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Innovation Events

event Innovation

Innovation Lounge «Le Tout Connecté»

Date: 06.03.2018

Place: Cinémont, Rue Emile-Boéchat 85, 2800 Delémont

BaselArea.swiss, Creapole SA et Raiffeisen Suisse ont le plaisir de vous inviter à l’événement « Innovation Lounge » qui aura lieu le 6 mars 2018 à Delémont.
 
Cette manifestation vous amènera, grâce à des impulsions visionnaires, à découvrir de nouvelles voies dans l’innovation et plus particulièrement dans la PME de production connectée et les données de production sécurisées. Cette rencontre s’adresse aux entrepreneurs, patrons de PME et décideurs qui sont intéressés par l’innovation et la thématique « Le Tout Connecté ».
 
Venez nombreux chercher et échanger de nouvelles idées lors de cette
deuxième édition.

 
Programme

17:30  Accueil des invités
18:00 Ouverture par
M. Domenico Scala
Président, BaselArea.swiss
18:10 Introduction par
M. Patrik Gisel
Président de la Direction, Raiffeisen Suisse
18:20 Impulsion sur la PME de production connectée
M. Raphaël Müller
Senior Consultant Industrial Solutions, Brütsch/Rüegger Outils SA
18:40 Impulsion sur les données de production sécurisées
M. René Fell et M. Frans Imbert-Vier
Président, VIGISWISS / Directeur, UBCOM SA
19:00 Table ronde et débat avec les intervenants
19:45 Apéritif dînatoire et réseautage

Modération par M. Gaetan Vannay, COO Securaxis, Conférencier.

 
La connectivité des objets et des machines est devenu, au cours de ces dernières années, un phénomène croissant dans le monde de l’industrie. Les chaînes de production et de valeur se connectent, les entreprises toutes entières traitent des milliers de données. L’industrie 4.0 plonge les entrepreneurs dans des questionnements liés aux opportunités que cela représente, au gain de temps et d’efficacité que cela permet, au retour sur investissement mais également à un risque en terme de sécurité des données. Le secteur des PME de production dans les domaines de la microtechnique, de la machines-outils et les sous-traitants sont concernés par ces questions, tout autant que les PME des autres domaines d’activités. Les intervenants nous apporteront une vision concrète et pratique sur ces sujets et les préoccupations qui y sont liées.
 
L’inscription est gratuite mais obligatoire jusqu’au 05 mars 2018. Les places sont attribuées selon leur ordre d’arrivée.

 

event Life Sciences

Life Sciences workshops - Valuation from a start-up perspective

Date: 07.02.2019

Place: Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area AG, Gewerbestrasse 24, 4123 Allschwil

event Life Sciences

Life Sciences workshops - Negotiation

Date: 31.01.2019

Place: Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area AG, Room Vision, Gewerbestrasse 24, 4123 Allschwil

Innovation Report

report Life Sciences

“Our business is the most beautiful business in the world”

04.09.2018

Giacomo di Nepi has a successful history: A high level executive in big corporations, he transitioned towards biotech, currently as CEO of Polyphor, which, in May 2018, he led to the IPO. We spoke to Giacomo about serving patients, the timing for an IPO and the people needed in a biotech.

BaselArea.swiss: What do you check first these days – your emails or the stock market?

Giacomo di Nepi: Emails and meetings are still more important on a daily basis. Of course I check the stock market but the volatility is such that I stopped to try to interpret the market in the short term. But of course I look at it in its development and my commitment is clear to have the stock appreciating and increasing the value delivered to the shareholders who put their trust and investment in our ideas, technology and team.

You served in big corporations such as McKinsey and Novartis. What made you join a startup like Polyphor?

Sure, I come from multinationals, but I worked elsewhere, too. My last job was with InterMune, a Californian biotech. I started the operations in Europe from zero, from my home. If the weather was nice, we moved our meetings from the dining room into the garden. This grew into an operation of 200 people, bringing the drug to the patients affected by idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. With a startup, you have the possibility of looking at all the dimensions of a company from a much broader perspective. Therefore, Polyphor was attractive for me, but there were other reasons, too.

Such as…?

… the dramatically fantastic science which certainly is one of the fundamentals. Polyphor is a company that has discovered the first new class of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in the last 50 years. This is radical innovation. Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a huge problem. You have patients that get an infection, then are treated with 20 different drugs and they die nevertheless. This is unacceptable. Pneumonia from Pseudomonas aeruginosa today has a mortality rate of 30 to 40 percent. Also, when a woman has metastatic breast cancer and is in her third line of chemotherapy,  she has very few therapeutic options and her prognosis is devastating. We want to save lives and give more time to patients. This is what for me makes our business the most beautiful business in the world. It is heartbreaking to see these patients.

So you meet with patients?

Sure. Lately, I brought a patient to Polyphor: A fantastic woman with colonization of Pseudomonas took part in the earlier trials. She has great courage and a willingness to fight for life that is really moving and inspiring for all of us. She talked about her experience because I believe that everybody should have a touch of feeling of what we are trying to achieve, such as people not directly involved in development, for example working in units such as in accounting who normally only see the invoices for the trial.

Polyphor underwent a transformation from research to R&D focused biopharma company in the last couple of years. How did the organization digest the change?

When you move from one stage to the next stage, you raise the bar because in development, projects are multi-year, complex projects with big expenditure. It really changes the mindset. Personally, I like change. I am not interested in doing administration. And this particular change was necessary. This being said, we still have a big research operation focused on antibiotics and immuno-oncology, that we want to keep to find and build excellent compounds.

Basel seems to have become a hotspot for antibiotics recently.

Antibiotics have been disregarded by many large companies. But it is like in the Pascal law: if there is an empty space, something will fill it. Smaller, entrepreneurial companies are now taking the lead worldwide – and Basel is one of the key spots. Clearly, we have a very strong science base in Basel. If you want to do R&D, Basel is the best place to do it, in my opinion. And, I would not be surprised if large companies will be back….

Polyphor listed on SIX Swiss Exchange in May 2018 and raised 165 million Swiss francs. Why was an IPO the right option for Polyphor?

If you are lucky, you find a biotech with one product that is one step away from the market. We have two products that are one step away from the market: Our antibiotic Murepavadin has entered phase III while we negotiated a program with the FDA to bring our immune-oncology drug Balixafortide to the market with only one pivotal study. That puts us in a unique position. However, these studies required a lof of capital. Thanks to going public, we have the resources to develop our products and, when successful, bring them to the patients who need them. The IPO was a necessary tool given the stage of the company.

Which conditions had to be met for the IPO?

An IPO is an interesting exercise. It’s a bit like undergoing a complete physical examination. The investors don’t know the company, yet we want them to support our ideas, our vision and our team. That means they need to trust us. To gain that trust you have to be completely transparent and explain in every detail what the company is about, what the opportunities and risks are. In the end, the results were fantastic because we’ve been the largest biotech IPO in Switzerland within the last ten years. And, we’ve been one of the top 3 in Europe in the last three years.

How influential was the timing?

Timing is important, but it is not determining. The first quarter of 2018 was very good for IPOs but the second quarter was not stellar. A dozen IPOs were pulled during that period. It may happen that you have a valid IPO but don’t do it because the timing is wrong. However, you never have a non-valid IPO that you do because the timing is right.

Which reactions did you get towards Polyphor’s IPO?

Internally, we are super happy that we can work towards bringing our drugs to the patients. At the same time, we are very conscious of the responsibility and very committed. Externally, our IPO is a demonstration of the capability Switzerland and particularly the Basel area have in pharmaceuticals. The IPO was a moment of visibility, of public recognition. In a way, an IPO shows how investment-intensive this business is. I hope it’s a good sign for the whole industry that we are capable of starting new companies, making them flourish and bringing new therapies to the patients.

Why did you choose the Swiss Exchange?

We already had quite a large shareholder base in Switzerland, so it was natural to go to the Swiss stock market. We were a known entity. Switzerland is a fantastic market, I am happy with the choice. In fact, I wonder why it is not chosen more often. There are available funds, there are investors that are familiar with pharmaceuticals and that are willing to take the risk.

What are the plans for Polyphor for the next couple of years?

Our vision is clear: We want to become a leader in antibiotics and help fighting and reducing the threat that comes from multi drug resistant pathogens. At the same time we want to advance a new class of immune oncology drugs. We are developing third line therapies for metastatic breast cancer. The women affected by this have very few therapeutic options. However, we believe that the potential of the drug can go beyond this patient population, for example in earlier lines of breast cancer and to other combinations and indications. This would bring us to a much more competitive field.

How do you get there?

We have to make sure that we have the organization and the culture that allow us to perform our studies effectively. We want to make sure that the pieces of the organizational machinery are in the right order and that we have all the competences that we need.

What do you do to achieve this?

I recognize talent as one – if not the – key component of success for a company. Consequently, I dedicate a lot of effort and a lot of commitment to do this task. I interview candidates two or three times, I don’t mind. I also have them interviewed by their future colleagues. When I was at Novartis, I had fantastic experiences with the young high potential. Why? Because they have the brains and the capability. It doesn’t matter if they have little experience because the rest of the organization is stuffed with it. It is different in biotech where you absolutely depend on hiring people with relevant experience since no one else has it in the company.

And how about the cultural changes when transitioning from big pharma into a biotech?

Experience, however, is only part of the story. I met a lot of people who have experience – but are not able of making a photocopy and need three people reporting to them in order to be able to achieve anything. They are not good either. That is why I look for a sort of “schizophrenic profile”: In biotech you need people who have experience, capability and vision while at the same time they need to roll up their sleeves, be practical about their choices and do things on their own.

Interview: Annett Altvater and Stephan Emmerth

report Invest in Basel region

BaselArea.swiss welcomes BeiGene to Basel

20.09.2018

report BaselArea.swiss

Den Digitaltag in der Region Basel erleben

19.09.2018

report Invest in Basel region

Basel pharma companies invest most in R&D

15.07.2018

The 24 Interpharma companies spent a total of 96 billion Swiss francs on research and development worldwide in 2017. Of this, 7 billion francs were invested in Switzerland. When compared with the sales they generated in Switzerland, the companies’ Swiss research investment was more than twice as high. According to the association, this is a testament to the great significance of Switzerland as a research location and the innovation taking place at these companies.

Investment in research and development has been especially high among companies that have their headquarters in Switzerland, such as Roche and Novartis.

Interpharma highlights the key role the pharma industry in the Swiss export sector plays. The association also notes that more than 86 patents were registered per million employees in pharmaceutical research in Switzerland between 2012 and 2016. This is more than double the number of Denmark and five times as many as in Germany.

Among the Interpharma members are companies such as Novartis, Roche, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca, Sanofi, Lilly, Johnson & Johnson, Bayer or GlaxoSmithKline.

Investments in the future

How committed the life science companies are to Basel is also reflected with regard to their planned investments which is as high as 6 billion Swiss francs. Roche, for instance, is in the process of renewing its Basel and Kaiseraugst sites. By 2023, the company with the long heritage in Basel will have invested 3 billion Swiss francs into their infrastructure. Some buildings are being modernized, while others are rebuilt completely. Bau 1, with 178 meters the tallest building in Switzerland, was opened in 2015 and cost 550 million Swiss Francs.

The remarkable tower that was designed by world-class architects Herzog & de Meuron from Basel provides workspace for approximately 2000 employees. Meanwhile, the big brother is under construction: Bau 2 will be 205 meters high and provide space for approximately 1700 employees. At the Kaiseraugst site, the group constructs an IT hub to gather all IT functions under one roof whilst taking the strategic role of technology and the growing numbers of IT employees into account. Roche will invest more than half a billion Swiss francs in Kaiseraugst.

More investments are under way in Basel:

The Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute invests 90 millions Swiss francs in their new building in Allschwil, providing 900 workspaces. The new building is due in late 2020.

The Biozentrum of the University of Basel constructs a site for students and researchers, spending 328 million Swiss francs. Further, the University builds a Life Sciences Campus, concentrating different disciplines in one location to foster collaboration. The Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering of the ETH is also part of the project.
The University Hospital of Basel will realize a new building by 2032, costing approximately 1,2 billion Swiss francs. In 2017, the hospital opened new state-of-the-art surgery facilities.

report Innovation

University of Basel and ETH Zurich co-found the Botnar Research Centre in Basel

19.09.2018

report

BaseLaunch’s second round – 10 projects enter Phase I

18.09.2018

report Invest in Basel region

Basel has the biggest economic potential

13.07.2018

Basel has the biggest economic potential in Europe, according to a new study from BAK Economics. The city on the bend of the Rhine ranked particularly well for competitiveness, while Geneva and Zurich also came in the top five.

BAK Economics has published a study on the economic potential of the 65 most important cities and 181 regions in Europe. Its findings revealed that Switzerland’s cities and regions are among the best in the Economic Potential Index.

Basel scooped 116 points to take the top spot. A key factor in its success was its pole position for competitiveness with 124 points. For attractiveness, the city on the bend of the Rhine took third place with 109 points, and for economic performance it ranked equally high with 114 points.

Geneva followed in second place with 115 points among the cities with the highest economic potential. London took third with 113 points and Zurich fourth with 112 points. The city on the Limmat was also named the most attractive of all 65 cities studied.  

On a regional level, Basel was considered part of north-west Switzerland, which ranked fourth with 111 points. For competitiveness, it came second with 117 points, behind the Stockholm capital region with 122 points.

For best regions overall, Zurich was named third with 112 points behind London in second and Stockholm in first place. However, the Swiss regions have the greatest overall economic potential in Europe: the Lake Geneva region ranked sixth, Central Switzerland seventh, and Ticino eighth, with the Swiss regions occupying half of the top ten places.  

report Life Sciences

Clariant calls for higher-value specialty chemicals

18.09.2018

report Invest in Basel region

At a glance: The Life Sciences Cluster Basel Region

17.09.2018

report Life Sciences

"Processes Kill Innovation"

03.07.2018

The serial entrepreneur Neil Goldsmith is drawn to new ventures. We spoke to him about discovering talent suitable for start-ups and about his current involvement with BaseLaunch.

You have founded and led a number of companies over the last 30 years. How did you know that entrepreneurship was for you?

It was a complete coincidence. I was aiming for a PhD but an unexpected policy issue disrupted my plans and I wondered what I should do next. My first company worked in the area of applying game theory to the advertising business, but I soon realised that this did not entirely correspond to my interests. It was at this point that I came across a job offer in the Sunday Times: a consulting company was looking for someone to launch and advise new life sciences companies. One of these companies was located in Sweden, and they hired me later as a troubleshooter for business development. Afterwards, I was offered the role of CEO in a Danish diagnostics company which was soon sold to Roche – by which time I was 31. The investors in that company proceeded to ask me if I could become the CEO of two more of their portfolio ventures, and so it went from there, with my gradually becoming increasingly proactive in the actual creation of new ventures. You could say that I took the initiative, but it was actually my career which sort of found me.

You often participated in small companies that grew big. How did this transition influence the possibility to innovate?

In my understanding, innovation means that you see something others have not seen yet. This is far more likely in small companies. Big companies have to develop processes sooner or later – and processes kill innovation. You can always find exceptions, and there are possibilities to delay the effect of processes. Google, for example, pushed a lot of decision-making out to the guys at the front line to ensure innovation. But my belief is that the processes will always get you in the end.

What is the biggest difference between managing a private and a public company and where are you more at ease?

Switching from a private to a public company means your investors and your board change. In private companies, investors and board tend to mingle; the people on your board have a lot of skin in the game themselves. Once you are public, these roles usually split, and board members become more like “guardians”. While they can be very good people, they will, for example, inevitably be more risk-averse – which might be completely right for a bank, but I am not sure if it is good for technology ventures. Being public also changes the communication style of a company. In a private company, discussions can be more open. So, as you might guess, a private company is more my thing.

What do you find crucial for starting an innovative company?

Finding the right people is the single biggest challenge. It is not so much the specific skills that are difficult to find; it is the ability to function in a very fluid and ambiguous environment. You will not have all the resources or information you need, but you still need to be able to make smart decisions. Especially for senior staff from big corporations it can be challenging to adapt to a start-up. Everybody has an early learning curve, but if you see people who joined a few months ago wanting more structure and regarding their fluid working conditions as chaotic, then they will probably not adapt – though of course there are roles where you must have structure. I would say it works out half the time.

You decided to relocate the last company you headed, Evolva, to Switzerland. You left Evolva last year, but you are still in Switzerland…

Evolva’s origins were Danish, but we faced the problem of a limited pool in terms of money and people for what we wanted to do at the time. We discussed the UK, the United States and Switzerland as possible locations, and finally we chose Switzerland. As a life sciences hub, Basel was the obvious location. At first, we could not find labs, but the predecessor organisation of BaselArea.swiss in collaboration with BLKB helped us buy and convert an old warehouse into labs. It was a good decision to settle here, and I still enjoy living in Delémont.

You are not known for idleness. What are you currently working on?

I am working on building a new set of life science ventures, both in the classic healthcare spaces and the whole consumer/industrial which I think has tremendous potential but needs different business models. And I have joined the board of an industrial biotech called Unibio that has managed to bring to commercial scale a fermentation process that converts methane gas into protein. Further, I am supporting startups through non-profit organizations such as BaselArea.swiss and its healthcare accelerator BaseLaunch.

Where do you see the potential for the start-up scene in Basel – and how will you contribute to shaping it with BaseLaunch?

Due to its scientific talent and the unrivalled management expertise spread by the large corporates, Basel ought to have a really vibrant start-up scene. It is also fortunate that Switzerland is not short of money. I think it could be more vibrant. Traditionally, the best talent has been siphoned off into the large companies, and the money and ideas have not connected as well as they might. BaseLaunch has started addressing some of these disconnects during the last two years by leveraging the knowledge of large pharma to assist the formation of very early ventures. We hope to go further with this approach in the future.

Where do you find suitable projects that are worth pursuing?

As companies grow, they inevitably narrow their focus – I do not think I have ever seen it go the other way. This results in a lot of interesting stuff getting deprioritised. I try to filter what companies do not want anymore, with the benefit that I can start with an asset that has been at least somewhat worked up and is commercially grounded. Innovation does not only come from Universities, and sometimes I think the public sector misses this point when it designs support schemes.

What objectives and values do your ventures have in common? Is there a common thread?

I like to create products that are meaningful and make a real difference to at least a part of the world – that are not “me too”. For example with Personal Chemistry, a company I co-founded in 1996, we pioneered the application of microwaves to organic chemistry synthesis, and nowadays almost every chemistry discovery lab has one or more of these instruments, and people are using them daily. It really gives me a good feeling when I see one of those instruments, even if they come from one of our competitors.

How easy is it for you to find funding for your ventures?

It is never easy, and one of the issues is that investors like to hunt in packs, which tends to make them avoid ideas that are too different – even if they like it, they know others will need to be convinced as well. Europe is too conservative regarding the funding of ideas. It is frustrating because I think that unconventional ideas can be businesses, too – as the Americans have shown time and time again.

When do you know the time has come to leave a company?

I find that when it comes to optimisation, it is time for me to move on. It is a normal process most companies go through: once a company has found its sweet spot, it increasingly becomes about optimising what it has, but it’s not for me. I like to create things. And I certainly never take the same path twice.

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