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report BaselArea.swiss

“The Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area and the Jura are a match made in heaven”

26.09.2019

The Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area will be opening its Jura site on 25 October. Claude-Henri Schaller, Director of the Office for the Economy and Labour and Vice President of Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area AG, is convinced that the Innovation Park can make a major contribution to the diversification of industry in the Jura and will create stronger ties between industry and research.

BaselArea.swiss: Is it fair to say that the Jura is a watchmaking canton?

Claude-Henri Schaller: I would go as far as to say that there is no such thing as a Swiss watch that isn’t at least partly made in the Jura. The watchmaking industry was the first sector to become established in the Jura – and it still defines the canton today. Currently, around 44 percent of jobs in the Jura are in the secondary sector, more than in any other canton. The international groups Swatch, Richemont, LVMH and Festina all have production sites in the Jura canton. Rolex also works with a lot of local suppliers. But our businesses are also applying their watchmaking expertise to other fields. The medtech sector is growing in importance here.

Is its strong focus on the precision engineering industry a strength or a weakness for the Jura canton?

The canton’s heavy reliance on the industry has pros and cons. On the one hand, export problems have a direct and marked effect on us. On the other hand, when the economy is booming we quickly feel the effects. The economic cycles in the Jura are shorter than in other regions. The unemployment rate can rapidly go up, but can quickly fall again. And we put our extensive expertise in precision engineering to good use in the medtech, mechanical engineering and aviation technology sectors. But our aim is to encourage further diversification in the businesses here.

Why is diversification so crucial to the Jura?

If the watchmaking industry is going through a bad patch, businesses need to have other options for growth and winning new markets. Diversification also creates other societal and economic opportunities: we are currently investing heavily in advanced skills training – we have one of the highest graduate qualification rates in the country. But this investment is not currently paying the dividends we would have liked. By fostering innovation in the Jura canton we are creating opportunities in the fields in which we excel. That enables our businesses to grow – and has positive repercussions for society as a whole. We want to ensure that our highly qualified workforce stays in the Jura or comes back to us.

So there’s room for improvement. Where does the canton intend to start?

In an SME, the boss does more or less everything themselves – carrying out research, generating sales, searching out innovation and new markets. Currently, companies are doing their research and development in house, usually behind closed doors. They are very secretive about it. Although we have the Haute Ecole Arc Neuchatel Berne Jura, we don’t have a research centre specifically for industry. That means that at the moment we’re not getting involved in research early enough or closely enough. But innovation is not about universities or businesses working alone any more. To come up with innovative solutions, industry and academia must work together more closely. The Jura site of the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area is an important building block in this.

In what way?

The political authorities in the Jura canton are pursuing three goals. We want to encourage innovation, support the diversification of industry and foster collaboration between research centres and businesses. With the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area now in the Jura, we have the opportunity to improve the research infrastructure and create closer ties between business, research, science and technology universities and the canton.

What role will the Innovation Park in the Jura play?

The Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area has sites in Basel, Allschwil and now in Courroux in the Jura canton. The site here has the potential to become an enabler, promoting and organising links and projects at supracantonal level. A Jura-based company is now perfectly able to start up a project with Basel University Hospital on the Allschwill site, while a Basel-Stadt project can also make use of the resources in the Jura. With its specialisation, the Jura is a valuable addition to the expertise available in the Basel region. That’s also promising when it comes to developing new products.

How will you convince businesses to collaborate more and to use the Innovation Park in the Jura?

To reach as many SMEs as possible, we are working closely with the Chamber of Commerce, and together with BaselArea.swiss we have formed an advisory board. It’s up to representatives from industry and research to engage with the process of mutual exchange. Of course, we also need to keep businesses informed, working hard to explain the options open to them. The Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area is of course all well and good as a political initiative, but the proof of the pudding lies in tangible projects and results. That’s why our job now is to identify, organise and see through suitable projects.

What sort of projects does the Jura site of the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area have in mind?

The innovation park concept is eminently suited to the Jura and our economy. Our businesses are keen to discuss concrete projects, and by working with research institutes they can get them up and running. On the Jura site of the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area, we are initially concentrating on the healthcare sector. We’re looking at how to improve the organisation of the healthcare sector in the surrounding regions. This may entail innovative processes or new solutions. One project is tackling the shortage of doctors. We are working with nursing staff to come up with innovative solutions for how nurses can take on a wider remit. I am convinced that the healthcare industry has enormous potential for the future. Other projects under the Industry 4.0 banner are set to follow.

What makes you think the Jura site of the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area will be a success?

There’s been an awful lot of interest in creating an Innovation Park in the Jura, much of which has come from businesses. Our first tenant, the IT security firm NextDay.Vision, signed up even before we were open. And we have all the skills required to run an innovation park. In addition, BaselArea.swiss is firmly established in the canton. A network is already in place. I am confident that with the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area we can get something good going here. What’s more, the Innovation Park’s remit is not just to help Jura-based businesses work together – we are open to the entire Basel region. I am very optimistic. The Jura already has a far-reaching reputation for its industrial know-how, and that’s something the Innovation Park can build on.

Interview: Annett Altvater

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"I am amazed by the level of innovation in the Jura"

11.06.2019

The Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area already has two sites, in Allschwil and Basel, and will soon add a third in the Jura. It will be located on the Innodel campus in the municipality of Courroux, between Delémont and Courrendlin. Work is ongoing at the Jura site, which is set to officially open on 25 October.

This will be the culmination of a huge amount of work by various regional stakeholders as part of an ambitious federal project. The aim is to boost research and development in the region in particular and in Switzerland in general, as Frank Kumli, Head of Innovation & Entrepreneurship at BaselArea.swiss says in the interview with "Le Quotidien Jurassien".

Le Quotidien Jurassien: What's the significance of the new Jura site for Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area?

Frank Kumli: It's a step forward for regional innovation. Like the others, the park will be dedicated to accelerating innovation. The Jura will finally be able to participate in the innovation park. It's very important to us for the Jura to be able to join us and for us to be able to draw on the region's skills and knowhow, while at the same time supporting local economic development and innovation. For us at Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area, it's a unique opportunity to lead and support this Jura site.

What are your expectations for the Switzerland Innovation Park in the Jura?

Naturally, we hope it will be a vibrant site, where lots of things happen, where people come together to develop new ideas, discuss ideas and launch innovative projects. It should be an interface between the three cantons of Basel-Stadt, Basel-Landschaft and Jura in the field of innovation.

How many workstations will there be on this site?

In total, we will have a floor space of 1,200 m2, which could equate to sixty or so workstations, some split, so around 30 to 35 jobs.

Has there been any interest yet?

We are working closely with the Jura Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and its director, Pierre-Alain Berret, to promote the innovation park to heads of local SMEs. Several are interested in participating. Local and French start-ups have also expressed interest in setting up at the site.

And what about educational establishments?

On the academic side of things, we have also received interest from the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM), which will have a presence on the site. We have also had discussions with Haute Ecole Arc (HE-Arc) locally to see how we can represent them on the site. We're in the process of signing some contracts. The aim is to have a mix of start-ups, some academic projects and, above all, lots of business projects.

What areas will the Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area in the Jura be active in?

We will have projects in two areas: healthcare and business agility. We're not going to reinvent watchmaking. Instead, we’ll see how local businesses can be transformed, how they can become more agile in responding to the challenges of a changing world. For healthcare, we're working closely with the Jura Hospital and its director Thierry Charmillot, as well as the head of the Jura's Public Health Service, Nicolas Pétremand.

What exactly are you going to do in the field of health?

A consultation exercise is underway with Professor Hans-Florian Zeilhofer of Basel University Hospital. We have several projects planned with him. Professor Zeilhofer specialises in robotics and automation in surgery. He is convinced that there is a great deal of know-how in the Jura that can be put to use in this field. He is already cooperating on projects in the Jura, specifically in the field of 3D printing. With home automation, the idea is to make the home environment safe so that patients can be discharged from hospital more quickly, while also delaying their move to care homes, therefore maximising their time in their own home.

How long do you think it will take to hit your stride?

We're relatively optimistic, given the help that we are receiving from the Chamber of Commerce, the Jura Hospital, the Public Health Service and universities. I think that we should hit our stride in about a year's time, not in terms of jobs total but in terms of having a vibrant site with lots of innovative ideas. We've had lots of help locally to help find the right projects quickly.

What will be developed as part of industry 4.0?

For us, industry 4.0 is, of course, about production technologies. We're going to focus on agility, with an emphasis on the human aspect, teams, business models and, in the background, the technologies necessary for transformation and production. It's about giving SMEs more agility so they can more easily respond to changing demand in terms of the number and type of parts ordered. To do so, you need teams that are much more responsive. We talked about this with the heads of the Chamber of Commerce CCIJ, including the new president Georges Humard. They confirmed that the areas they are interested in are design thinking, agility and lean processes. There will be many seminars, courses, awareness raising events and support.

When it comes to healthcare, what are we talking about exactly?

We have developed three areas through numerous meetings with Professor Zeilhofer, the Jura Hospital and the Chamber of Commerce. The first area will be pure medical technology, with implants and 3D printing, specialisms very close to the Jura's know-how. This will be the biggest focus. The second will be what they call health-tech, which involves connectivity and digital health. Jura Hospital and the Public Health Service believe that there's much to do in the canton. The third area is the health system. Both the Health and Economy Minister, Jacques Gerber, and Nicolas Pétremand are convinced that the Jura's relatively small health system means it can experiment and innovate much more quickly than in other cantons.

Your list also includes setting up projects, funding, leadership, working methods…

We are working to release funds at cantonal level as well as supporting businesses in securing funding at federal level. We have promised to provide them with people who can navigate the bureaucracy of innovation funds, so they can access this funding faster.

What's so special about Jura business culture?

Here, discretion is above anything else. The Jura entrepreneur does everything himself. As a result, there's little visibility of the skills that Jura businesses have. When we speak to businesses from the biomedical engineering group at Allschwil, they often ask us to help them find the right skills in the Jura for their projects. People know that there is a lot of know-how in the Jura, but they don't know how to access it. This suggests businesses must do more to make their skills known. With the Chamber of Commerce, we're going to link up with Basel-Stadt and Basel-Landschaft. An informal group that includes businesspeople, the Jura Hospital and universities will support the innovation park.

Is there a lack of access to a community and network of innovators and experts for research and development in the canton of Jura?

Yes. There is a real appetite for working with the University of Basel, the FHNW School of Engineering and HE Arc at Neuchâtel on the technology side of things. I think that we will be able to create links between Jura entrepreneurs and universities. The clients of Jura entrepreneurs also want these entrepreneurs to collaborate with the universities, we've been told. There is a lot more innovation than people think. Every time I visit a Jura business, I am amazed by the level of innovation. I think it's great to see that, when you talk to Jura businesspeople, they have lots of pragmatism for moving forward.

Interview: Georges Maillard, Le Quotidien Jurassien

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“Here at Bell, we combine handcraft and automation”

06.05.2019

Over the space of 150 years, a butcher’s in Basel has grown into an international food company, with the Bell Food Group now employing more than 12,000 people in 15 countries. Markus Ettlin, Head of Industry 4.0/Automation at the Bell Food Group, provides an update on the company’s current Industry 4.0 projects, the limits of automation, and innovations in the food sector.

BaselArea.swiss: When will robots start making sausages?

Markus Ettlin: An extremely large amount of handcraft, experience and skill goes into making a sausage. At the moment, it would be virtually impossible to have the work done by a machine – that is not our goal either. For us, it’s a balancing act to find the sweet spot between tradition and innovation. When it comes to sausages, tradition and handcraft are extremely important. Robots will not be making sausages in the foreseeable future.

Is this because there is no demand for it?

I believe that our customers want a handmade product and not fully industrialised sausages. A sausage is a natural product with natural characteristics that must be satisfied. A great deal of experience is also required. Whether it’s sausages or ham, production requires a great deal of experience and all of our senses. We are, however, in the process of automating certain sub-processes. We want to combine handcraft and automation.

Which areas are suitable for automation?

We need to distinguish between the handcraft sector and convenience products. Great importance is attached to handcraft in the production of sausages and ham. In the Convenience sector, where products have to be more uniform, the progress made with automation is at a much more advanced stage. For example, the production of hamburger patties and chicken nuggets is highly automated, as they are shaped by machines. We have successfully introduced automation technologies in the Logistics division as well as for repetitive work and physically demanding jobs.

Where do you see the greatest potential?

The degree of automation used in handling and packing tasks is higher than in other areas, but even here human staff are needed. We see great potential in the data and information that is generated on a daily basis. We want to learn from this data and improve ourselves. Let’s look at the cooking process, for example, where data such as temperature is measured. Here, we have target parameters, we have actual parameters, and at the end we have a result. Although the employees check the temperature, they cannot keep track of all of the parameters, the different values and the complex relationships. By analysing this data, we can safeguard and even improve the quality of the cooking process – and thus also the quality of the product. This data analysis also helps us to increase energy efficiency and make optimal use of system capacities.

On which transformations and in which areas is Bell focussing?

On the one hand, we should be able to trace the journey of the product; on the other hand, we should be able to understand why certain steps have been taken in the manufacturing process and what effects these steps have on the finished product. The main areas of focus here are thus standards and standardisation. We want to use standardised technology, transform automated processes and ensure transparency.

Which sectors are particularly interesting as a source of ideas for standardised technologies?

The meat processing specialist area is a leader in this regard. In my area, I am interested more in which technologies can be used for unconventional purposes. For example, if there are procedures and methodologies used in the pharma industry that could also work in the food industry. The pharma industry is able to handle large volumes of data, which is an extremely exciting prospect for my division. The automotive industry, for its part, has made great progress with automated processes. Car manufacturers frequently have to roll our large production runs. Within an individual production run, however, sometimes the steering wheel has to be installed on the left of the chassis, and sometimes on the right. These are topics we have to deal with as well, since we also have products that come in different forms – sometimes lighter, sometimes heavier, some in small packaging and others in large packaging. We like to draw inspiration from other industries.

What is being implemented?

We are building a huge state-of-the-art cold store with an extremely high level of automation. The aim is for logistics to be as fully automated as possible, for employees to spend as little time as possible in the cold store area, and to provide highly automated support processes. All of the systems and processes will generate data and information that we want to analyse in order to implement improvements, carry out maintenance work and raise efficiency. In all areas, the collection of data is an opportunity for us to improve and safeguard our quality levels.

What challenges does the upcoming transformation pose for Bell?

For us, Industry 4.0 is strongly linked to the production environment. Digitisation is a huge step for our employees. We want everyone to be involved and show them that new technologies are there to support them in their work. I also perceive a challenge in the fact that everything is increasing in complexity, that everything is interlinked. This is not always easy to understand. As a result, we also need to build up knowledge and generally raise awareness of Industry 4.0 issues. We additionally need to develop an understanding of where we're going to start with the implementation and how we're going to establish a meaningful roadmap.

Bell is taking part in our Industry 4.0 Challenge. What have you been able to learn from this so far?

I’ve come to know BaselArea.swiss from various events, where we’ve always made interesting contacts. In terms of the Industry 4.0 Challenge, I can easily see which ideas are represented on the market and how others see the world. In the case of large corporations, it’s often not quite as transparent how they’ve come up with their great solutions. Start-ups can quickly present a proof of concept, so I can imagine what it involves and what it would mean for me. This is, in my opinion, extremely exciting. Our division is also in contact with the companies that attended the last Industry 4.0 Challenge. Although we are more on the lookout for standardised tools, start-ups often bridge the gap between a major standard and the real world.

What kind of innovations can we expect to see in the food sector in the near future?

Meat that can be produced without having to kill any animals – the hamburgers produced by Mosa Meat are cultured from cells. Bell holds a stake in the Dutch company, which is currently working on making its concept ready for market.

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33 recently arrived companies create hundreds of jobs

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The efforts of BaselArea.swiss proved extremely successful in 2018. 33 companies – seven more than in the previous year – were persuaded to move to the Basel economic region. 16 companies arrived from Europe, nine of which came from Germany. BaselArea.swiss also supported six Swiss companies in the search for a suitable business location in the Basel region. Of the newly arrived companies, 19 operate in the life sciences and chemicals sectors.

The companies most recently relocated to the Basel economic region have already created 139 jobs and plan to add 296 more over the coming years. The huge interest in the Basel region as a business location was also reflected in the over 400 consultation sessions in Switzerland and abroad and the 69 visits to Basel made by investors and company delegations that were organised by BaselArea.swiss in 2018.

As well as promoting the location, BaselArea.swiss also achieved extremely impressive results in its second key activity: fostering innovation. 72 startups received support from BaselArea.swiss in founding their companies and the number of companies established increased by nine compared to the previous year. The startups were mainly companies operating in the life sciences and ICT sectors.

There was also a sharp rise in the demand for consulting and mentoring. Companies used this service provided by BaselArea.swiss 556 times, which represents a more than three-fold increase compared to the previous year. The events organised by BaselArea.swiss also proved extremely popular and provided around 6,000 participants with an opportunity for networking and generating new ideas.

See the press release here. The complete 2018 BaselArea.swiss annual report can be downloaded as a PDF.

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