gained nearly 20 years of professional experience in product development as it is important to be able to understand and appreciate just how complex the challenges are in product development in life sciences and pharma. This wealth of experience also helps you understand where your own knowledge ends and when experts have to be brought on board to be able to successfully advance a project or a company.

What was the incubation from first contact until you joined as co-founder at Cellestia like?

The current Chief Scientific Officer, Rajwinder Lehal, and I had been in regular contact with each other for a number of years. At that time, however, the project was not advanced enough to establish a company. Initially, Professor Radtke, Rajwinder Lehal and Maximilien Murone founded Cellestia in 2014. We met a few times in summer 2015 with the Lausanne research and founder team at i-net, the predecessor of BaselArea.swiss. Things moved quickly from there. In just a few meetings, we were able to evaluate the project and develop a good personal understanding, which for me and my partners was very important if we were to invest in Cellestia. We could agree on matters quickly, more or less by handshake. Then came the necessary contracts and in November we were already listed in the commercial register. Our lawyer and co-founder Ralf Rosenow saw to the formalities. We decided to move the headquarters from Lausanne to Basel but to leave the research activities in Lausanne, resulting in a sort of transcantonal partnership.

Why move the headquarters to Basel?

For us, the most important argument in favour of Basel was access to talent and resources for product development, resulting from the proximity to leading pharmaceutical companies such as Novartis, Roche, Actelion and many others. Such access to experienced development specialists is more difficult in Lausanne. In addition, our co-founder Roger Meier and other colleagues already have an active investor network in Basel with an affinity to the sector and Basel itself. We did not have such access in Zurich or Geneva at the beginning. I personally also like the quality of work and life in Basel. The city is of a manageable size yet international, with diverse cultural offerings. Furthermore, the Basel airport has excellent connections – you are in the middle of Europe and in just one to two hours you’re practically anywhere Europe, be it London, Berlin or Barcelona. Lausanne, on the other hand, has in its favour the outstanding academic environment with the EPFL and the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research. Here, too, there is an excellent environment for start-ups, but in our opinion more toward engineering and technical disciplines or medicine technology. Many companies are founded each year at the EPFL and the innovation potential is enormous, but Cellestia is the first company founded at the EPFL that seeks to bring a drug to clinical development. We are happy to be able to combine the positive elements of both regions via what is now an established approach with two locations.

Which pre-conditions were decisive enough that you ended up collaborating and founding the company?

Actually, everything was right from the very beginning. First of all, the personal atmosphere between the people involved has to be right. This was also the basis in coming to a fair agreement for all co-founders with respect to understanding the evaluation and allocating the respective shares in the company at the time it was founded. On the other hand, it was of course crucial that the substantive examination of the project – as concerns both the scientific basis and the quality of the data – and the examination of the patent as well as license conditions of the EPFL were positive. Also important to us was that the risk profile is manageable, i.e. there is a good balance between innovation and reference to the research already carried out.

How will Cellestia develop further operationally?

Cellestia already has a long history, starting with the research activities at the EPFL. When the management team was expanded in 2015, other co-founders joined at the same time that I did: Dirk Weber as Chief Medical Officer, as well as the already mentioned co-founders Ralf Rosenow and Roger Meier. Cellestia now has six employees. Then there are the numerous service and consulting mandates, which complement our internal resources as needed. If you take into consideration external services, I reckon there are now well over 100 people involved in Cellestia. We expect that we will continue to grow in the direction of clinical development as our first project progresses and further expand the team. Moreover, we would like to develop additional products in our pipeline as soon as possible. This will definitely require additional financial resources. The Board of Directors will also develop further, expanding and adapting with each financing round in order to properly represent new investors. Research work is increasingly being carried out by external services providers, and at the same time continuing in the laboratory of Professor Freddy Radtke at the EPFL. We are currently setting up new framework agreements with the EPFL concerning the further use of their infrastructure. The flexibility there is very helpful for us.

What are the next milestones?

A key milestone is the treatment of the first cancer patients. We hope to be able to treat the first patients in October.

How are the clinical studies organised?

The course of a clinical trial for new drugs is strictly regulated. In the Phase I study, the compatibility of the active ingredient is first examined. This is when we treat patients who are suffering from a form of cancer in which NOTCH most likely plays a role. In the following Phase II study, the efficacy of our drug is researched in different types of cancer. This is when we select patients in whom activation of the NOTCH signal path is detected with a Cellestia diagnostic method. The therapeutic benefit for these patients is therefore very likely.

Have there been any surprises so far?

No, not really, because we have considered everything. Or yes, but pleasant surprises: due to the considerable amount of preparatory work, we were already quite certain with respect to the effect mechanism. It has now finally been possible to detect the precise binding mechanism of the drug, which confirmed all former studies. This is also the basis for significantly expanding the programme. We can now build a new platform on whose basis we can generate new drugs for new indications. In addition, it was not that easy to manufacture the drug in large quantities and in a high quality. Innovative steps were needed, which ultimately leads to a patent.

What do you have in mind for the next five years?

We are very optimistic about Cellestia’s prospects for success and are planning the next couple of years in detail. We of course also have a plan for the overall development over the next five years, but as experience shows, such plans always change with the results obtained. This is also the fascination and challenge in medication development – it does not allow you to plan everything in detail, and you have to respond flexibly to new results. This also applies to possible setbacks, of course. It is important to have sufficient reserves to deal with these and resolve them. Thanks to the successful financing rounds that we could close in January 2017, we are in a position to begin with Phase I while at the same time pursue further financing.

Who has invested in Cellestia so far?

The first investors after the deposit of the initial capital were predominantly many of our advisors, i.e. experts who are familiar with the sector as well as private people involved in life sciences and the pharma sector as investors. Around one-third of the shareholders are experts from the pharma and life sciences setting. Over the course of the Series A, B and C financing rounds, larger investments from family offices also came. The first institutional investor, the PPF Group, invested after its own, extensive due diligence that was conducted by experts from Sotio. So far, we’ve been able to mobilise a total of CHF 8 million to drive product development at Cellestia. In preparation of the next financing round, we are in talks with private investors, venture funds and pharmaceutical companies. We are confident that we will be able to win good partners for Cellestia’s next phase. The right combination of partnerships and financing is important. We need strong partners on board to give patients access to our medications quickly.


About
Michael Bauer (born 1966) has been CEO at Cellestia since November 2015. He studied chemistry at the University of Hamburg and completed his doctoral in biotechology from 1994 to 1997 at the Hamburg-Harburg University of Technology. After working in metabolic research at Zeneca in England, he moved to Syngenta in Basel in 2001 where he worked as Global Regulatory Affairs Manager in project and portfolio management. From 2007 to 2009 he was a project leader at Arpida, a biotech firm in the field of antibiotics development. From 2009 to 2012 he was a Global Program Manager at Novartis where he led global development projects in the field of oncology and brought a range of products to clinical development. From 2012 to 2015 he was the Head of Clinical Development at Polyphor.

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Record level of VC investment in Switzerland

01.02.2018

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BaseLaunch up to a solid Phase II start

30.01.2018

report BaselArea.swiss

BaseLaunch can take full advantage of the potential of Basel's life sciences ecosystem

15.03.2017

The new accelerator for healthcare ventures, BaseLaunch, wants to link the best start-ups to the Basel region – and in doing so, provide impulses for major players. The project will consistently focus on quality and the concentrated know-how in the region, says Managing Director Alethia de Léon.

Financial support through BaseLaunch can be as high as CHF 10’000 per project. Startups accepted for the second phase will receive grants up to CHF 250’000. Other regions have tens of millions at their disposal. Are you even competitive?

Highly generous programmes in the EU and around the world have shown that it is not enough to distribute a lot of money with open hands. Rather, we have to make sure that the investments go to the most promising projects, namely those with a suitable team likely to effect a successful development from an idea to the market. In short: quality – and not quantity – has topmost priority for BaseLaunch.

What makes BaseLaunch unique?

BaseLaunch focuses on the entrepreneurs. Startups accepted for the programme will receive non-repayable funding, instead of equity financing that has to be repaid. Additionally, Basel is a life sciences ecosystem with one of the highest densities of biopharmaceutical enterprises globally and has an incredible pool of talents and specialists. Our healthcare partners, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson Innovation, and Novartis Venture Fund offer direct access to valuable industry knowledge and experience relevant to develop and boost transformative healthcare solutions. Together, this allows us to give market-relevant advice suited to the needs of every single start-up company.

What types of projects is BaseLaunch especially suitable for?

BaseLaunch is open to all projects in the healthcare field. Geographically, our focus is on Switzerland and Europe. Our laboratories in Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area specialise on therapeutics, but innovative concepts in the diagnostic and medtech fields are also welcome to participate in the accelerator.

Operationally, the accelerator is managed by BaselArea.swiss but operates under a different name. Why such a setup?

BaseLaunch seeks to find the most innovative and promising healthcare start-ups, support them and embed them into the local healthcare ecosystem. This makes BaseLaunch an important part of the core activity of BaselArea.swiss. Due to the different financing and decision-making structures and in line with a focussed market presence and a particular target groups, it made sense to launch the project under a different name.

Is it then the role of the state to invest in start-ups?

No public funds are invested in the projects. The cantons are financing the operational running of BaseLaunch. But what goes directly into the start-ups comes from the private sector. With BaseLaunch, BaselArea.swiss is thus providing the right framework conditions as a neutral partner of industry fostering the emergence of new companies with suitable programmes. And don’t forget that other places are very much on the offensive with public resources. It’s important not to fall behind. We have to remain in the fiercely competitive bid to be an attractive location – without, however, distorting our liberal economic order.

Why do we need more start-ups?

Start-ups are needed first and foremost to create added value from knowledge. If we invest billions into academic research, this also needs corresponding structures to make innovations out of inventions. It’s been shown that start-ups are taking on a more and more decisive role in this respect. In addition, start-ups have the potential to grow rapidly when successful and create a great number of high-quality jobs. Actelion, which began as a start-up, is the best example of this. While BaseLaunch succeeds in working with the best start-up projects, this also generates impulses for established companies and the ecosystem as a whole. BaseLaunch thus contributes toward raising the region’s attractiveness as Europe’s leading life sciences hub.

Is the Basel region even interesting for start-ups? Isn’t the cost of living likely to frighten away entrepreneurs?

Silicon Valley, London or Boston is not more affordable. The unique advantage of Basel’s life sciences ecosystem – its concentration of talent, pharmaceutical decision-makers and capital, which are unrivalled in Europe – ultimately tip the balance in our favour in the eyes of company founders. We have seen that the Basel region scores well in these critical areas – which are “must haves” especially for young companies – that, all things considered, the overall package is more than enough. This can be seen in the steady increase in companies being founded from outside the region in recent years.

For more information about the project, please visit www.baselaunch.ch

 

About Alethia de Léon

Born in Mexico, Alethia de Léon studied at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Business School. After working in healthcare investment and product development, she was Global Head of Search and Evaluation, Business Development and Licensing for the Neuroscience Business at Novartis until 2015. In addition to managing BaseLaunch, Alethia de Léon is CEO and founder of the start-up Senes Science GmbH.

 

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Blockchain sector comes to Basel

24.01.2018

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Roivant Sciences to join BaseLaunch Accelerator as Healthcare Partner

18.01.2018

report BaselArea.swiss

Startup accelerator BaseLaunch aims to attract promising healthcare ventures to Basel, Eur...

22.02.2017

BaseLaunch, Switzerland’s new accelerator for healthcare startups, provides handpicked ventures with access to the Basel region’s life sciences ecosystem. BaseLaunch has been initiated and is operated by BaselArea.swiss, supported by Novartis Venture Fund, Johnson & Johnson Innovation, Pfizer, and partners with digitalswitzerland’s Kickstart Accelerator.

BaselArea.swiss, the office for promoting innovation and inward investment for the northwest cantons of Basel-Stadt, Basel-Landschaft and Jura, today announced the launch of Switzerland’s new healthcare startup accelerator BaseLaunch. Harnessing the Basel region’s unique position as a global life sciences hub, as well as its rising popularity among investors and a program tailored to healthcare entrepreneurs, BaseLaunch is looking to attract the next generation of breakthrough companies.

“A healthy and well-endorsed startup scene is necessary to bolster and further expand the elite position of Switzerland’s exceptional life sciences economy,” stated Domenico Scala, President of BaselArea.swiss. “Switzerland has much catching-up to do in this regard and BaseLaunch is a strategic initiative to fill this gap.” “The expertise of BaselArea.swiss in connecting innovators and supporting entrepreneurs enables BaseLaunch to be extremely focused on the unmet needs of healthcare startups while at the same time contributing to the excellent Swiss innovation landscape, particularly in the life sciences arena,” added Dr. Christof Klöpper, CEO of BaselArea.swiss. As the designated healthcare vertical of digitalswitzerland’s Kickstart Accelerator and a partner of established public and private bodies, BaseLaunch is closely aligned with key national and regional initiatives. BaseLaunch has already garnered support from global biopharmaceutical companies and innovation champions Novartis Venture Fund, Johnson & Johnson Innovation and Pfizer. These healthcare partners are engaging with BaseLaunch to find and support transformational innovations that solve unmet medical needs. “BaseLaunch aims to support the best healthcare innovators and offers them fast access to founder-friendly venture grants, insights, industry access and state-of-the-art infrastructure. We want to enable and individually guide them to become fully embedded into the life sciences value chain,” explained Alethia de Léon, Managing Director of BaseLaunch.

The program consists of two phases, which extend over a total of 15 months. During the first phase, lasting three months, entrepreneurs work closely with the BaseLaunch Team as well as a network of entrepreneurs-in-residence, advisors and consultants to further develop their business cases. Financial support through BaseLaunch can be as high as CHF 10,000 per project. Up to three startups accepted for the second phase will receive the opportunity to secure a one-year grant of up to CHF 250,000 to generate data and reach business plan milestones in the labs at the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area.

BaseLaunch accepts applications for the inaugural acceleration program cycle until June 30, 2017. Additional program cycles will start in late 2018 and 2019. A Selection Committee of industry experts will handpick the ventures invited for each program cycle.

 

Comments from BaseLaunch healthcare partners

Richard Mason, Head of the Johnson & Johnson London Innovation Centre:
“This program offers grants and lab space to selected startups - with no strings attached - illustrating that what we want to create here is an optimal environment for startups that focuses on supporting transformative science and great ideas in Switzerland.”

Dr. Anja König, Managing Director, Novartis Venture Fund:
“We are pleased to help energize the Basel region’s center of gravity for European healthcare ventures, offering startups the support they need to accelerate their ideas.”

Uwe Schoenbeck, Chief Scientific Officer, External Research and Development Innovation & Senior Vice President, Worldwide Research and Development, Pfizer:
“Through Pfizer’s support of BaseLaunch, we hope to advance the pace at which promising science is translated into potential medicines.”

 

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Yannick Guerdat : une success story made in Jura

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Austausch unlimited: Grenzüberschreitende Industrie 4.0

07.11.2017

report BaselArea.swiss

Basel initiative supports life sciences start-ups

01.02.2017

BaseLaunch, an accelerator initiative launched and run by the location promotion organisation BaselArea.swiss, is a new partner of the start-up accelerator Kickstart. Life sciences start-ups will be promoted through a second Kickstart programme.

BaseLaunch, which will be launched on 22 February, is an accelerator initiative that aims to create the next generation of groundbreaking healthcare companies in the Basel region, according to a BaselArea.swiss announcement. The collaboration with Kickstart, one of the Europe’s largest multi-corporate start-up accelerators and an initiative of digitalswitzerland, will contribute towards accomplishing this objective. Kickstart is now starting a second programme.

“With the second edition taking place in Zurich and the extension of the programme to Basel, Kickstart will be one step closer to becoming the largest European start-up accelerator,” said Nicolas Bürer, managing director of digitalswitzerland, in a Kickstart statement. Kickstart describes Basel as a life sciences “hot spot” and says that the partnership will make it possible to “tap into the unexplored innovation potential”.

Kickstart Accelerator will select a shortlist of up to 30 start-ups that will be given the opportunity to develop their ideas in an 11-week programme at Impact Hub Zurich. In addition to life sciences, start-ups from the food sector, fintech, smart cities, and robotics and intelligent systems are also eligible.

The start-ups will receive support from experienced mentors and partner companies, and will have the chance to win up to CHF 25,000 as well as receiving a monthly stipend.

“Cooperation between the start-ups and corporate partners will allow the entrepreneurs to benefit from the corporates’ know-how and large customer networks, as well as enable them to develop new technologies and disruptive products together,” commented Carola Wahl, head of transformation and market management at AXA Winterthur, one of the corporate partners.

Interested start-ups can apply at Kickstart Accelerator.

 

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L’apport des matériaux hautes performances dans le développement de composants et d’outils...

06.11.2017

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University of Basel increases support of Innovation

03.10.2017

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Pascal Bourquard: “We need more freedom: it's essential for creativity”

07.05.2015

At a recent «Out-of-the-Box» event, Pascal Bourquard agreed to give an in-depth interview to i-net innovation networks at his company Biwi in Glovelier, before showing us around his home in the  nearby village. As it happened, his mansion held the key to better understanding the man, who is the father, brother and son of an entrepreneur. Here, very close attention to detail and a clear preference for timeless objects were immediately evident.

In the interview, the businessman talked about his experience as an entrepreneur and his vision of innovation. At 58, Pascal Bourquard is about to embark on a maiden voyage marking the beginning of a new life, one that nobody, least of all him, is calling retirement. It is a trip that, in some ways, represents both a return to his roots and an exploration of the world with which he has engaged from a very early age. A sea journey that also satisfies an existential need for freedom, something vital for creativity.

Do you have to break the mould to think like an entrepreneur?
Pascal Bourquard*: Not necessarily, even though, since I was very little, I've always been the black sheep of the family. Even today, whenever I find myself trapped in a standard way of thinking, I try to break out. I'm a libertarian at heart. At the same time, I still have childlike curiosity and enthusiasm. I'm always raving about my latest discovery. My mother used to call me «Mr Gadget».

What other qualities go together with entrepreneurial spirit?
I think you need to be generous and not motivated by personal gain. You shouldn't be too calculating. Having a vision is essential. You need to know how to bring people together and how to share.

Is this something you've always known or something you've learnt during your career?
At the start, I was quite rebellious and anti-conformist. It took a while to learn that we never know, as Jean Gabin once sang.

Can you teach someone how to be an entrepreneur?
It can't be taught, unfortunately. You're either born with it or you’re not. That said, as you grow older you draw on certain knowledge, experience and contacts.

How do you view the current state of the Swiss economy?
With some defeatism, unfortunately. The diversity of paths leading to entrepreneurship — like mine — has been swept away by group think. Politicians are out of touch with economic reality.

What annoys you most in life?
There is too much emphases on making people do certain things rather than giving them greater freedom for thinking and creativity. Communist regimes have been forced to open up. Democracies continue to close in on themselves, to become trapped by restrictive dogmas.

Do you think that these constraints inhibit creativity?
I'm convinced of it. My twelve-year-old son, for example, is completely conditioned by video games and screens. When I take him to the circus, he's passive, because the images he sees on screen are far more impressive. When the extraordinary becomes permanent, we struggle when experiencing the ordinary.

How, then, can we revive some form of creative freedom?
We are lucky to have freedoms. We must exercise them and begin by voting for the right people. We need to create the conditions in which young people who perhaps have an apprenticeship rather than a university education can set up their own businesses; and without unnecessarily burdening them with high taxes. I think we should help young people who have completed an apprenticeship to become business people. I have little trust in politicians. I do, however, believe in young people when they are given freedom.

What is the right work-life balance?
That's a good question and one that is difficult to give a general answer to. What I can say, however, is that over the years I've learnt that having time to myself is very beneficial.

What else do you need to start a company?
Big international banks would do well to stop speculating and return to their roots, which is to say taking risks in supporting young entrepreneurs. Speculation is destructive and banks no longer know how to take the right risks. Most entrepreneurs want to create a buzz straight away to sell things. As far as I'm concerned, the success of a business lies in its longevity.  To last, you need to know how to be self-critical.

Is that your advice to young entrepreneurs?
When young entrepreneurs come to see me with a plan, I advise them to think long term. It's a vital message.

Do you foster a particular spirit of innovation in your companies?
Even if you have excellent champagne, it will not sparkle unless opened. The same goes for employees.

And how do you work?
Through listening, dialogue and training.

What form do you think future innovation will take?
It will undoubtedly be related to energy and the natural resources that we continue to use up. I believe in human ingenuity, despite the pessimism of some of my comments.

Will the third generation of Bourquards who will soon succeed you follow the same route?
I trust my children. I've conditioned them well... in freedom (laughs).

Interview: i-net

*Pascal Bourquard is a self-made entrepreneur who is active in many sectors like the watchmaking supplying sector, the electronic and microelectronic sector, the identification and security sector, the energy and car-sharing sector. Pascal Bourquard has a commercial and economical background, he is somehow the Richard Branson of Jura.

 

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«Europe is very much about stakeholders, Silicon Valley about shareholders»

21.08.2014

Michael Dillhyon is a US entrepreneur and investor living in Zug. Originally, he moved to Switzerland and only wanted to accompany the exit of a US spin-off company. But a growing family and new plans made him stay – he even discovered he has roots in this small country.

In our interview, Michael Dillhyon talks about his past and latest projects and explains what Swiss entrepreneurs do differently from US entrepreneurs.

What brought you to Switzerland and how did you end up staying in Zug?
Michael Dillhyon*: In 2003, I founded a company in the United States called «Netelligent». And we had an opportunity at Netelligent to spin-off a software company called «ActiveObjects» in Europe. The original plan was to be in Switzerland only for a short time until the exit took place and also to enjoy Europe. But in 2004, about two weeks before we were to leave Switzerland, I came home from the office and my wife said: «I’m pregnant.» We already thought that moving to Switzerland was a big change but on top of that, we were even going to have a child in this country.

Originally, you planned to return to the US afterwards. What was your reason to stay?
We liked our life in Switzerland a lot and saw that it was a good place for our children to grow up, but there is also another side to the story. As you may have noticed, I have quite a unique last name. My father discovered that his grandfather’s original name was «Jaeger-Blützinger» – and he was from Glarus. So you see, we moved to Zug firstly for economic reasons, then we stayed for the family and in the end it turned out that I have my roots in this country!

And the European expansion worked out for Netelligent?
Yes, it just evolved! In the end, ActiveObjects was acquired.

What made you become an investor in Swiss companies?
When I sold my stake in Netelligent and we sold ActiveObjects around 2010, I held some board roles and small jobs. Until then, I was not really involved with Switzerland business wise. I thought this was an interesting country and therefore decided to use my entrepreneurial skills. I travelled around Switzerland and realised that the Swiss do not think of themselves as entrepreneurs. But I can see that the idea of entrepreneurship is very strong in Switzerland; however, most of the people are more «lifestyle entrepreneurs». There is a big difference between this and «growth entrepreneurship». Risk capital doesn’t usually get invested in lifestyle entrepreneurship.

What projects are you following now?
When I travelled around Switzerland to make investments, I found that there weren’t enough companies that were ready that I could invest in. So I wanted to change the whole environment to create more investable alternatives. The idea was to change people’s mind-set. The difference between Europe and America is: The European community is all about stakeholders; but in America, in particular, Silicon Valley, it is about shareholders. The workforce here in Europe is not as flexible as it is in the United States.

There are many who think that Switzerland should be imitating Silicon Valley – what is your opinion?
The conservative market economy and the liberal market economy are very different and Switzerland should not try to be Silicon Valley. What’s missing in Silicon Valley is building sustainable long-term businesses. Everybody expects things to happen in three to five year increments. But a Raiffeisen or a Nestlé in Switzerland has a different approach. That’s why healthcare represents an unbelievable opportunity for Switzerland. These companies need long-term planning. The top 100 health software companies with 50 million or more revenue, aren’t fast-burners. Most of them take some time to reach 50 million in revenue and by that time, they are strong and solid.

So what should Swiss entrepreneurs do better?
I talked to many people here and invested in several small companies in Europe and the US between 2008 and 2012. If I approached a company in Switzerland and wanted to know plausible value-enhancing steps about how they were going to return my invested money, I usually got nice product descriptions but no business idea. It seems that for the engineering type of entrepreneurs in Switzerland, talking about figures and future steps are very difficult. They can tell you everything about their product, but they don’t know how to sell, how much money they need as an investment or when they will be able to return my investment.

But they have a business plan, don’t they?
The problem is that you get a cost-curve that goes up and an investment curve that goes down. But nobody can tell you at which steps you are getting to the break-even. I need to hear whom they will be calling to sell their product to.

So what you are saying is that we need more sales people in Switzerland?
Yes! Switzerland has a great history of micro engineering and bioinformatics; it’s the life sciences Mecca! It has the highest number of Nobel Prize winners per capita. But if you ignore Novartis and Roche, there are not many innovative companies left. The Swiss Government is very brave. It puts a lot of money on the table for early stage life sciences research. The problem is, the companies receiving the money need to sell their ideas to investors, to clients and to the media, etc.

But how can innovation be fuelled then?
Clusters of innovation are driving the innovation and building ecosystems. Rather than taking Swiss entrepreneurs to boot camps in Silicon Valley, we need more people who want to be part of this environment like lawyers, designers or marketing people. Because that’s the great thing about Silicon Valley, you can be in any room and create a team overnight because you have all the experts there.

So there aren’t enough talented people in the startup environment?
In the US, everybody is eager to work for equity and wants to be part of the next Facebook. But in Switzerland, nobody wants to be paid in shares and the most talented people take high-level jobs in large pharma companies and in the financial industry.

The big Swiss companies that make up for the innovation index were not built with venture money but with bootstrap money i.e. private people financing them. Is that still a good approach?
I totally believe in this. It shouldn’t be your goal to sell the company; you should rather see if you can sell your stuff. In Switzerland, we have far too many accelerators and incubators where companies easily get seed money! That is not enough; we need to build an ecosystem!

Doesn’t an ecosystem build itself? There is no agency of Silicon Valley.
No it doesn’t build itself; you need to seed the ecosystem. I believe that Silicon Valley got started because of the success of one company called «Fairchild Semiconductors» that triggered the development of the area. Here in Switzerland, we have the pharma business, but none of the big players has a real pipeline. Facebook for example has a serious, game-changing plan underneath the hood but I don’t see this in pharma. Switzerland is a great country to start something in - it is small and has a great setup to build a company. I think we would have a Fairchild in Switzerland if the key players were not so closed and so large. A very innovative company in the healthcare space is needed.

So your big bet on the future is «Healthbank». What is this?
«Healthbank» started in June 2012 and we have a long-term plan. The idea behind it is a platform to hopefully create the next Fairchild. In healthcare, it is still very difficult to trade data back and forth. There are many platforms to have data on, but you can’t trade it. Without a central platform, there is no open healthcare data and therefore, there is no collaboration. A company like Google can’t trade your data, because another big player like Microsoft will never plug into that. A middle ground is needed and our system, Healthbank, is completely unbiased. It’s self-sustainable and we have deep trust and complete interoperability. We started it as a Genossenschaft because this legal form has a long-standing tradition in Switzerland. The idea is that if you give us your personal health data, you become a member of the Genossenschaft.

What is Healthbank doing with my data?
Healthbank is not storing the data, but instead the transactions happening with your data – like credit cards. As a Genossenschaft, we have the trust of people. We are interoperable because the data can be shared through our platform and it acts as an intermediary. It is scalable because health data means a lot of money, as there is a very long supply chain and there are a lot of cross-sectional data. If a pharma company needs data for a study, we can tell you that and you can make the decision. You tell us if you would like to provide your data and then pharma receives it. Plus you receive a bit of money for your participation – it’s very simple.

How has this idea been developed so far?
Healthbank is still going through funding, as it was a bit difficult to find risk capital for a Genossenschaft. Personally, I’m leaving Healthbank as CEO for my next venture, which is to kick off a disruptive biosensor company in Europe. But I believe so strongly in the idea of healthbank, that upon my decision to step down as CEO, I made sure the reigns would be passed to a strong Swiss leader in eHealth. Mr. Reto Schegg is the new CEO of healthbank.

Interview: Thomas Brenzikofer and Nadine Nikulski, i-net

*Michael Dillhyon was until mid-2014 the Founder/CEO of Geneva-based Healthbank, a citizen-owned, global open health data cooperative. In 2013, he was the first Entrepreneur-in-Residence (EIR) for SystemsX, Switzerland’s largest (800M CHF) early stage life sciences fund, and served as a mentor for the ETH Entrepreneurship Lab. Prior to 2013, Mr. Dillhyon served as Chairman of Genebio, a bioinformatics software firm, and sat on the Strategic Advisory Committee for HealthTIES, an EU-backed consortium of four of Europe’s top regions in biosciences, medical technology and health entrepreneurship.

Previous to his move to Switzerland in 2004, Michael Dillhyon co-founded two US-based firms: Netelligent Corporation and ActiveObjects, where he held the roles of President, Chairman and CEO respectively. Mr. Dillhyon holds degrees in Biochemistry and Anthropology, as well as a MBA from the Olin School of Business.

 

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«With the innovation park, the life sciences hub of Northwest Switzerland will secure its ...

09.07.2014

Professor Joachim Seelig has been Professor of Biophysics at the University of Basel since the inception of the Biozentrum and is still actively engaged in research. He is also on the board of the SIP NWCH association (Swiss Innovation Park of Northwest Switzerland) and is Head of the i-net Technology Field of Life Sciences. In an interview with i-net he speaks about the future of the life sciences and explains why the SIP NWCH is important for Basel as a research center.

The pharmaceutical hub of Basel - and Northwest Switzerland - is undisputed today. Will this still be the case in 30 years?
Joachim Seelig*: It’s natural to wonder what will be in 30 years’ time. When I came to Basel 40 years ago, there were only chemical companies here. In the big four of Ciba, Geigy, Sandoz and Roche, the research heads were qualified chemists. Today these positions are occupied by molecular biologists or medical specialists. The chemical industry has been transformed in the last few decades into a pharmaceutical industry. Clariant is still a chemical company, and the agrochemical company Syngenta has its headquarters here, although they are far less deeply anchored in the region than Roche and Novartis. So when we look back, we see that Basel has changed a lot as a research center, and this change will also continue in the next 30 years.

What part did the Biozentrum of the University of Basel play in this development?
The Biozentrum brought together various sciences, such as chemistry, physics, biochemistry, structural biology, microbiology and pharmacology. The founding fathers of the Biozentrum had an inkling of the revolutionary changes to come from biophysics and molecular biology, it was hoped that the collaboration of these various disciplines could lead to something completely new. I believe it was a very shrewd move to bring these different fields together, and it has indeed also had some important results.

And where does the Biozentrum stand today?
Today, the focus is very much on fields such as neurobiology and microbiology, while biophysics and pharmacology take more of a back seat. This may well make sense and bring majors successes. But my personal interest goes in other directions.

So where should the focus be instead?
For the input on the Swiss Innovation Park of Northwest Switzerland, interviews were held with around 30 people from the life sciences with the aim of establishing what subjects will play an important role in the future. Three subject areas were identified in the process. Firstly, there is Biosensing, which links biology and electronics - so-called electroceuticals, for example, are pills that do not deliver their active substance until they arrive at a predetermined site in the body. The second subject area is Biomaterials – an example here could be a seed in which every grain is packed in an energy package, which even provides nutrition and develops when it is sown in dry conditions. The third subject area is Large Number Crunching - the ever more personalized medicine is leading to huge volume of data; so methods need to be developed that support the doctor in efficiently analyzing and evaluating the data.

How well positioned is Northwest Switzerland in terms of these three megatrends?
It has to be realistically acknowledged that we are not very strong in almost all three areas. It is precisely this that the Swiss Innovation Park Northwest Switzerland, which will start up at the beginning of 2015 in Allschwil, is designed to change.

Are there already concrete projects?
Yes, the research project Miracle of Hans-Florian Zeilhofer and Philippe Cattin from the Department of Biomedical Engineering in the Medical Faculty of the University of Basel will be the first sub-tenant. The Werner Siemens Foundation, based in Zug, will support this project for five years to the tune of 15.2 million francs in total. The aim of the project is to miniaturize laser technology for endoscopic surgery. Many areas, such as robotics, imaging and diagnostics, sensor technology and micromechanics, play a role in this project. Roughly speaking, it is a medical technology project in which electronics, robotics, imaging and medicine come together.

How big will the innovation park be in the future?
It is assumed that 1000 people and later perhaps 2000 people will be employed there. This critical mass is essential. A role model here could be the technology park in Eindhoven. Ten years ago, Philips opened its research center there with about 2000 employees for collaboration with external groups and companies. Today around 8000 people work there, and sales of around a billion francs are generated. Many new companies have settled there. The engagement of companies such as Roche, Novartis, Actelion and Syngenta will be crucial for the SIP NWCH. But of course outside companies and start-ups have to be attracted.

The University of Basel is not regarded as very innovative; does something not have to happen there?
I cannot let this statement stand unchallenged. Only recently a study was conducted on how efficiently a university works – and the University of Basel came out of this very well. The University of Basel is a full university. The natural sciences represent only a small part, i.e. at most around 2000 of the 12,000 students in total. So the figures of Basel University cannot be compared directly with the ETH or EPFL, which can concentrate entirely on technologies. At the Biozentrum we are engaged mainly in basic research, while applied research is left to others. Nevertheless we have generated a number of spin-offs. For example, Santhera and 4-Antibodies had their first laboratories in the Biozentrum.

What could be done to get more spin-offs in the region?
Attractive conditions must be created in the innovation park, and scouting ought to be institutionalized at the university, so that more projects are developed. I think we are ideally situated here in Northwest Switzerland. The innovation potential in Basel at least is huge, and there are already many start-ups that are doing outstanding work.

Are there issues that Northwest Switzerland could miss out on?
One point that is rather underestimated in Basel is the influence of computer science and the internet on biology and the life sciences. When it comes to information technology we certainly have some catching-up to do. Personally I believe in a stronger link between biology and electronics. I already endeavored some years ago to establish a department for bioelectronics at the university, but I was unable to push it through. But in the innovation park it is essential that we establish this link. It is important to attract the right talents. It is not only Google that should be attractive for really good IT specialists in the future, but also companies such as Roche and Novartis.

You have been involved in i-net as Head of the Technology Field Life Sciences for some years – what role should, can, ought i-net increasingly play in this field?
Basically people are grateful for and in many cases also excited by what i-net is doing for them. As a neutral link between the various actors, i-net can and will also play a major role in the Swiss Innovation Park in future. The life sciences companies are experiencing frequent personnel changes due in many cases to the global operations of these companies. It is becoming ever more difficult to find contact partners who have the authority to make decisions and at the same time have a profound knowledge of our region. The decision makers in the private sector are too tied up in the requirements of their jobs to find time for honorary activities in important bodies in our region. Life in the private sector has become faster and more global, and the local and regional networks suffer as a result. It is therefore important that a professional organization in the shape of i-net takes on this role and institutionalizes it.

Interview: Stephan Emmerth and Nadine Nikulski, i-net

*Professor Joachim Seelig was one of the first researchers of the Biozentrum at the University of Basel and was Head of this Department between 1997 and 1999 and also from 2000 to 2009. He is a member of the board of the SIP NWCH association (Swiss Innovation Park Northwest Switzerland) and serves in an honorary capacity as Head of the i-net Technology Field Life Sciences.

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Michael Bornhäusser: «Schweizer Start-ups werkeln zu lange in der Comfort-Zone vor sich he...

03.04.2014

Als Gründungspräsident war Michael Bornhäusser der Spiritus Rector von i-net. Nach seinem Rücktritt im Februar 2014 wird sich der Serial Entrepreneur als ehrenamtliche Leiter auf den i-net Bereich Finance & Partner Netzwerk konzentrieren.

Im Interview erklärt Michael Bornhäusser, warum die Schweiz in vielen Bereichen vom internationalen Venture Capital gemieden wird und was in der Startup-Förderung zu tun ist, damit sich dies ändert. Michael Bornhäusser ist Mitinhaber der Basler Sallfort Privatbank und leitet dort den Bereich Private Equity, Products & Service.

Herr Bornhäusser, als zurücktretender Gründungs-Präsident von i-net überlassen Sie ihr Kind nun seinem Lauf. Wie sind Sie mit der Entwicklung zufrieden?
Michael Bornhäusser: Im grossen und ganzen können wir sehr zufrieden sein mit dem erreichten. Operativ sind wir gut aufgestellt, das Team funktioniert. Wir haben innerhalb von knapp zwei Jahren unser Netzwerk auf über 5500 Personen verdoppelt und mit rund 50 Veranstaltungen im vergangen Jahr 2500 Teilnehmende erreicht. i-net wird heute in der gesamten Region Nordwestschweiz wahrgenommen. Wo wir uns sicher noch verstärken müssen, ist in der Startup-und Investorenszene.

Wo sehen sie künftig die Schwerpunkte von i-net?
Es muss uns nun gelingen, noch mehr Multiplikatoren an Board zu holen, indem wir den Kreis von Ehrenamtlichen, die in unserem Netzwerk tatkräftig mitwirken wollen, vergrössern. Auch bei der Gründung neuer Unternehmen muss i-net eine noch wichtigere Rolle spielen als bislang.

Als Vielreisender haben Sie den Vergleich: Wo sehen Sie die Stärken in der Region Nordwestschweiz?
Biotech und Life Sciences sind ganz klar unser USP. Allerdings gewinnt die Interdisziplinarität zu unseren anderen Technologiefeldern, ICT, Cleantech, Medtech oder Nanotechnologien an Bedeutung.

Und wo sehen Sie die Schwächen der Region?
Die grosse Schwäche in der Nordwestschweiz sind die Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen. Es werden einfach zu wenige Spin-offs generiert, weil man im Bereich Company Building kaum Kompetenzen hat. i-net müsste hier unbedingt in die Bresche springen und aktiver auf diese Institutionen zugehen. Umgekehrt müssen sich die Universitäten und Fachhochschulen gegenüber diesem Thema öffnen. Im Zweifelsfall geht dies halt nicht ohne politischen Druck.

Was meinen Sie damit genau?
In Extremis müsste man halt den Geldhahn abstellen. Neben der Bildung und Forschung gehört es doch ganz klar mit zum Leistungsauftrag einer Universität, im Innovationsbereich Wertschöpfung zu schaffen. Nun sind Universitätsprofessoren in der Regel keine Unternehmer und das ist bis zu einem bestimmten Grad ja auch richtig so. Aber es braucht eben auch die Einsicht seitens dieser Institutionen, dass dem so ist, und dass es Partnerorganisationen braucht, die diesen Teil ihres Leistungsauftrages - nämlich das Unternehmertum zu fördern - besser machen.

An den Universitäten in den USA ist das aber anders, dort spielt Entrepreneurship eine gewichtige Rolle und man ist auch erfolgreich darin?
Das liegt daran, dass diese Universitäten sehr stark auf Fremdfinanzierung und damit von Spenden ehemaliger Studenten angewiesen sind. Deshalb hat eine amerikanische Hochschule auch ein grosses Selbstinteresse daran, dass aus Absolventen erfolgreiche Unternehmer werden. Denn diese werden später aus Dankbarkeit für die Ausbildung und aus gesellschaftlicher Verpflichtung, einen Teil ihres Erfolges an die Uni zurückgeben. Bei uns hingegen bekommt es schnell einmal ein «Geschmäckle», wenn etwa eine Bank einer Hochschule Geld zur Verfügung stellen.

Sie finden also das US-Modell besser. Immerhin gilt die Schweiz in allen Rankings punkto Ausbildungsstand ihrer Arbeitskräfte als Spitzenreiter?
Schon, aber laut diversester Ranking befinden sich die besten Universitäten der Welt in den USA sowie in England. Das angelsächsische Prinzip funktioniert also. Und es ist auch so, dass die angelsächsischen Länder die erfolgreichsten Neugründungen hervorbringen. Es ist schwierig hierzulande einen qualitativ hochwertigen Deal Flow für Investoren aufzubauen. Ganz anderes in den USA und England. Dort gibt es professionelle Setups, vielversprechende Cases mit grossem Gewinnpotenzial.

Aber Start-ups werden doch nicht ausschliesslich an Universitäten generiert?
Deshalb ist es in meinen Augen auch ein grosser Fehler, dass man hierzulande in der Startup-Förderung so eindeutig auf Universitäten fokussiert. Wir haben bereits festgestellt, dass - den Biotech-Bereich mal ausgenommen - die Erfolgsaussichten von Schweizer Start-ups, die direkt an Universitäten inkubiert wurden, relativ gering sind. Die Universitäten spielen in Relation zu dem, was sie an Förderungsmitteln von der Regierung bekommen, nur eine ganz kleine Rolle. Die erfolgreichsten Startups gemessen am Unternehmenswert beim Exit sind universitätsunabhängig als Spin-offs von Grossunternehmen entstehen. Typische Beispiel aus der Region Basel sind etwa Actelion oder Polyphor.

Fehlt es nicht einfach an Entrepreneurial Spirit?
Eindeutig. Die Ambitionen sind meist zu tief und die Unternehmen werden zu früh verkauft. Man gibt sich zufrieden, wenn man mit einem Startup ein paar Millionen Franken Umsatz erzielt und beim Verkauf einen tiefen zweistelligen Millionenbetrag löst. Deshalb ist die Schweizer Startup-Szene für global agierende Venture Capitalists nicht interessant. Diese steigen erst ein, wenn ein Exil dreistelliger Millionenhöhe in Aussicht steht. Schweizer Startups sollten ihre Ziele höher stecken. Doch dazu braucht es die entsprechenden Vorgaben der Investoren. Leider muss ich immer wieder beobachten, dass viele Startups hierzulande zu lange in der Comfort-Zone vor sich her werkeln können, weil die Business Angels zu viel Geld geben und zu wenig Druck machen.

Ist es nicht gar kontraproduktiv, wenn in der Schweiz einfach nur Unternehmen produziert werden, um sie später ins Ausland zu verkaufen. Dadurch wird doch keine nachhaltige Wertschöpfung generiert?
Das kann man auch anders sehen. Wenn wir in der Schweiz 10 Exits für 100 Millionen schaffen, dann sind das 1 Milliarde Wertschöpfung, die generiert werden und von dem ein grosser Teil in unserem Land bleibt. Als CH-Hightech KMU muss man sich sowie so von Anfang an global aufstellen. Hier hat die Schweiz aufgrund der existierenden Strukturen einen riesigen Vorteil.

Es gibt aber viele Unternehmer, die gar nicht mit VC-Geld aufgepumpt werden wollen um dann verkauft zu werden, sondern auf organisches Wachstum setzen. Ist das nicht auch legitim?
Natürlich. Als Gründer muss man sich einfach überlegen, was man will. i-net versteht sich ja keineswegs nur als Start-up-Plattform, wir bieten unsere Services ja auch dem klassischen KMU. Hierbei gilt es, Unternehmern ihre Wachstums- und Innovationspotentiale aufzuzeigen und sie mit unserem Netzwerk darin zu unterstützen, diese zu realisieren.

Dennoch, braucht es auch da Fremdfinanzierung. Gibt es denn keine Alternative zu Private Equity?
Die aktuelle Regulierungsvorgabe, Basel III, macht es tatsächlich sehr schwierig für eine Bank, Wachstumsvorhaben zu finanzieren, da sie in der Pflicht stehen, sehr viel mehr Eigenkapital hinterlegen zu müssen. Im Prinzip erhält ein Unternehmen nur noch dann Kredit, wenn es das Geld sowieso schon hat. Die Politik hat da im Prinzip einen Investitionsstopp veranlasst, mit dem Effekt, dass Expansionsvorhaben nur noch über Private Equity finanziert werden können. Gerade dies stellt die Schweiz vor grosse Herausforderungen. Deshalb müssen wir auch dringend attraktiver werden für das global agierenden Venture Capital. Und nochmals: dies gelingt nur, wenn unsere Unternehmen und ihre Business Angels aggressiver werden.
Ich habe kürzlich gelesen, dass 80 bis 90 Prozent aller Angel Investments hierzulande verloren gehen. Bei professionellen Investoren ist es gerade umgekehrt.

Hat das nicht auch damit zu tun, dass VCs später einsteigen, wenn das Risiko geringer ist?
Das sehe ich anders. Es wird meist falsch investiert und die Unternehmer werden nicht richtig unterstützt. Wir müssen dringen professionelle Strukturen schaffen, wie Accelerators und Innovationsparks. Besonders in den Life Sciences könnte man sehr viel mehr tun. In deinem Bereich gibt es zwei Städte die einem einfallen: Boston und Basel. Und ich bin sicher, dass Novartis, Roche oder Actelion sich beteiligen würden an einem entsprechenden Programm. Denn ein solches bringt auch für sie noch mehr Know-How in die Region, von dem sie wiederum profitieren können.

Und die anderen Technologiefelder?
Auch in den Nanotechnologien sehe grosses unmittelbares Potenzial. Bei den anderen Bereichen wird der Aufbau sehr viel länger dauern. Aber nichtsdestotrotz sollte man das machen. Zudem gibt es zwischen den Bereichen interessante Berührungspunkte, die man ausschöpfen sollte. Und hierzu können wir mit i-net die ideale Plattform bieten.

Interview: Thomas Brenzikofer

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«Nicht der Standort sondern die regionale Stärke steht im Zentrum»

Die Schweiz sucht nach möglichen Standorten für den Swiss Innovation Park. Und die Region Nordwestschweiz ist gleich mit zwei Projekten («Schweizer Innovationspark Region Nordwestschweiz» und «PARK innovAARE») im Wettbewerb. Ob sich die beiden Parks konkurrieren und was das Label Swiss Innovation Park für sie bedeutet, erklären André Moeri sowie Giorgio Travaglini im folgenden Interview:

Wozu braucht es Innovationsparks, und warum gleich in der Nordwestschweiz?
André Moeri*: Ob es Innovationsparks wirklich braucht, ist eine Frage der Definition. Innovationsparks sind vor allem dann sinnvoll, wenn sie so konzipiert werden, dass sie in der Wertkette der Unternehmensgründung den Techno- und Businessparks vorgelagert sind. Der Fokus liegt auf forschungsnahen Projekten und Produkten, die im Innovationspark schnell zur Marktreife gebracht werden. Insofern ist der Innovationspark eine Art Katalysator, wo Projekte reinkommen und beschleunigt als Unternehmen wieder rauskommen, um dann in der entsprechenden Infrastruktur in der Umgebung angesiedelt zu werden, eben etwa in den Business- oder Technologieparks.

Der Innovationspark als Inkubator, ist auch der PARK innovAARE so konzipiert?
Giorgio Travaglini*:
Mit dem PARK innovAARE entsteht ein Ort, wo die Spitzenforschung des Paul Scherrer Instituts und die Innovationstätigkeit der anzusiedelnden Unternehmen effizient kombiniert werden. Das PSI möchte seine Aktivitäten im Bereich des Technologietransfers weiter ausbauen und seine Forschungs- und Technologiekompetenzen verstärkt Unternehmen zugänglich machen. Durch den PARK innovAARE kann die Zusammenarbeit des PSI mit der Wirtschaft weiter vertieft werden. Die Realisierung kompletter Wertschöpfungsketten unter einem Dach – von der anwendungsorientierten Grundlagenforschung bis hin zur Technologieverwertung durch die Unternehmen – ermöglicht einen überaus effizienten Kompetenz- und Technologietransfer. Der PARK innovAARE ist somit eine unternehmerische Erweiterung für das PSI und vice versa und ermöglicht die Realisierung gross-skaliger Projekte mit und durch die Industrie.

Könnte man also sagen, während der PARK innovAARE sehr eng ans PSI gebunden ist, lehnt sich der Innovationspark Nordwestschweiz eher an die Pharmaindustrie an?
Moeri:
Hierzulande werden laut Bundesamt für Statistik nur rund ein Viertel der Forschungs- und Entwicklungsgelder von Hochschulen getragen, der Rest wird von der Privatwirtschaft geleistet. Damit ist die Schweiz im internationalen Vergleich ein Spezialfall. Von den R&D-Investitionen der Privatwirtschaft konzentrieren sich wiederum 40 Prozent in der Nordwestschweiz. Dieses weltweit einmalige Ökosystem rund um die Life Sciences-Industrie möchten wir zusätzlich stützen und den Innovationspark als wichtiger Teil der Wertschöpfungskette positionieren.
Travaglini: Der PARK innovAARE ist vorrangig ein Projekt der Wirtschaft und wird unter anderem durch global tätige Unternehmungen wie ABB oder Alstom sowie durch KMU getragen. Mit der räumlichen Nähe zum PSI - zur Verfügung stehen insgesamt 5,5 Hektar - mit seinen hoch spezialisierten Forschungs- und Technologiekompetenzen bildet der PARK innovAARE für Unternehmen sämtlicher Branchen ein optimales Umfeld, um Innovationen voranzutreiben und diese schneller zur Marktreife zu bringen.

Warum sollte sich eine Novartis, Roche oder Syngenta am Innovationspark anschliessen, diese haben doch eigene Labors und wollen doch nicht mithelfen, künftige Mitbewerber zu inkubieren?
Moeri:
Es geht natürlich nicht um die bessere Forschungs- und Entwicklungs-Infrastruktur. Es wäre vermessen, hier mit den besten der Welt konkurrieren zu wollen. Unser Vorteil ist, dass wir eine neutrale Plattform bieten, auf der unterschiedliche Exponenten aus ganz unterschiedlichen Bereichen kooperieren können. Im Zentrum stehen nicht nur die klassische Medikamentenentwicklung, sondern auch Innovationen in Life Sciences an deren Schnittstellen Vermischungen mit Medtech, Nano und ICT möglich sind.

Und hierfür haben sie auch das Commitments aus der Industrie?
Moeri:
Ja, auf der Stufe Absichtserklärung haben wir die Zusagen aller wichtigen Player. Wir hatten ja insgeheim gehofft, dass die grossen Firmen wohlwollend auf unser Projekt reagieren würden. Das Echo war dann aber überwältigend: «Endlich jemand, der nicht nur Geld will, sondern auch etwas anbietet», so der Tenor.

Wo steht diesbezüglich der PARK innovAARE?
Travaglini:
Das PSI hat innerhalb der Schweiz eine einmalige Position. Die Grossforschungsanlagen, die wir entwickeln, bauen und betreiben, gibt es in dieser Kombination nur am PSI. Diese ermöglichen Untersuchungen und Entwicklungen, die nirgendwo anders in der Schweiz möglich sind – daher sind wir, vor allem im Bereich der anwendungsorientierten Grundlagenforschung, für innovative Unternehmen per se interessant. Bereits haben etwa 20 international und national tätige Gross- und Kleinunternehmen ihre langfristige, finanzielle Unterstützung sowie die aktive Mitwirkung an der strategischen Entwicklung des PARK innovAARE zugesichert. Diese Trägerschaft soll in den nächsten Monaten noch erweitert werden. Stark vertreten sind Grossunternehmen aus der Energiebranche, die mit unserem Knowhow gemeinsame Projekte lancieren möchten.

Ist PARK innovAARE mehr auf etablierte Unternehmen aus und weniger auf Start-ups?
Travaglini:
Im PARK innovAARE sind sowohl etablierte Unternehmen als auch Neugründungen, wie beispielsweise Spin-Offs des PSI, willkommen. Hinsichtlich Entrepreneurship werden wir hier eng mit der Hochschule für Wirtschaft der FHNW zusammenarbeiten, welche den Neugründungen mit ihren Kompetenzen beratend zur Seite stehen wird. Somit wollen wir mit dem PARK innovAARE das Thema Entrepreneurship noch weiter ausbauen.

Dagegen fokussiert der Innovationspark in Basel auf Entrepreneurship?
Moeri:
Ja und nein. Wir möchten vor allem Projekte, die aus der Industrie kommen, zu Spinn-offs machen. Eine wichtige Komponente ist, Projekte in unserer Region zu behalten, die sonst abwandern, weil sie nicht - oder nicht mehr - in die Unternehmensstrategie der Grossunternehmen passen würden. Wenn etwa eine Produktentwicklung gestoppt wird, weil sich die Strategien der Grosskonzerne geändert haben, können wir mit der Vernetzungsfunktion des SIP NWCH das Projekt in einem neuen Set-up weiter treiben. Wir haben in der Region einige Firmen, die bewiesen haben, dass dies funktioniert. Paradebeispiele sind Actelion oder Rolic, die beide aus der Roche heraus entstanden sind. Der SIP NWCH soll diese Beispiele multiplizieren können.

Inwiefern ist auch eine Zusammenarbeit vorgesehen?
Moeri:
Im internationalen Vergleich ist die Grünfläche zwischen Basel und Zürich ein grösserer Park. Die Distanzen in der Schweiz sind nach globalem Massstab vernachlässigbar. Der Innovationspark Basel und der PARK innovAARE haben schriftlich festgehalten, dass wir zusammenarbeiten werden. Denn der PARK innovAARE hat klare Spezialgebiete und sollten wir Anfragen erhalten, die in den PARK innovAARE gehören, werden wir diese dahin weiterleiten. Auch umgekehrt wird es so sein, dass Projekte aus dem Life Sciences-Bereich zu uns kommen sollen.
Travaglini: Beide Standorte haben eine klare thematisch-inhaltliche Ausrichtung und sind hinsichtlich der Innovationsschwerpunkte wertvolle Ergänzungen füreinander, daher sind regelmässige Austausch-Gespräche vorgesehen. Wichtig ist jedoch auch, wie der Nationale Innovationspark im internationalen Wettbewerb von aussen als Ganzes wahrgenommen wird und bestehen kann. Es geht darum, eine möglichst komplette Palette von Forschungs- und Dienstleistungen, R&D Infrastruktur, Labors, Knowhow, IP und Fachkräften anzubieten. Daher ist es verwirrend für unsere Zielgruppe, von Basel, Aargau oder Zürich zu reden, denn im internationalen Kontext ist es das Gebiet zwischen «Zürich West» und «Basel Ost». Global agierende Unternehmen holen sich die Leistungen ohnehin dort ab, wo sie ihnen am besten angeboten werden. Insofern bin ich ein Anhänger davon, dass sich die einzelnen Standorte gezielt und komplementär auf ihre Stärken fokussieren.

Geht es auch darum, neue Unternehmen aus dem Ausland anzusiedeln oder soll die Schweiz eher von innen heraus wachsen?
Moeri:
Man sollte nicht nur versuchen, Firmen aus dem Ausland in die Schweiz zu bringen, sondern auch berücksichtigen, dass es innerhalb des bestehenden Ökosystems viele Firmen gibt, die ausgebaut werden können und dass in der Region viel Potential vorhanden ist. Firmen aus dem Ausland im Life-Sciences Cluster anzusiedeln unterstützen wir in Zusammenarbeit mit den bestehenden Organisationen natürlich.

Zwei Innovationsparks sind gesetzt: Einer in Lausanne und einer in Zürich. Nun ist der Run auf weitere Parks lanciert. Wo stehen da Aargau und Basel?
Moeri:
Wir haben ein fundiertes Dossier für die Bewerbung der Kantone BL, BS und JU eingegeben und sind zuversichtlich, dass wir ein Teil des Schweizer Innovationsparkes werden. Travaglini: Expertenmeinungen zufolge hat der PARK innovAARE mit seiner inhaltlichen und konzeptionellen Ausrichtung gute Chancen auf einen Netzwerkstandort. Wir freuen uns, dass die Medien diese Einschätzung teilen, zum Beispiel die NZZ in ihrer Ausgabe vom 28. März diesen Jahres.
Moeri: Nicht der Standort sollte für ausländische Interessenten im Mittelpunkt stehen, sondern das jeweilige Fachgebiet, das sich aus der regionalen Stärke ergibt. Unter dem Label Swiss Innovation Park bekommen die bereits existierenden Schwerpunkte in Forschung und Entwicklung ein Gesicht gegen aussen. Das finde ich hervorragend.

Es geht also darum, einen Brand zu schaffen, der eine ähnliche Wirkung entfaltet wie das Silicon Valley?
Travaglini:
Ja, mit dem Swiss Innovation Park kann sich die Schweiz ganz klar im europäischen und globalen Wettbewerb positionieren. Damit ergreift unser Land eine einmalige Chance. Aber man muss auch den Mut haben zur Fokussierung auf die eigenen Stärken. So gesehen ist das Silicon Valley als Label sicher ein Vorbild.

Wie geht es nun konkret weiter? Was sind die nächsten Meilensteine?
Travaglini:
Am 26. Juni wird die Volkswirtschafts-Direktoren-Konferenz über die Vergabe der Netzwerkstandorte entscheiden. In den nächsten Monaten liegt unser Fokus auf der Erarbeitung von Business Cases und Technologieplattformen für die Akquisition von international tätigen Unternehmen.
Moeri: Wir gehen in zwei Phasen vor. In der ersten Phase werden wir einen Initialstandort beziehen. Wir übernehmen dafür bestehende Labors der Actelion. Im nächsten Jahr wollen wir diese rund 3000 Quadratmeter beziehen und dann sehr schnell starten, ohne, dass wir etwas neu bauen müssen. Die Wahrscheinlichkeit ist sehr gross, dass wir dies auch umsetzen, sollten wir das Label nicht erhalten. Dafür haben wir in der Region jetzt schon zu viel bewegt, als dass der Zug jetzt noch aufzuhalten wäre.

Interview: Thomas Brenzikofer, Nadine Aregger

*André Moeri ist Projektleiter des «Schweizer Innovationspark Region Nordwestschweiz» (SIP NWCH). Er baute unter anderem die Firma Medgate mit auf, die mit 250 Mitarbeitenden im Bereich der Telemedizin und der medizinischen Grundversorgung tätig ist.

*Giorgio Travaglini arbeitet seit 2012 als Leiter Technologietransfer am Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen und ist mitverantwortlich für den PARK innovAARE im Kanton Aargau. Davor war er unter anderem als nationaler Ansprechpartner für europäische Forschungsprogramme am Head Office von Euresearch in Bern tätig.

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