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Innovation Events

event Innovation

Innovation Lounge «Le Tout Connecté»

Date: 06.03.2018

Place: Cinémont, Rue Emile-Boéchat 85, 2800 Delémont

BaselArea.swiss, Creapole SA et Raiffeisen Suisse ont le plaisir de vous inviter à l’événement « Innovation Lounge » qui aura lieu le 6 mars 2018 à Delémont.
 
Cette manifestation vous amènera, grâce à des impulsions visionnaires, à découvrir de nouvelles voies dans l’innovation et plus particulièrement dans la PME de production connectée et les données de production sécurisées. Cette rencontre s’adresse aux entrepreneurs, patrons de PME et décideurs qui sont intéressés par l’innovation et la thématique « Le Tout Connecté ».
 
Venez nombreux chercher et échanger de nouvelles idées lors de cette
deuxième édition.

 
Programme

17:30  Accueil des invités
18:00 Ouverture par
M. Domenico Scala
Président, BaselArea.swiss
18:10 Introduction par
M. Patrik Gisel
Président de la Direction, Raiffeisen Suisse
18:20 Impulsion sur la PME de production connectée
M. Raphaël Müller
Senior Consultant Industrial Solutions, Brütsch/Rüegger Outils SA
18:40 Impulsion sur les données de production sécurisées
M. René Fell et M. Frans Imbert-Vier
Président, VIGISWISS / Directeur, UBCOM SA
19:00 Table ronde et débat avec les intervenants
19:45 Apéritif dînatoire et réseautage

Modération par M. Gaetan Vannay, COO Securaxis, Conférencier.

 
La connectivité des objets et des machines est devenu, au cours de ces dernières années, un phénomène croissant dans le monde de l’industrie. Les chaînes de production et de valeur se connectent, les entreprises toutes entières traitent des milliers de données. L’industrie 4.0 plonge les entrepreneurs dans des questionnements liés aux opportunités que cela représente, au gain de temps et d’efficacité que cela permet, au retour sur investissement mais également à un risque en terme de sécurité des données. Le secteur des PME de production dans les domaines de la microtechnique, de la machines-outils et les sous-traitants sont concernés par ces questions, tout autant que les PME des autres domaines d’activités. Les intervenants nous apporteront une vision concrète et pratique sur ces sujets et les préoccupations qui y sont liées.
 
L’inscription est gratuite mais obligatoire jusqu’au 05 mars 2018. Les places sont attribuées selon leur ordre d’arrivée.

 

event Supporting Entrepreneurs

Seminar "How to start a company in Switzerland"

Date: 29.11.2018

Place: Amtshausgasse 7, 4410 Liestal

event Innovation

2nd Swiss Industrial Chemistry Symposium 2018

Date: 19.10.2018

Place: University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, St. Johanns-Ring 19, 4056 Basel

Innovation Report

report Invest in Basel region

Basel has the biggest economic potential

13.07.2018

Basel has the biggest economic potential in Europe, according to a new study from BAK Economics. The city on the bend of the Rhine ranked particularly well for competitiveness, while Geneva and Zurich also came in the top five.

BAK Economics has published a study on the economic potential of the 65 most important cities and 181 regions in Europe. Its findings revealed that Switzerland’s cities and regions are among the best in the Economic Potential Index.

Basel scooped 116 points to take the top spot. A key factor in its success was its pole position for competitiveness with 124 points. For attractiveness, the city on the bend of the Rhine took third place with 109 points, and for economic performance it ranked equally high with 114 points.

Geneva followed in second place with 115 points among the cities with the highest economic potential. London took third with 113 points and Zurich fourth with 112 points. The city on the Limmat was also named the most attractive of all 65 cities studied.  

On a regional level, Basel was considered part of north-west Switzerland, which ranked fourth with 111 points. For competitiveness, it came second with 117 points, behind the Stockholm capital region with 122 points.

For best regions overall, Zurich was named third with 112 points behind London in second and Stockholm in first place. However, the Swiss regions have the greatest overall economic potential in Europe: the Lake Geneva region ranked sixth, Central Switzerland seventh, and Ticino eighth, with the Swiss regions occupying half of the top ten places.  

report Invest in Basel region

Life sciences boost Basel tourism

20.07.2018

report Production Technologies

L’impression 3D, des technologies en plein développement dans les sciences de la vie

18.07.2018

report BaselArea.swiss

"Processes Kill Innovation"

03.07.2018

The serial entrepreneur Neil Goldsmith is drawn to new ventures. We spoke to him about discovering talent suitable for start-ups and about his current involvement with BaseLaunch.

You have founded and led a number of companies over the last 30 years. How did you know that entrepreneurship was for you?

It was a complete coincidence. I was aiming for a PhD but an unexpected policy issue disrupted my plans and I wondered what I should do next. My first company worked in the area of applying game theory to the advertising business, but I soon realised that this did not entirely correspond to my interests. It was at this point that I came across a job offer in the Sunday Times: a consulting company was looking for someone to launch and advise new life sciences companies. One of these companies was located in Sweden, and they hired me later as a troubleshooter for business development. Afterwards, I was offered the role of CEO in a Danish diagnostics company which was soon sold to Roche – by which time I was 31. The investors in that company proceeded to ask me if I could become the CEO of two more of their portfolio ventures, and so it went from there, with my gradually becoming increasingly proactive in the actual creation of new ventures. You could say that I took the initiative, but it was actually my career which sort of found me.

You often participated in small companies that grew big. How did this transition influence the possibility to innovate?

In my understanding, innovation means that you see something others have not seen yet. This is far more likely in small companies. Big companies have to develop processes sooner or later – and processes kill innovation. You can always find exceptions, and there are possibilities to delay the effect of processes. Google, for example, pushed a lot of decision-making out to the guys at the front line to ensure innovation. But my belief is that the processes will always get you in the end.

What is the biggest difference between managing a private and a public company and where are you more at ease?

Switching from a private to a public company means your investors and your board change. In private companies, investors and board tend to mingle; the people on your board have a lot of skin in the game themselves. Once you are public, these roles usually split, and board members become more like “guardians”. While they can be very good people, they will, for example, inevitably be more risk-averse – which might be completely right for a bank, but I am not sure if it is good for technology ventures. Being public also changes the communication style of a company. In a private company, discussions can be more open. So, as you might guess, a private company is more my thing.

What do you find crucial for starting an innovative company?

Finding the right people is the single biggest challenge. It is not so much the specific skills that are difficult to find; it is the ability to function in a very fluid and ambiguous environment. You will not have all the resources or information you need, but you still need to be able to make smart decisions. Especially for senior staff from big corporations it can be challenging to adapt to a start-up. Everybody has an early learning curve, but if you see people who joined a few months ago wanting more structure and regarding their fluid working conditions as chaotic, then they will probably not adapt – though of course there are roles where you must have structure. I would say it works out half the time.

You decided to relocate the last company you headed, Evolva, to Switzerland. You left Evolva last year, but you are still in Switzerland…

Evolva’s origins were Danish, but we faced the problem of a limited pool in terms of money and people for what we wanted to do at the time. We discussed the UK, the United States and Switzerland as possible locations, and finally we chose Switzerland. As a life sciences hub, Basel was the obvious location. At first, we could not find labs, but the predecessor organisation of BaselArea.swiss in collaboration with BLKB helped us buy and convert an old warehouse into labs. It was a good decision to settle here, and I still enjoy living in Delémont.

You are not known for idleness. What are you currently working on?

I am working on building a new set of life science ventures, both in the classic healthcare spaces and the whole consumer/industrial which I think has tremendous potential but needs different business models. And I have joined the board of an industrial biotech called Unibio that has managed to bring to commercial scale a fermentation process that converts methane gas into protein. Further, I am supporting startups through non-profit organizations such as BaselArea.swiss and its healthcare accelerator BaseLaunch.

Where do you see the potential for the start-up scene in Basel – and how will you contribute to shaping it with BaseLaunch?

Due to its scientific talent and the unrivalled management expertise spread by the large corporates, Basel ought to have a really vibrant start-up scene. It is also fortunate that Switzerland is not short of money. I think it could be more vibrant. Traditionally, the best talent has been siphoned off into the large companies, and the money and ideas have not connected as well as they might. BaseLaunch has started addressing some of these disconnects during the last two years by leveraging the knowledge of large pharma to assist the formation of very early ventures. We hope to go further with this approach in the future.

Where do you find suitable projects that are worth pursuing?

As companies grow, they inevitably narrow their focus – I do not think I have ever seen it go the other way. This results in a lot of interesting stuff getting deprioritised. I try to filter what companies do not want anymore, with the benefit that I can start with an asset that has been at least somewhat worked up and is commercially grounded. Innovation does not only come from Universities, and sometimes I think the public sector misses this point when it designs support schemes.

What objectives and values do your ventures have in common? Is there a common thread?

I like to create products that are meaningful and make a real difference to at least a part of the world – that are not “me too”. For example with Personal Chemistry, a company I co-founded in 1996, we pioneered the application of microwaves to organic chemistry synthesis, and nowadays almost every chemistry discovery lab has one or more of these instruments, and people are using them daily. It really gives me a good feeling when I see one of those instruments, even if they come from one of our competitors.

How easy is it for you to find funding for your ventures?

It is never easy, and one of the issues is that investors like to hunt in packs, which tends to make them avoid ideas that are too different – even if they like it, they know others will need to be convinced as well. Europe is too conservative regarding the funding of ideas. It is frustrating because I think that unconventional ideas can be businesses, too – as the Americans have shown time and time again.

When do you know the time has come to leave a company?

I find that when it comes to optimisation, it is time for me to move on. It is a normal process most companies go through: once a company has found its sweet spot, it increasingly becomes about optimising what it has, but it’s not for me. I like to create things. And I certainly never take the same path twice.

report Production Technologies

So bringt uns die Technologie 4.0 weiter

17.07.2018

report ICT

Allthings raises capital for PropTech platform

16.07.2018

report Life Sciences

“Basel has all the ingredients required to host a successful company”

11.06.2018

The physician and pharmacologist Nicole Onetto is a member of the Board of Directors at the Basilea Pharmaceutica AG. In the Interview that was featured in Basilea’s annual report she talks about current challenges in oncology.

Great strides are being made in the long-term treatment of oncology patients. As an oncology expert, what do you find to be the most important advancements in the industry?

Nicole Onetto: We see spectacular results in terms of long-term survival in quite a few diseases where, less than ten years ago, there were no new treatments available. And for many forms of cancer, where previously we had only access to traditional therapies such as surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, we have been able to take advantage of the new molecular understanding of cancer to personalize the treatment for each patient. This has facilitated the development and the utilization of targeted therapies associated with superior efficacy and reduced toxicity compared to traditional treatments. Finally, in the last few years, we have been able to harness the potential of the immune system to develop new therapeutic approaches which stimulate our own immune defenses to control cancer growth.

What do you see as the next major treatment improvements that may be achieved in the short and mid-term?

Definitely the further development of immune therapies for cancer patients seems more and more important. These new modalities will need to find the right place in the management of patients and will have to be used in combination with more traditional therapies. The cost-effectiveness of these innovative technologies will also need to be evaluated. Another very important topic will be minimizing toxicity of treatments and avoiding over-treatment.

How can companies succeed in clinical development?

With a more personalized approach to cancer treatment, new opportunities do exist to develop drugs associated with high efficacy in well-defined patient populations. However, drug development will always require patience, perseverance and scientific rigor. Many challenges still remain in treating cancer patients, despite the important progress that has been made. Among others issues, drug resistance is a significant hurdle and continues to be in the focus of Basilea. For patients with resistant diseases, not so long ago, the only possible approach was to change to a new drug, often a new chemotherapy. Now we have gained more insight into the mechanisms of resistance. In addition, many researchers all over the world are investigating the best ways to circumvent treatment resistance. Other important factors are collaborations between academia and the private sector such as companies like Basilea, to develop new innovative drugs to benefit patients.

How can this be supported?

The use of biomarkers to help choose the most appropriate treatment regimen and to select the patients with the highest probability of response to treatment has and will continue to have a major impact on the development of new cancer agents. Biomarker data are key to the design of development plans of new drugs and to go/no go decisions. These data are now often incorporated in the approval process and subsequent commercialization of new drugs. This approach, based on scientific evidence to select new drugs, is one of the major advances that are currently transforming the research and development process as well as clinical study methodology.

Do you see advantages for Basilea being located in Basel?

Basel has all the ingredients required to host a successful company: a vibrant research community, an international reputation of excellence in the pharma industry, a pool of talented people and a strong and stable economy. Basel is a leading life-science hub with the presence of an excellent university, the headquarters of established large pharmaceutical companies and many start-ups and innovative ventures. There are many similarities between Basel and the few well established biotechnology hubs in Europe and North America. This favorable environment has already helped Basilea build a very strong company and should continue to support its further success. So I am delighted to have been elected by Basilea’s shareholders as a member of the board and look forward to playing an active role in the Basel biotech community.

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